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So I am gathering a good techniciam doing restoration work can make a horn sound better than when it left the factory, if it already as not gone through a few cycles of restoration already as shmuelyosef puts it in a recent thread.

This got me thinking about a connumdrum I assume technicians sometimes find themselves in. Suppose you have before you a new student model saxophone that plays the low b flat adequately. Nevertheless upon disassembly you discover a good number of the tone holes are uneven.

If you file the tone holes, you should change the coresponding pads and all this work will cost the customer.

If you leave the saxophone as it is, the perfectionist in you is not happy.

In my mind this example illuminates the beauty of looking for old yamaha 23’s and the equivalent on ebay and restoring these, since presumably they will play after restoration better than a corresponding new unrestored student model.

I ask a very general question; Is there place for the competent restorer of student model saxophones?

Can such a restorer make modest claims for the superiority of restored student saxophones over the corresponding unrestored student model saxophones even if these be new?

I am gathering that apart from Yanigisawa’s most saxophones leave the factory not entirely finished.

So the restorer is as much a finisher as a restorer….
 

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Most saxes leave the factory needed some setup. Yanagisawa's are often an exception to this. Filing tone holes is a last resort. When disassembled, any good overhaul includes leveling tone holes by manipulation of the adjacent body.
 

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Yes

Yes I believe that .. factory saxes can be made better .. pro models as well as student models. I recently refinished the toneholes on a B&S. ONe of the toneholes had tool chatter marks on the surface.

Unfortunately customers rarely want to pay more.. they are satisfied with a sax that plays just well enough to not be embarrassing for their offspring. There is room for educating the consumer for a better product but you will have to do that !!

Yes working at sax overhaul is as much salesmanship as the more satisfying work of doing the work !

Sell me all your student altos $100 each -- I'm buying !

good luck
Fraser
 

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If you can afford to do $800 worth of work on a horn you can sell for $500 then go ahead. A used student horn it still a used student horn.
 

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China

Yes I send $100 Altos to China to be rebuilt and they come back as gold plated Mark VI to be sold on ebay. Where do think all those $10k MK VI come from ?? All the $$ is flowing to China ... have you seen those Mercedes auto copies? Where there is will there is a way ....

;-}
 

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Carl H. said:
If you can afford to do $800 worth of work on a horn you can sell for $500 then go ahead. A used student horn it still a used student horn.
Well said!

zigzag wrote "If you leave the saxophone as it is, the perfectionist in you is not happy."

There more you work on them, the more you know that noting is perfect on a sax. In the final analysis, to keep the weight down, a sax is very flimsy... Too flimsy really for the precision that we would like in its mechanics, especially linkages. Perfectionism must always be tempered. The mechanism on a well-designed oboe can be closer to perfection. And look what it costs!

"Can such a restorer make modest claims for the superiority of restored student saxophones over the corresponding unrestored student model saxophones even if these be new?"

Yes, but that is pretty meaningless and unbelievable to most Joe-public parents of kids learning. They are the main buyers of student instruments.
 
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