Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So, this is my first post here on this forum. So from research of the internet i have learned about how to tell good reeds from bad. I have been on one box for approx. 5-6 months and i still have 6 left, out of those i realized two things. Most of my reeds which i had used were a slight yellow color. Now, i noticed two, one which is almost white ( like really) and another which is dark(er) then the others with brown streaks. I am guessing the darkest one with streaks is the worst because 'one of the rules is discoloration'(right? i don't always believe the net). but the brighter one looks really odd two so I am really not sure. Would pics help?

thx in advance,
pce,
Nash
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,831 Posts
i think its not easy looking at a reed, and thinking? does that one play well",rico royals are good reeds as a rule!..i use them a lot most in the box" play straight away some need to be persuaded!!..to play after a while, but they usually come through, if one is a little stuffy"..i play for a while put it away then try again in a day or so!..after a few days they are usually very good!.
The older rico royals were very good consistent!,and play easily.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
14,303 Posts
Nash: More controversy, I'm sure. I've never been able to identify a good reed by looking at it (with the obvious exception of chipped or split tips). I've read and heard all the stuff about the consistency of the grain while looking at the tip in front of strong light, or the dark grain on the butt-end, but it all came down to proper preparation and adjusting - actually playing the thing. I've picked what i thought would be a playable reed by those standards, then been disappointed when I played it.

Cane reeds, being natural products are inconsistent, even among the same brand, strength, and cut. If I didn't prep and adjust my reeds, probably only two out of ten would be decent players. But by taking some time with them, I usually find the whole box will play. Another assumption is that the player has played enough of a variety to know with which brand and strength to start.

I realize that others may have a different perspective and they find every reed playable. But for the life of me, I don't know what to look for to determine if a reed will play before I play it. DAVE
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
thx for you input guys, so what exactly should i look for wrong when i play them? i just soak them in water for 2 minutes timed, play them for 4 min timed again, let them dry on a clean surface then put them in the (containers? what exactly is that word...).

thx again
Nash
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,799 Posts
Nash: More controversy, I'm sure. I've never been able to identify a good reed by looking at it (with the obvious exception of chipped or split tips).

Cane reeds, being natural products are inconsistent, even among the same brand, strength, and cut.

But for the life of me, I don't know what to look for to determine if a reed will play before I play it. DAVE
+1!!!!!!
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
14,303 Posts
Nash: Weird way to word a question . . . what to look for WRONG? Well, when you find a good playing reed, you'll know it - the tone will be pure, the response easy and strong, etc. Lot's written about reed prep and adjustments. I too soak mine when they are new (and when they've dried out and need to be played again).

There are many approaches to reed-prep. Basically, wet them, play them for maybe 10 minutes, press dry them on a paper towel, rub the vamps several times with your thumb over the towel, place them in a reed guard to keep them as flat as possible, re-visit in a day or two. To adjust, I keep mine right on the mouthpiece, then use a sharp knife to scrape some bark of the heart of the vamps (be careful of the edges and the tip), rinse, play, and re-do that until the reed starts to come into better playing shape. DAVE
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,369 Posts
What I like doing is break them over a week. I select X number of reeds, soak them for 5 minutes, play them softly the first 3 days for 5 - 10 min, gradually increasing how hard I blow. After that, I rotate them throughout my practice session. One important thing is I buy reeds which are slightly too hard for my piece, as a consequence, after the 1 week break in period, the stuffy reeds I opened at the beginning of the week play perfect.

I keep an "emergency" reed box in my case and they're a 1/2 strength lower than those reeds I break in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
606 Posts
I play Rico Royals, and really like them, although I don't notice that much of a difference among brands I've tried. When I play, I soak my reed for 5-10 minutes and then put it on the mouthpiece and go. The new reeds start to sound better on about the third play. When I'm done, I rinse the reed with tap water, wipe it with a paper towel, put it in a reed guard, and drop it in my sax case. Some reeds don't respond as well as others, but I have found very, very few which were significantly not working. The whole "zen" of reed prep and doctoring must be over my head.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top