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Discussion Starter #1
Under additional options there's:

Roo Pads - $170

Whats the difference? Kangaroo skin or something? :bluewink:
 

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Eggzackly! Skippy skin. It makes nice leather that can be split down really thin and has other qualities that are particularly suited to pads.

We've gotte do something with all the road kill.
 

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Eggzackly! Skippy skin. It makes nice leather that can be split down really thin and has other qualities that are particularly suited to pads.

We've gotte do something with all the road kill.
Yup, Roo skin is good stuff!

Don't you eat your road kill down there? Lots of 'Hillbillys' around here do.... ;) :)
 

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Yup, Roo skin is good stuff!

Don't you eat your road kill down there? Lots of 'Hillbillys' around here do.... ;) :)
I've eaten a bit of roo myself - it's good lean stuff. But not road kill. In our climate the flies and maggots get into it pretty quickly.
 

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Now I'm not a pro tech, but I do occasional maintainance on my horn, and tried a few roo pads once. The difficulty I ran into was that they seemed to shrink a bit more than traditional pads when they were heated. I'm sure it probably requires working regularly with them to get things just right. It would probably have been best to have a qualified tech do the work. Anyway, I yanked them and went back to the traditional Selmer pads.

Randy
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Discussion Starter #7
Now I'm not a pro tech, but I do occasional maintainance on my horn, and tried a few roo pads once. The difficulty I ran into was that they seemed to shrink a bit more than traditional pads when they were heated. I'm sure it probably requires working regularly with them to get things just right. It would probably have been best to have a qualified tech do the work. Anyway, I yanked them and went back to the traditional Selmer pads.
So I just heard: 170 bucks extra for nothin any good.
That right?
 

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I'm not saying that...I'm just saying I'm not a pro tech, so I'm not qualified to install them. I've heard very good reviews about the roo pads.

Randy
www.randyhunterjazz.com
Online Jazz Lessons and Books
Lesson Series:
Making Sense of Jazz Improvisation
Introduction to the Blues
The Arpeggio Circle
Through the Keys
and more...
Lessons page: www.beginningsax.com/Jazz Improv Lessons.htm
Rhythm Changes Demo: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SrT0Xw_y9d0
Rhythm Changes Lesson:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tMOW7QAfpwo
YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/saxtrax
 

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I was once "introduced" to Roo pads, they lasted less than a week, I went back to Pisoni.

JR

(when I say "lasted" I mean I couldn't stand them)
 

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Many say that Roo pads will stick less and offer better sealing. They have a small but really dedicated following. I can't figure out why there is dedicated following at all. I have two saxophones with Roo pads because they came that way and as far as sticking less or sealing better, I have not noticed any difference whatsoever between them and my horns with Pisoni pads. You can get them in black or white and that may be a reason to want to spend the your extra money but I would not recommend them as a technical improvement.
 

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While I've personally perceived them as less subject to sticking that's a judgment based upon my personal user/ playing profile- not yours- and a judgment which has no objective data analysis to back it up.

I do a lot of rolled tone holes and Martin's and they appear- again nothing but "feel"- to work very well for me.

I can state categorically that they are far far more resistant to tearing. This has some real benefits for enthusiastic pad pricking/ adjusting/ refloating over the years and perhaps for use on not-properly-smoothed tonehole edges and the palm keys.

I like 'em and use 'em on all but Bueschers where I usually stick with resopads ( DID use- with excellent results- a set on a 400 TH&C tenor), but largely "just because" as a personal preference rather than based upon any hard data.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I'm not saying that...I'm just saying I'm not a pro tech, so I'm not qualified to install them. I've heard very good reviews about the roo pads.
Gotcha.

Thanks all, I think thats all the info I need.

Happy feasting!
Cheers
 

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Roo pads are very good but a 170$ price difference in the buying price (which is a lot more if you consider the fact that most, if not all, Taiwanese saxophones, of which Barone is one, normally come with excellent pads made by Pisoni ) is very steep . Especially if these are Roo pads made in Taiwan ( Mr. Tom Kuo has a factory in Taiwan which produces Roo pads) .
 

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They have a small but really dedicated following. I can't figure out why there is dedicated following at all.
It started in the (Ra/Bue)scher community and spread, very slowly, from there. Way back in the 30s, Rascher had pads made from roo while touring Australia. I think it was another 60 years before it caught on.
 

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I'd be interested to know what pads repair techs stock and use normally (if working with someone that does not have a preference) and if it's a profit margin decision or what.
I'd imagine that most would (in the states at least) would stock Prestini/Valentino or some generic pad like the lower lines that Pisoni makes (Mypads, Evatex, PRO, STAR LP, Gold Sound, Red Sound, Blue Sound, Not the Lucien Deluxe or Premium Deluxe) or from M.Chanu (the pad most Taiwanese/Chinese horn makers use).
 

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over here most technicians use Pisoni a few use Rigotti and Prestini and of course one shop uses Toptone!
 

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I played a horn in a store one time that had been re-padded with roo pads and I personally really liked the feel. It had a very crisp, solid feel as you pressed a key down. This may perhaps have had more to do with the felt used as the pad backing than the roo leather. A $170 add seems a bit high.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Roo pads are very good but a 170$ price difference in the buying price (which is a lot more if you consider the fact that most, if not all, Taiwanese saxophones, of which Barone is one, normally come with excellent pads made by Pisoni ) is very steep . Especially if these are Roo pads made in Taiwan ( Mr. Tom Kuo has a factory in Taiwan which produces Roo pads) .
Would your opinion change if they were made elsewhere?
 

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no, 170 $ more for a set of Roo pads is still a lot of money for a set (remember that a normally fitted sax has already very good pads so this is on top of the price of good pads)
 
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