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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2013
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Andy Farber just pointed out that Ted Nash the fabulous alto player on many of those Henry Mancini albums of the sixties passed away on May 12th. His namesake and nephew, tenorman Ted Nash is still alive and playing.

RIP uncle Ted.
 

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Ted (the nephew) had old Ted on skype on his laptop the day before he passed. This was during a rehearsal of the Jazz @ Lincoln Center Orchestra. The band played the old Les Brown tune "Leap Frog" over Skype to old Ted back in LA. Apparently it was a beautiful moment. That was on the 11th and Ted passed away on May 12.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Bass Sax Boss
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I never met Ted Nash but he was a pen pal of mine. I always thought his solos with Mancini and Paul Weston were absolute perfection. I wrote to him a few times to ask about some of his recordings and he never failed to answer me with polite, intelligent answers. I still have his letters, and I still think he was the perfect studio soloist.
 

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Ted Nash the elder was the saxophonist selected by composer Franz Waxman to perform the alto solos on his score for A Place In The Sun. The story has it Waxman auditioned many until he found the one he thought right for the job.

Richard (Dick) Nash is a trombonist on Hollywood films scores, haven't checked but presume he's related.
 

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Richard (Dick) Nash is a trombonist on Hollywood films scores, haven't checked but presume he's related.
Dick Nash is Ted's brother and the father of Ted Nash who plays alto with the Jazz @ Lincoln Center Orchestra.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Columnist and Saxophonistic Art
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I never met Ted Nash but he was a pen pal of mine. I always thought his solos with Mancini and Paul Weston were absolute perfection. I wrote to him a few times to ask about some of his recordings and he never failed to answer me with polite, intelligent answers. I still have his letters, and I still think he was the perfect studio soloist.
Ted was together in places that were inspiring and...he was very very creative within everything he did. I sure loved his book- and what he did.
 
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