Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 20 of 38 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
629 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm trying to get the right amount of reverb when recording; any useful tips would be appreciated.

Overall I'd think "as little as possible" is right, vs over-saturated karaoke sounding gimmicky washy sound.

Most pros I listen to, you can't tell it's there, when done right. Just under where its noticeable.

Any general guidlines? I'm testing it because it adds depth, like layering... thx!
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2009-
Joined
·
2,761 Posts
I really prefer sub-threshold delay to reverb; seems to provide a more "realistic" presence, especially if playing outdoors.
 

·
Moderator
Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
Joined
·
29,610 Posts
For me the trick is to use two reverbs. One a short room or ambience up to about one second, then a longer reverb, e.g. Hall or plate. The room helps with binding in with other instruments and also means you can use less of the reverb so you can still get lushness and depth of sound without the amateurish overdoing of it.

i sometimes compress the reverb

I will adjust predelay depending on context
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
8,336 Posts
Big subject . I don't use digital reverb on my own music although on the commercial stuff I'm engaged in we do. I bought a Vermona Retroverb unit a while ago. Its an analogue spring reverb...beautiful big warm sound that I adjust to whatever I'm doing. I've had a lot of complements from very critical producers and engineers I know so I think I'm on the right track. I used it on acapella vocals which I think are hard to get right and the results after a few experiments are good. Spring reverb doesn't work on drums too well though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
629 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thanks; great tips.. I'm also getting an Art tube preamp to warm up the sound; the necessary hassle will be doing test recordings to vary it to see what sounds best. great tips Pete; hadn't thought of that re 2 reverbs; makes sense for spatial layered sound; thx; using my zoom h4n I can get 2 separate inputs on different mics

I've got a boss ve-20; will get the art preamp next week, plus tweak software reverb/compression/delay etc in post in my sony vegas nle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,559 Posts
I had a small Art tube preamp for years that I used live with a Sennheiser 441.
It brought the signal up. I Bought a Behringer mixer so I could have a sub mix for all my stuff.
I liked the flute sound without the tube better, not so hollow sounding.
I gave it to my bass player who loves it for acoustic bass guitar and upright.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,559 Posts
I don't find that all on this unit. I use the Vermona on horns, guitars. percussion . It really is superb. I use a shorter analogue reverb on drums
Must be an outstanding unit. In the 70s I had the: Great British Spring. It was in a plastic tube with springs inside and had a special preamp. It sounded great until the pre died.
I've seen a real plate reverb that took up a whole small sound-insulated room. Amazing reverb for drums.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
629 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
here's the boss ve-20; pricey & more for vocals than instruments, but really works well (epic for karaoke pedal / looper too); I use it w/behringer mixer + sony mdr-7506 headphones:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002W0Z8DU/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eOL18Dhgvjo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DswmR_kc6AM

& the art preamp (I just ordered it so haven't tested it yet)
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0002GZZNY/

the purist in me keeps encouraging classic long tone practice & woodshedding, which I've done a lot this year; but it's amazing the impact good reverb/sound mix has on the sound quality, too
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,559 Posts
Same preamp I had. Like many tube pre/amps the second harmonic is enhanced. I think that's why it's so good on bass.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
8,336 Posts
Must be an outstanding unit. In the 70s I had the: Great British Spring. It was in a plastic tube with springs inside and had a special preamp. It sounded great until the pre died.
I've seen a real plate reverb that took up a whole small sound-insulated room. Amazing reverb for drums.
Yep it's nothing like the Great British .. we had one back in the day too... Big ugly drainpipe...
 

·
Moderator
Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
Joined
·
29,610 Posts
I will adjust predelay depending on context
Predelay can have quite an effect. This is the amount of time before the reverb actually kicks in, and you can use it to alter the positional perspective of the listener.

If you think about an actual performance by a band in a hall, then the sound of any ambience is different from the stage (or front of the hall) to what it is at the back.

If you are sitting at the back you hear the sound of the band more or less along with all the reflections (ambience/reverberation of the hall). However from the stage you tend to hear first of all the actual sound you are making, and the reflections, a lot of which come from the back of the room) get bounced back to you slightly later (as with a reverb unit pre delay)

So (very simply) if you have a significant pre delay this emulates what the band hears on stage. With o or very little pre-delray this emulates what the audience at the back hear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,529 Posts
I'm trying to get the right amount of reverb when recording.......!
If you are only talking about studio recording, you could record your tracks dry and then apply reverb in the mix. If this is what you want to do, you could look at applying reverb effects via your mixing software.
 

·
Moderator
Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
Joined
·
29,610 Posts
If you are only talking about studio recording, you could record your tracks dry and then apply reverb in the mix. If this is what you want to do, you could look at applying reverb effects via your mixing software.
I'd say this is absolutely essential. Or, put another way, it's completely pointless to record the reverb along with the signal.
 
1 - 20 of 38 Posts
Top