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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After two years of use I can write here a small review with positive and negative points of my Yanagisawa AWO10.

Negative points:
1-The lacquering is very fragile and already shows signs of wear (see photos 1 and 2 )
2-The Middle D and E middle are sharp. And they are not so easily manageable.
3-The factory configuration did not come as expected and it was necessary to take the sax to a luthier. Every six months small adjustments were necessary.

Positive points:
1-The sax is beautiful(see photo 3) ,very comfortable to play. Ergonomics is perfect for me.
2-The C # / medium high Db are in tune. This is excellent, especially on the alto sax. The octave notes are also in tune, the exception of medium D/E.
3-Sax is very versatile, excellent for classical music, jazz and smooth jazz.
4-The sax sound is "hot", "fat", "big", lots of harmonics and very easy to blow.

Conclusion:

When I bought the Yanagisawa AWO10 I tried the YAS 62IV, YAS82Z, SUPER ACTION SERIE 2 AND 3. In my humble opinion, Yanagisawa proved to be the best among these saxes.
 

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ewertongoncalves said:
1-The lacquering is very fragile and already shows signs of wear (see photos 1 and 2 )
With regard to lacquer wear, I agree that Yanagisawa should probably look into why their lacquer seems to be so sensitive to certain body chemistries. I'm always looking at Yany pictures and I see this sort of lacquer wear on many bare brass touches. However, I personally don't seem to have the same problem. I owned my previous Yany alto (an A991) for over 5 years and never had much lacquer wear on the touches. I don't do anything special either. I very rarely wipe down my horns, but I conclude that my perspiration must be relatively mild. On my current, two year old AWO10 I currently have zero lacquer wear and could resell it for mint condition if I desired. I also see a lot of nasty corrosion particularly in horns coming from Japan. I always wondered if perhaps living close to the ocean could result in more extensive corrosion.

ewertongoncalves said:
2-The Middle D and E middle are sharp. And they are not so easily manageable.
I don't have much problems with middle D or E. D is only slightly sharp for me and opening my throat to bring it back in tunes make the note sound really nice. However, I find that middle and upper C are flat and I have to firm up my embouchure to bring them back in tune. At present this affects the tone in a slightly negative way, but one I can deal with.

ewertongoncalves said:
3-The factory configuration did not come as expected and it was necessary to take the sax to a luthier. Every six months small adjustments were necessary.
All regularly played instruments will need periodic adjustments by a technician. I tend to wait about a year between adjustments, but every 6 months doesn't sound out of the ordinary. Of course if that means you have to travel a long distance I can see how that would be annoying. I've been meaning to learn how to make minor adjustments myself to save myself the hassle and money for only minor issues.

ewertongoncalves said:
Positive points:
1-The sax is beautiful(see photo 3) ,very comfortable to play. Ergonomics is perfect for me.
2-The C # / medium high Db are in tune. This is excellent, especially on the alto sax. The octave notes are also in tune, the exception of medium D/E.
3-Sax is very versatile, excellent for classical music, jazz and smooth jazz.
4-The sax sound is "hot", "fat", "big", lots of harmonics and very easy to blow.
AGREED! I believe the WO series really improved over the 9XX series in terms of tone. Of course that's from my perspective. I love the tone I get from a lot of the 8XX horns I've blown too, but for some reason the 9XX horns seem to have a less centered tone. The only nitpick I have is that when playing classical repertoire I can never quite get that French classical sound. I like the WO tone better but for classical saxophone the standard seems to lean toward the French tone concept.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
With regard to lacquer wear, I agree that Yanagisawa should probably look into why their lacquer seems to be so sensitive to certain body chemistries. I'm always looking at Yany pictures and I see this sort of lacquer wear on many bare brass touches. However, I personally don't seem to have the same problem. I owned my previous Yany alto (an A991) for over 5 years and never had much lacquer wear on the touches. I don't do anything special either. I very rarely wipe down my horns, but I conclude that my perspiration must be relatively mild. On my current, two year old AWO10 I currently have zero lacquer wear and could resell it for mint condition if I desired. I also see a lot of nasty corrosion particularly in horns coming from Japan. I always wondered if perhaps living close to the ocean could result in more extensive corrosion.


I don't have much problems with middle D or E. D is only slightly sharp for me and opening my throat to bring it back in tunes make the note sound really nice. However, I find that middle and upper C are flat and I have to firm up my embouchure to bring them back in tune. At present this affects the tone in a slightly negative way, but one I can deal with.


All regularly played instruments will need periodic adjustments by a technician. I tend to wait about a year between adjustments, but every 6 months doesn't sound out of the ordinary. Of course if that means you have to travel a long distance I can see how that would be annoying. I've been meaning to learn how to make minor adjustments myself to save myself the hassle and money for only minor issues.


AGREED! I believe the WO series really improved over the 9XX series in terms of tone. Of course that's from my perspective. I love the tone I get from a lot of the 8XX horns I've blown too, but for some reason the 9XX horns seem to have a less centered tone. The only nitpick I have is that when playing classical repertoire I can never quite get that French classical sound. I like the WO tone better but for classical saxophone the standard seems to lean toward the French tone concept.
Thanks for the answer
 

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I've owned several Yanagisawa saxophones over the years. I've had mixed experiences with their lacquer. None of the altos have shown any wear. However, every soprano, save for a '70's era Dorado 600 stencil (like the S-6), has shown lacquer wear on various parts of the horns. Totally cosmetic, though. DAVE
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Dave i also have a SCWO10 and also have the same problem with the lacquering.I think the problem with the fragile lacquering of my saxophones is because I live near the beach and also because of the increased chemical composition of salts in my skin.But the most important thing is the sound on the sax. And that the yanagisawa does excellently.
 

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Interesting. I have a 1983 A880 and the lacquer is near 100%. I’m the second owner, and though the first owner took meticulous care of it I know he played it quite a bit. The only obvious wear on the lacquer is on the octave thumb key. I also have an S992 from around 2000 (and am the 2nd owner also), and it has zero lacquer wear, anywhere. The first owner definitely played it reasonably often as well. Don’t know what to make of all this—location, personal body chemistry, the production run the sax came from, and usage patterns all have to factor in. Intonation is really good on both of them; the 880 plays sharp on middle D but it’s easily brought in tune with voicing (my BA alto, on the other hand, not so easy…). I’m disappointed to hear that the WO lacquer may not be as solid as that on the previous generations, but curious to hear if this is ubiquitous or just the case on the few examples noted here. I really enjoy playing these instruments, especially the A880.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
bmisf as for medium D/E sharps i have dropped the low B and has resolved in part,although it is difficult to execute fast sentences.
 

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Speaking generally across brands and different players i believe excessive lacquer wear can be due to the acidity of the player's perspiration. Across different brands including a Yani. T500 many years ago ive not had this problem.
I am curious to play one as you think its better than a SA80 Serie 11 that takes some doing for all round qualities .
 

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I noticed on the new tenors that the G# cluster was smaller than the 991. Is that the case on the Alto?
 

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I noticed on the new tenors that the G# cluster was smaller than the 991. Is that the case on the Alto?
I’ve owned a A991, A992 and an AWO10 and I don’t believe there is any difference in size.
 

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I’ve owned a A991, A992 and an AWO10 and I don’t believe there is any difference in size.
Which, of course, leads to the age old question of whether size matters . ..:rolleyes:
 
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I have T-WO 2 sax, which has shed the lacquer on the thumb button and hook very quickly. I complained to Yanagisawa and I was told that I was rubbing the sax too hard. Not true. The lacquer everywhere else on the sax is fine.

I have also A-WO 1, which has been rubbed much longer, and the lacquer on both places holds just fine.

My theory is that they have had some manufacturing error caused by some employee who did not prepare the surface of these parts before lacquering (degreasing etc.) well enough.

One still needs to keep in mind that these are manual workers not very different (and better paid) than similar manual workers from other parts of the world. There are normal simple manual workers working in the Yanagisawa company. Mistakes simply happen.

Yanagisawa blames their mistakes on the user. Luckily these mistakes are of the cosmetic nature and do not affect functionality of the instrument. Unfortunatelly I do not like the metalic smell on my fingers much...

BTW the tenor has also a soldering acid leak on the bow and had two keywork rods loosening...

Alto had no problems at all. EDIT: now I remember it had, it had one mother of pearl button move in the key.
 

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