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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In an effort to find something to restore old oxidized hard rubber mouthpieces I came upon these products from Walker Briar Works. The thinking was that if it is ok to use on a pipe stem that you put in your mouth, it should be ok for a sax mouthpiece. Although it does not restore the mouthpiece 100% to the jet black finish, it goes a long way to restoring the color. It also removes the smell and taste associated with the oxidized sulphur of old mouthpieces. The kit is only $19 with free shipping in the U.S. and Canada.



John
 

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Cool.
Kinda like Turtle wax for your piece.
 

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Looks like a useful product. They mention that pipe stems are made of Vulcanite. Is that the same as hard rubber?

Also, it has an abrasive in the cleaner, so probably not a good idea to use inside the mouthpiece.
 

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Yes, older and higher quality pipe stems are indeed hard rubber. I work on them sometimes. Stems turn the same colors as mouthpieces and sand the same brown dust.

The abrasive would be fine inside the mouthpiece if it were mild...which it probably is for that application. Its not like your going to remove a substantial amount of material. Just stay off the table and rails.
 

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Here's another product:
http://www.pensburymanor.com/Pensbury_Garage.html
A South American technician is using it with a somewhat complicated process involving heat, to make it really durable.

Soaking in mild bleach restores most (but not all) mouthpieces to black. I don't think it removes the sulphur smell. Perhaps some sort of UV resistant sealer would do the trick.

Ozone (from the air) is a primary perisher of rubber balloons, so I guess it attacks rubber mouthpieces too.
 

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Heh, when I for the first time used an old HR-mouthpiece I thought the previous user must have been a pipe player since it tasted and smelled the same as my fathers pipes when I was a kid.

Later I realized it's the characteristic taste and smell of oxidized hard rubber, not that of pipe tobacco.

I wonder if any tobacco shops here carry that stuff? I've been thinking of finding one to get a cigar/pipe tobacco humidifier for my reeds. :D

Not many tobacco shops here nowadays though, as smoking is mostly considered rather uncivilized. Not as many pipe or cigar smokers as there used to be, mostly cigarettes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It should be remembered that all of these products create only a cosmetic change that removes a small amount of the brown outer surface or dyes the surface to restore the color. I believe that applying carnauba wax to seal and protect the finish can be an excellent preventative measure as well.

Dr. Omar Henderson of Dr's Products has a chemical process whereby the oxidized sulphur content of the hard rubber is reverted back to its original state. The process can only be done safely by a professional chemist and he charges $50 per mouthpiece for the treatment.

Another effective method to restore mouthpiece color is to buff it using Ferree's black buffing compound. Care needs to be taken to avoid removing material at the tip or the rails.

John
 

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As I mentioned on Delphi Gordon in regard to an email inquiry I sent to Pensbury 2 years ago, they do not recommend using this product on items which will be put in the mouth. They didn't say why. Maybe they were just coving their butt.

But, I've got to believe that many writers put their pen/pens of any type in their mouth occassionally. Might this scenario be different, I'm not sure. I also have never heard of a novelist dying from pen poisoning other than perhaps ink related. I won't be the crash-test dummy on this one.. I'll bet it would work quite well however.
 

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Jerry, when I first contacted Syd he tried to disuade me to use his product. After getting in touch with him, he told me pretty much that his lawyer advised him to do so, and he's covering his butt as you said. I have conducted extensive medical testing plus analysis on his product and it's really safe it you let it cure. The most potentially harmfull component in his product is ammonia, and it's not really more harmful than the sulphuric residues that we suck on when playing a good ole HR mpc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I have conducted extensive medical testing plus analysis on his product and it's really safe if you let it cure.
I'm curious as to your qualifications and standing which allow you to conduct "extensive medical testing". This is a very strong statement.

You are publicly telling others to use a dye on a mouthpiece that the vendor of that product advises against. Are you willing to face the liability should anyone have an adverse reaction to those chemicals on their mouthpiece?

John
 

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If your interested in building a humidor for reeds you can either use disks avaliable in tobacco shops that you soak or you can make your own using florist green block.

OR

Just go to a craft shop and buy a block of the type of green block used for FRESH flowers, not plastic. It absorbs like crazy. A quick and cheap container is a film canister with holes drilled in it. Just cut the stuff to thickness and use the canister like a cookie cutter, add water, put on the lid and your done for a week.

Personally, Im not into the humidity controlled reed gig but if you think it will make your reeds work better that is an easy solution.
 

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If your interested in building a humidor for reeds you can either use disks avaliable in tobacco shops that you soak or you can make your own using florist green block.

OR

Just go to a craft shop and buy a block of the type of green block used for FRESH flowers, not plastic. It absorbs like crazy. A quick and cheap container is a film canister with holes drilled in it. Just cut the stuff to thickness and use the canister like a cookie cutter, add water, put on the lid and your done for a week.

Personally, Im not into the humidity controlled reed gig but if you think it will make your reeds work better that is an easy solution.
:? What does your post have to do with restoring hard rubber mouthpieces? :?
 

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I'm curious as to your qualifications and standing which allow you to conduct "extensive medical testing". This is a very strong statement.

You are publicly telling others to use a dye on a mouthpiece that the vendor of that product advises against. Are you willing to face the liability should anyone have an adverse reaction to those chemicals on their mouthpiece?

John
yes I'm willing to face the liability. I have conducted extensive medical testing as in coming from a family of MD's, and being a dropout of the career myself, I'm quite familiar with some procedures. My father is an allergy and dermathology expert and I asked him to test the product on a sample group of his woodwind players patients (me included) Plus I also dropped out for majoring in related careers such as chemistry among others and I have analyzed the dyes components. As stated, the most harmfull component in the dye is the ammmonia and if you let it cure the recommended period of time the danger fades away. You using a hard rubber mouthpiece will pose a greater risk to your health. I didn't ask for advise on the phone or talked to an alleged expert about this, I got hands on the business myself. Many of my vintage mouthpieces are treated (I mean, the ones I actually use for playing) plus a couple of HR clarinets (granted, you don't suck on clarinets like you do on MPC's) not to mention most of my daily/weekly writers HR pens.
 

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I have conducted extensive medical testing as in coming from a family of MD's, and being a dropout of the career myself, I'm quite familiar with some procedures…, (etc)
That's good enough for me. I'm going to try this product on some vintage Berg HR pieces.
 
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