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Playing my Conn NWll alto with this set up,an old white tip Brilhart Ebolin (think it's a #5) mouthpiece I bought about a year ago using a red Vandoren Java reed. I flipped a Rovner dark lig over so the screws sit on the reed and found a better sound,
if that's possible. Is this something that is common? Wondering why I didn't think of it earlier.
 

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The pamphlet that comes with Rovner ligatures gives instructions for 'inverted' use.
A couple players that I know prefer the bars on the reed over strap on the reed.
 

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Flipping ligs goes back about 100 years. Having the screws on top was considered radical. The Brilhart Level Air may have been the first mouthpiece to come that way. Like said above, Rovner recommends trying the 'pins' on the reed if you don't like it 'inverted'. More importantly, and this is the most overlooked thing in sax playing, Rovner recommends lubricating the screw and pin moving parts for best results, and that translates to any ligature with a screw clamp. I fully expect a thread to develop with arguing about the best ligature lubricant.
 

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I use figizzle
 

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I did this the other day on my Phil-tone tribute, after noticing my dad had flipped it. It actually sounds better imho. It would seem to me it's less surface area against the reed allowing for more vibration (esp. in the center of the reed). Though that may not be what everyone is going for.

As far as screw lubricant goes, WD-40 has a fairly dry tone.
 

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Flipping ligs goes back about 100 years. Having the screws on top was considered radical. The Brilhart Level Air may have been the first mouthpiece to come that way. Like said above, Rovner recommends trying the 'pins' on the reed if you don't like it 'inverted'. More importantly, and this is the most overlooked thing in sax playing, Rovner recommends lubricating the screw and pin moving parts for best results, and that translates to any ligature with a screw clamp. I fully expect a thread to develop with arguing about the best ligature lubricant.
... isn't playing saxophone by itself radical enough? ;)
 

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Bottom line with ligatures, if it fits properly, holds the reed on firmly, and isn't too 'fiddly' to use, you're all set. If it meets those parameters, right side up, upside down, or sideways, you're good to go. At that point forget it and concentrate on playing the music.
 

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As far as screw lubricant goes, WD-40 has a fairly dry tone.
WD-40 isn't really a lubricant IMO. They may market it as an allpurpose thing that includes lubrication but I think its real function is moisture displacement and freeing up corroded things etc.

Not ideal on a ligature apart from to free up the screw if it is seized. After that use normal oil. Engine oil or sewing machine oil, 3 in 1 or something.

It will only affect the sound in that it will get your ligature working properly. As opposed to one that isn't working and hence people talk about "the sound of the ligature" Huh!
 

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WD40 works great for cleaning a motorcycle chain, but lithium grease has a much more pleasing timbre.
 

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WD40 works great for cleaning a motorcycle chain, but lithium grease has a much more pleasing timbre.
........especially lithium grease with a 5 digit serial number............
 

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WD-40 isn't really a lubricant IMO. They may market it as an allpurpose thing that includes lubrication but I think its real function is moisture displacement and freeing up corroded things etc.
Yep and it doesn’t last very long.
WD-40 stands for Water Displacement perfected on the 40th try.
https://www.wd40.com/cool-stuff/history
 

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Bottom line with ligatures, if it fits properly, holds the reed on firmly, and isn't too 'fiddly' to use, you're all set. If it meets those parameters, right side up, upside down, or sideways, you're good to go. At that point forget it and concentrate on playing the music.

Amen.
 

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Rotating it 360 has twice the effect.
I heard a guy on the radio say that the sports program had been in the dumps for years, but turned around 360 degrees since he got there.

I had to pull my car over to the side of the road.
 

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A rhetorical question, perhaps but it’s really cool that Rovner states it clearly as one of 2 options. I currently have the pins on reed setup of a Rovner extra slim soprano ligature with a Couf/Runyon 5* slim soprano piece. It sounds great and it’s easier to use this way. Just have to be careful-putting the cap on away from the reed before it settles around the pins.

Who reads the instructions first?
 
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