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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There are a few options for openings. I play a 1958 Martin Indiana tenor, and a Cannonball Big Bell Stone Tenor. Which tip opening would be best for me? I like vandoren Java reeds (2.5 in regular, and 3 in Red file cut).
 

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Really the tip size is more about fitting you. It's not really about fitting the sax.

What mouthpiece are you using now? Where are you in your playing development (school student, college, later starter, professional, years playing, etc.)? What type of music do you play? And what exactly are you going for with this mouthpiece as far as tone and style go?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I play jazz, and big band style music, and have been playing about 7 or 8 years now. On my cannonball I still use the stock mpc, and I have an old conn precision on the Martin indiana. I'm going for a good "warm" tone.
 

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Haha, slow down tiger; I can't fathom a metalite giving a 'warm' tone. Colorful and extremely brilliant? Yes. Sticking out as lead player in a big band? Yes. A screamer in 'modern' jazz? Yes. A love maker for a soft soothing ballad commonly played in the bedroom before evoking certain emotions of sensuality, relaxation, and/or suspended mental bliss? I don't think so.

Metalite's are known for being very loud[?], bright, edgy mouthpieces. Personally for a "warm" tone, I would suggest something along the lines of a HR Link, a vandoren V5 or V16, or many other non-rock/funk/rnb orientated mouthpieces.
 

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I can get a warm tone out of my Metalite MTM7. It actually subtones quite nicely. It's not only bright & edgy. There's more complexity to it than that.

I must admit that I was surprised by these findings.
 

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I use a Metalite M5 (.095") on my three Martin tenors. I have been playing tenor for 49 years, used Links, Selmers, Brilharts and the M5 is a fantastic mouthpiece for the $$$. The M7 may be too much to start with and the M3 too closed. I also keep a Rico Graftonite A5 and B5.
 

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I can get a warm tone out of my Metalite MTM7. It actually subtones quite nicely. It's not only bright & edgy. There's more complexity to it than that.
I can only second that! It can do everything. That's the beauty of this piece. Very cheap to acquire and it does everything you want it to do. M7 for me!
I was also very pleasantly surprised...
 

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A subtone can get a lot of a "bright" mouthpiece. The Metalites are definitely one dimensional though. You'd be more versatile on the new "Vintage" slant by otto link, though it is like 15 times the price.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So M5 or M7 ???
 

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I prefer the M5. If you are going from a stock mouthpiece, the M7 May be way too much. The stock CB or the Conn are both probably about a .075" max. The M5 is about .095" and the M7 is .105" I think.
 

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If you're playing on relatively closed mouthpieces like the ones you mentioned, try the 5 first. It won't cost you that much, and it's the safest bet. Then come back here and tell us how you like it.
 

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As far as altissimo, wouldnt an M7 be better than a 5?
 

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You can play jazz as smooth and warm as you would like on a Metalite as long if you are not pushing it too hard.
It all depends on your embouchure and your air control and aiming for the sound you got in your head. Or simply put: hold your horses.
I would recommend the M9. But if that is a too big leap a M7 tip.
I think it is actually great fun to play a mouthpiece like this for jazz knowing it has got a lot more power under the hood.
But beware it can be loud!
It would probably be not be the best choice for ensemble work unless the other saxes play metalites too.
 

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A Metalite is $20, buy the M5 and M7. Better yet, pick up the M5 and Rico H lig&cap from Kesslers for $35 and add the M7 to your order for $20. You've only spent $55 for the whole shot - a lot cheaper than all the alternatives.
 

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I use a Metalite on alto because my Buescher 140 has a sweet smallish tone and the Metalite allows me to open up the horn.
The top isn't thin or too bright.
I haven't tried one on tenor.
The Graftonite didn't do it for me on tenor.
 

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The Graftonites are no good. The Metalites rock.
 

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I'm currently using a Meyer 6M on my tenor. I bought it a couple of years ago and it was my only mouthpiece. Then i started reading threads here about getting that 'big sound' and got some, I'll admit, big ideas. So I shelved the Meyer and bought a Guardala MBII at WWBW last year. I was using 2.5 Vandoren Green Box Javas with the MBII. I could blow it but it took a lot of work. I finally admitted to myself that I was in over my head. I've been playing a couple of years but still consider myself a beginner. Jazz standards are my area of interest and I can play Summertime, Sunny Side of the Street, All of Me and a few more in this genre. Right now I'm starting on Georgia on my Mind.

A couple of months ago, I bought a Vandoren Java (not a Jumbo Java) T75 tenor mouthpiece in new condition from a seller here. I put away the MBII and started using the HR Java T75 with 2.5 Green Box Javas. While I found it easier to blow than the MBII, it didn't come easily or naturally.

So I went back to the Meyer 6M using 3 Green Box Java reeds. I've tried the ZZs, the Red Box, and the V16s and find the Green Box Javas to be the easiest to play with and I like the sound I'm getting. Now that I've come back to the Meyer, I've gained a new appreciation for it. I find I can control it and bend notes with it and my facial/jaw muscles don't get tired using it. The only drawback is that I have to be careful not to overflow it.

Sorry for the preamble beginning to sound more like rambling but here's a question for you more experienced players out there: the Rico Metallites are cheap and I'm going to buy one. I'd like to go a step up from my Meyer 6M with regard to getting a little bigger sound but I don't want to get in over my head again. Can you suggest a Metallite (M7, for example) which might take me up a step? Thanks.
Jim
 

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I too play Metalites, & they are anything but "one dimensional".
With practice they can do pretty well everything....Warm, subtone, whisper, scream....it's the player not the mouthpiece.
They do tend to become warmer as the tip size increases....be aware of that.
 
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