Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,943 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
How do you or what product do you use to restore the colouring of any engraved surfaces on mouthpieces? Such as white lettering or black lettering?

I want to restore the black lettering on my ivory Brilhart Personaline Tonalin. The engraving/stamping is quite deep mostly, especially on the 'personaline' and the serial number and facing size.

View attachment 27644 View attachment 27643

Sorry, these aren't great pictures but you can basically make out what I want to try and restore.

Any tips? :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,943 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Okay, I found this webpage talking about different colour filling techniques for engraved surfaces:
http://www.antaresinc.net/2004EngFactColorFill.html

I would say an enamel paint would be perfect simply wiped into the engraved section but when they talk about wiping off any excess with a cloth dampened with paint thinner I know my white plastic mpc ain't gonna like it. :(
Any thoughts on colour-filling a mpc?
 

·
Moderator
Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
Joined
·
28,944 Posts
Any thoughts on colour-filling a mpc?
I agree you may not want to use any kind of thinner on a cherished mouthpiece which you want to keep cosmetically nice, as I presume you do or you wouldn't be asking this.

If the engraving groove is still nice and deep I would try some kind of wax. You can get sticks of it for use on wood. It will cling in there and gradually harden and should wipe off the surface easily.

If the engraving grooves are worn, then you don't stand much chance either way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,943 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the suggestion Pete.
Indeed I do want it to look as nice as it can :)

I'll scout around for some dark wax product. I think it will work for all the stamping and engraving except maybe the Brilhart logo - that's pretty shallow compared to another I have with its colour filling still in it.
 

·
Moderator
Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
Joined
·
28,944 Posts
Thanks for the suggestion Pete.
Indeed I do want it to look as nice as it can :)

I'll scout around for some dark wax product. I think it will work for all the stamping and engraving except maybe the Brilhart logo - that's pretty shallow compared to another I have with its colour filling still in it.
Let us know if it works. You get that stuff at hardware stores or classy timber merchants, I'm sure you can probably get it in black.

Alternatively I was wondering if lipstick or some types of shoe polish might just work, but could take a long time before it sets to any decent level of hardness.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,979 Posts
"Color Fill" comes in a tube like tooth paste. It is like a shoe polish paste. Wipe on, let it dry a few minutes, then hand buff off the excess. It is used a lot in glass engravings.
 

·
Moderator
Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
Joined
·
28,944 Posts
"Color Fill" comes in a tube like tooth paste. It is like a shoe polish paste. Wipe on, let it dry a few minutes, then hand buff off the excess. It is use a lot in glass engravings.
Aha, that sounds like what I'm suggesting but better, and made for the purpose!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,336 Posts
"Color Fill" comes in a tube like tooth paste. It is like a shoe polish paste. Wipe on, let it dry a few minutes, then hand buff off the excess. It is used a lot in glass engravings.
Where can you buy something like this? In the repair trade we actually use gold colored crayon to restore the color to clarinet inset lettering.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,042 Posts
The "Rub n' Buff" line has assorted metallic toned waxes which lend themselves very readily to restoring the cartouche's on clarinets, the engraved markings on mouthpieces, and -for those who desire glitz- highlighting the engraving on the bell/bow/body of a sax.

The product comes in a tube. Squeeze a bit on your finger tip and smear over the area with the engraving. LET IT DRY THOUROUGHLY, and then buff it off with a rag or paper towel. The hardened product will remain in the engraving where it is quite durable. If you wipe it off before it's completely dry it'll come right out of the engraving as the wax is thicker there and dries more slowly than the thin layer on the smooth surfaces. As with most such tinkers, the key is practice and patience.

It can be removed from the engraving with WD40, a toothbrush, and liberal profanity, if you change your mind. It has no effect on the finish or the materials.

At Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...ywords=rub+buff+gold&rh=i:aps,k:rub+buff+gold
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,943 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thanks Henry this Rub'n'Buff is exactly the type of product I need for the job.
Thanks everybody for all the help and suggestions - now hopefully I can find a local supplier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,675 Posts
Okay, I found this webpage talking about different colour filling techniques for engraved surfaces:
http://www.antaresinc.net/2004EngFactColorFill.html

I would say an enamel paint would be perfect simply wiped into the engraved section but when they talk about wiping off any excess with a cloth dampened with paint thinner I know my white plastic mpc ain't gonna like it. :(
Any thoughts on colour-filling a mpc?
I've used lighter fluid(naphtha) to clean vintage plastic Brilhart mouthpieces, both black and white. I think it will remove paint.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,943 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I've used lighter fluid(naphtha) to clean vintage plastic Brilhart mouthpieces, both black and white. I think it will remove paint.
Really? I guess with the plastic being white/ivory the lustre isn't going to get cloudy.

I've got tons of suitable enamel paint in my garage it'd be nice not having to buy anything new for such a small project...
I think I'll try colour filling the engraving with that and wiping the excess down with naphtha fluid.

Thanks martinm5862 :)
 

·
Moderator
Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
Joined
·
28,944 Posts
Really? I guess with the plastic being white/ivory the lustre isn't going to get cloudy.

I've got tons of suitable enamel paint in my garage it'd be nice not having to buy anything new for such a small project...
I think I'll try colour filling the engraving with that and wiping the excess down with naphtha fluid.
First check that lighter fluid will work as a thinner for enamel paint. I think it would be fine for normal oil based gloss, but enamel paint is different I think.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,979 Posts
I have used Rub N' Buff. The only problem I have found is that the tube will dry out within a few weeks after it is opened. Even wih the cap on. Maybe some plastic wrap under the cap might help. I have used a sovent to soften it up again. A few drops of lacquer thinner I think.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
593 Posts
Id be careful of all of this. if its important to you, first make sure you dont harm it. enamels wouldnt be that easy to remove if you didnt like the result. just remember, Murphy is alive and well. be careful not to violate the rule of unintended consequences. and always have fun.

Ivory probably isnt even legal any more so be careful.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Contributor 2010
Joined
·
1,502 Posts
I agree - do NOT use any sort of solvent on a mouthpiece.

And I would use a black crayon. Easily obtainable from any neighborhood kid. Offer him a few baseball cards.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW member
Joined
·
4,673 Posts
Thread Revival !

Any ideas for white lettering?
I recently acquired a Reso Chamber alto mpc and all of the lettering is completely faded.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,494 Posts
Theres a water based acrylic paint by folk art. Its great for white lettering. It lasts a long time and all you do is rub it over the engraving and wipe off the excess with a paper towel.
Very inexpensive and it works great.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top