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I have also put this here as I wasn't sure where it would come under - please move if necessary

I've seen on here that some saxes ave rolled holes.

How do you know if a sax has rolled holes, and what other types are there, and how do you identify them?

Do you find all the differnt kinds of holes on all types of saxes, and which are the best types of holes to have?
 

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Most common type is drawn where the hole is part of the body and pulled up like a sleeve and then filed smooth.
Next would be drawn and rolled where the edge of the hole is rolled down like when you roll up your sleeves. It will have an edge that looks like a ring attached.
Some older saxes have soldered tone holes that look like drawn only with a line of solder where the hole is attached to the body.
Martin and a few others had Soldered and beveled holes. These were thick metal that had the edges beveled to give a wide seat for the pad.
My opinion is that the Martin type is best followed by the drawn and rolled.
Keep in mind that the Selmer Mark VI has only drawn holes.
 

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Keilwerth is another brand that still manufactures saxes with rolled tone holes. Models like their SX-90R (the R stands for Rolled) have them. I had RTH on my Bundy "Special" tenor, which is an old Keilwerth stencil. I really like them - they help the low end of the horn respond very well.
 

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There are actually two ways to make a rolled tone hole, as Bruce decribed and also by soldering a ring on top of the drawn tone hole. I believe that is how Keilwerth does it.

RTHs tend more toward sticking pads if all else is equal due to the larger surface area that contacts the pad. The only real benefit that I can tell is they tend to make a good quality pad last nearly forever. I have a 30's Couesnon that is still playing well with all but a couple of the original pads.

Here is what a rolled tone hole looks like:

 

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I think P. Mauriat also sells saxophones with rolled tone holes - don't they? As I recall, the model designator has an "R" in the model number to designate the rolled tone holes.

As far as what rolled tone holes contribute to the horn's playability, I agree with the others. I owned a Conn Chu alto once that had rolled tone holes. No big deal as far as I could tell. DAVE
 

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yes, Dave, you're totally eight about the mauriats.
i found the same, i don't really see much difference,
but from a technical point of view, they are harder to distort, but when hey are distorted, much harder to level.
 
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