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Discussion Starter #1
hi,
my right thumb rest fell off (from a curved soprano). the sax is several years old, well looked after. i was playing and the right thumb rest just fell off.
so far, all i have done is slightly brush off what appeared to be cement glue from the metal bit that is attached to the saxophone before the right thumb rest.

could anyone tell me what i can, rather, should use, to reattach the right thumb rest?
can i use glue, does it require something more advanced such as soldering?

PS: i have considered going to the tech from the get go, but if the solution is rather simple, given it will not really change anything about the horn itself, i figure it would be worth a shot for me to try it.
 

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hi,
my right thumb rest fell off (from a curved soprano). the sax is several years old, well looked after. i was playing and the right thumb rest just fell off.
so far, all i have done is slightly brush off what appeared to be cement glue from the metal bit that is attached to the saxophone before the right thumb rest.

could anyone tell me what i can, rather, should use, to reattach the right thumb rest?
can i use glue, does it require something more advanced such as soldering?

PS: i have considered going to the tech from the get go, but if the solution is rather simple, given it will not really change anything about the horn itself, i figure it would be worth a shot for me to try it.
1) Do you have a modern two piece thumb hook where there's a part soldered to the sax and the hook is attached to that with a screw?

2) If so, is it the case that the base has fallen off the sax (not just that the hook has come loose from the base)?

3) Your description sounds kind of like someone knocked it off before and instead of repairing it properly by soldering it back to the body of the sax, they just glued it back on and now it's fallen off.

If #3 is accurate, the correct repair method is to solder it back on. The two surfaces will need to be cleaned thoroughly and all glue residues removed. There may be some minor damage to the finish in the immediate area. A repairer can do a job like this in under a half hour (unless there's an unexpected problem in cleaning the surfaces).
 

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Discussion Starter #3
1) Do you have a modern two piece thumb hook where there's a part soldered to the sax and the hook is attached to that with a screw?

2) If so, is it the case that the base has fallen off the sax (not just that the hook has come loose from the base)?

3) Your description sounds kind of like someone knocked it off before and instead of repairing it properly by soldering it back to the body of the sax, they just glued it back on and now it's fallen off.

If #3 is accurate, the correct repair method is to solder it back on. The two surfaces will need to be cleaned thoroughly and all glue residues removed. There may be some minor damage to the finish in the immediate area. A repairer can do a job like this in under a half hour (unless there's an unexpected problem in cleaning the surfaces).
1+2 - correct, the base has fallen off the sax - not simply the hook.
3 - sounds like I will then have to take it back to the tech since soldering is needed. I was hoping I could put it back together myself with the correct material, but I am in no way able to solder it back in place with confidence.

any idea about the costs for such a job?? ps: i am in Berlin (hence I will pay in euros)


As to the life of the horn and whether someone knocked it off or not, I am just not sure. It is a Yani 992 curved soprano, that passed on from a few serious musicians to me. I have had it for over 5 years and it has been great - last year I took it to my most trusted tech so far and got also a throrough cleaning done as springs had began to rust. it has always played great (as far as I can hear it and compared to other sopranos).

thanks a lot for the help!
I can only bring it to the tech next monday - if someone else can chip in with an alternative, let me know - otherwise, i will update when the job is done
 

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Whew, thank goodness !

I was afraid this was posted by one of my customers ! :whistle:

(....rimshot)

You can use some hardware-store variety things, but honestly...as Turf suggested...just get it done right so you never have to worry about it. It is maybe a 10-minute repair, so here in the US it would cost between $25-50. You may lose some lacquer in the area due to the necessity to clean the body tube to bare brass there.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Whew, thank goodness !

I was afraid this was posted by one of my customers ! :whistle:

(....rimshot)

You can use some hardware-store variety things, but honestly...as Turf suggested...just get it done right so you never have to worry about it. It is maybe a 10-minute repair, so here in the US it would cost between $25-50. You may lose some lacquer in the area due to the necessity to clean the body tube to bare brass there.
great. thank you. as you guys have experience repairing, i will seek a tech here to get it done.
unfortunately, the tech i know here is good but last time he fixed a small dent on the bell rim of another sax he scratched the rim just a bit - i suppose it could not be helped, but i fear for the finish around the thumb rest base...

hopefully by next week I will have it fixed and then say how it was done. thanks again for the advice!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
here are the results - check photos. i luckily got out earlier today and got the tech near me to fix the problem.

so, in your professional opinions, do you think the job was well done? everytime i get something done on my saxophone is like my heart is a bit in my mouth - from the way sometime i see people handling them to repair, it seems i am a bit too over zealus.

so far it is holding. i think this job is pretty permanent. there is some lacquer scratches, which the tech warned me before hand could happen. i still think there could be none, but he has his style...

i saw the job being done with soldering. looked difficult enough with a torch, etc for me to have tried alone.

cost: 25Euro. time for the job, about 15min.
 

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Looks good from a location and structural standpoint. Is there still some residual solder along the seam ? Looks like there is from the last photo. That could be cleaned up a bit so the seam looks nice and neat.

But other than that, the plate is back on and secure with solder so it shouldn't cause future issues.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the feedback. Yes, there is some solder left. on the side. The aesthetics seem more important to me than to this tech I go to.
I realise a few hours in that the actual screw hole is used up and not holding properly.

Unfortunately, this means i might need to go back, and replace the whole base for a new one. Oh man:(:cry:.

First searches online shows me no hits for original yanagisawa right thum bases. I sort of am so bummed - thought i fixed a problem and then found something else that rendered the solution a mute point. plus the cost of doing it again.

any advice on right thumb rest bases for a curved yanagisawa 992 - as in where to buy one?
 

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I had a guitar playing friend of mine come over with some flux and some solder and he put my thumb rest back on when it fell off. The amount of solder on there before looked almost like a joke. I was not surprised it came off.

He bought a little torch lighter from the hardware store and put it back on. There's enough solder in there now that I imagine it will be 1,000 years before it comes off again.
 

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From your photos it looks as if the thumb hook tightening screw was screwed in too far and pushed in the body underneath the base. It is my guess that this contributed to the base coming unsoldered and is why the threads on the base for the tightening screw are messed up. There are some tricks to keeping the thumb hook from moving back and forth without tightening the screw to China. Sorry this happened.

I just checked Conn-Selmer since they are the source for Yanagisawa parts and the few parts for sopranos they list are not in stock. Your best bet will be to have the base unsoldered, have the hole tapped to take a slightly larger screw, have the tech find or make a brass screw that will work, and then solder the base back onto the sax. Not good news at all, but I'm afraid this is the best you can expect, unless someone else has a better idea.
 

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From your photos it looks as if the thumb hook tightening screw was screwed in too far and pushed in the body underneath the base. It is my guess that this contributed to the base coming unsoldered and is why the threads on the base for the tightening screw are messed up. There are some tricks to keeping the thumb hook from moving back and forth without tightening the screw to China. Sorry this happened.

I just checked Conn-Selmer since they are the source for Yanagisawa parts and the few parts for sopranos they list are not in stock. Your best bet will be to have the base unsoldered, have the hole tapped to take a slightly larger screw, have the tech find or make a brass screw that will work, and then solder the base back onto the sax. Not good news at all, but I'm afraid this is the best you can expect, unless someone else has a better idea.
Why not just file the end of the screw so when fully tightened it doesn't contact the tube?
 

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Why not just file the end of the screw so when fully tightened it doesn't contact the tube?
The OP indicated that the original "screw hole" (threads) are not holding properly. Otherwise that would be a good solution.
 

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Die Schraube ist zu lang und es die Talsohle in das Loch, die Platte aus dem Körper zu zwingen. Die Schraube ist zu lang, dass es auch den falsche Thread haben kann. Finden Sie die richtige Schraube!
The screw is too long and it bottomed out in the hole forcing plate off the body. Being the screw is too long it may also have the incorrect thread. Find correct screw !
 

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Discussion Starter #16
From your photos it looks as if the thumb hook tightening screw was screwed in too far and pushed in the body underneath the base. It is my guess that this contributed to the base coming unsoldered and is why the threads on the base for the tightening screw are messed up. There are some tricks to keeping the thumb hook from moving back and forth without tightening the screw to China. Sorry this happened.

I just checked Conn-Selmer since they are the source for Yanagisawa parts and the few parts for sopranos they list are not in stock. Your best bet will be to have the base unsoldered, have the hole tapped to take a slightly larger screw, have the tech find or make a brass screw that will work, and then solder the base back onto the sax. Not good news at all, but I'm afraid this is the best you can expect, unless someone else has a better idea.
Thank you. And yes, you are correct. The tech noticed this and got the dent back in place pretty good. I realise now that the reason that happened in the first place is also related to the hole not holding the screw well enough and being driven further. I had a system with corks underneath the thumb rest to raise it and had to use longer screws, which I thought measured correctly. I think the hole kept being wasted and the screw tightened further, pushing down cork and hence making a dent.
The dent was repaired, which is good...but all else needs solving
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Höchstwahrscheinlich ist die Schraube metrisch. Stellen Sie sicher, dass es der richtige Metrik standard ist.
Most likely the screw is metric. Make sure it is of the correct metric standard.

https://www.wuerth-industrie.com/we...neniso_unterschiede/unterscheidung_diniso.php
Thank you. I will look into this and maybe pay a trip to Bauhaus here in Berlin to see what I can find regarding the screws. I would love for it to be a simple matter of a slightly bigger screw working!
PS: I still have the original screw with thumb hook and the screw is not holding at all. this points also to the fact that whatever screw i used after (when i raised the height of the hook - so my right thumb would not hurt so much) messed up the original hole there...
 

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Sehr gut. €25 war ehrlich mit delle entfernen. Diese Verbindung hat auch Deutsch auf Symbolleiste. Viel Glück! Lassen Sie uns wissen Sie, Ergebnis.

Very good. $30.94 was honest with dent removal. Link has German format on tool bar. Good luck!
 

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Forum members. The screwed story.
My background includes experience on machines from 1900’s to current. Europe, Asia,UK,USA. When you put a 1950’s German origin 6mm 1.25 screw into a 2005 Japanese machine and it snaps off. You learn about standards....they were same thread count different pitch! A $.40 screw killed a $3.2 million machine for half a day. Screwing a sax is no different 🐷
 

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I wonder if the original screw was lost at one time and a too-long, incorrect-thread screw was substituted.
That would account for everything.

On my Yanagisawa (probably older than yours, and straight, but likely to be the same mounting) the screw is only 3.6mm long.
It is a 4mm diameter thread (i.e. the diameter of the screw measures slightly under that.)
Standard pitch for 4mm diameter is 0.7mm, but this seems to be 0.75, which is not uncommon. (Hard to tell for such a short screw.)
 
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