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What kind of Resonators do you have in your horn/horns....?

Plastic or Metal (or just rivets) and why your choice of either....

Domed or flat and why ??

Me ...Baritone Conn 1920- flat metal as Conn often are and to increase projection.Roo's for quieter action.

47' The Martin Tenor-Flat Metal to be original.

35-39'? La Fleur Alto Domed Metal with Rivets-my first overhaul had no idea what to use....

Thought of this poll because of a aversion to plastic resonators ,well plastic in general...and it is everywhere.
 

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Not really sure it matters all the much regarding the shape -- more about the surface area if you're looking for punch.

Likely doesn't matter at all regarding the material. For sure Buescher snaps won't get you anything domed metal doesn't answer except for a lot of work building a "Frankenhorn".

I don't blame you at all for wanting to replace the pillow pads that were probably on that thing originally. Were it me, I'd probably go for domed -- unless the flats were cheaper and easier to install. Certainly wouldn't do just rivets.
 

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I had my conn transitional tenor padded with no resonators. Sounds great. Unfortunately before it was repadded it was leaky, so I can't really offer a comparison to how it sounded with resonators.
 

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I was getting my tenor overhauled, and asked my tech. He said the material didn't really matter, that size was much more important. He recommended using plastic, as they came in more sizes, so he could more closely match the size of the resonator to the pad/hole.
 

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I own six horns and only two have plastic brown dome resos and i say they have a different color to it's tone so i guess i don't prefer one over the other.
my other four horns have metal domed resos and just sound closer to the sound i hear and want.
 

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Metal or plastic is quite a discussion. Ralph Morgan had a great interview on morgan mouthpieces blog and Ralph was the main Selmer woodwind designer, so he speaks the history of the change to plastic around 1960 or so. They tested many materials. The material was not a big factor in acoustics but the size and shape was. They also noted the metal had the rust possibility. Here’s the link:
I have OEM brown dome plastic resonators in my MK VI tenor and metal mild domed in my soprano. The tenor is a slightly darker sound, but will shift with a mouthpiece designed to be bright. The metal on the soprano seem to be a little more versatile on a soft mellow VS rowdy blues sound. The other interesting fact is the plastic is lighter and allows slightly quicker key action. The springs are designed to lift the lighter plastic. Both are hard surfaces that the sound wave bounces off while traveling through the body of the horn. The higher dome will cause a slightly more forward focused sound. Also with larger diameter resonators, less pad is exposed and there’s less absorption of the sound wave. If you have no resonators, the sound is soft and mild since it’s absorbed.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2017
Picked up a sax in 2002 and here I am.
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Metal or plastic is quite a discussion. Ralph Morgan had a great interview on morgan mouthpieces blog and Ralph was the main Selmer woodwind designer, so he speaks the history of the change to plastic around 1960 or so. They tested many materials. The material was not a big factor in acoustics but the size and shape was. They also noted the metal had the rust possibility. Here’s the link:
I have OEM brown dome plastic resonators in my MK VI tenor and metal mild domed in my soprano. The tenor is a slightly darker sound, but will shift with a mouthpiece designed to be bright. The metal on the soprano seem to be a little more versatile on a soft mellow VS rowdy blues sound. The other interesting fact is the plastic is lighter and allows slightly quicker key action. The springs are designed to lift the lighter plastic. Both are hard surfaces that the sound wave bounces off while traveling through the body of the horn. The higher dome will cause a slightly more forward focused sound. Also with larger diameter resonators, less pad is exposed and there’s less absorption of the sound wave. If you have no resonators, the sound is soft and mild since it’s absorbed.
Are you saying your tenor has a darker sound than your soprano?🤔
 

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Are you saying your tenor has a darker sound than your soprano?🤔
Sorry, I’m saying as a tenor, it’s a little darker than my friend’s 56 with metal domed res. My soprano is a little more focused than the others I’ve played. Not comparing the tenor to the soprano.
 

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Sorry, I’m saying as a tenor, it’s a little darker than my friend’s 56 with metal domed res. My soprano is a little more focused than the others I’ve played. Not comparing the tenor to the soprano.
In a comparison of any two horns, one will be darker. If it happens to have nylon resonators, then that must be the reason.

Well, either that or something else.
 

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In a comparison of any two horns, one will be darker. If it happens to have nylon resonators, then that must be the reason.

Well, either that or something else.
And before you earned your doctorate, you gave advice on all things asked. In Delphi and your name started with O. But there was no protection for that name, otherwise Larry Ellison would have never picked it for his company.

Bottom line: two thumbs up, you just made my day - when I needed it!
 

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JS Crescent, JS NOS, Selmer SBA, Couf Superba I, Conn, Buescher, King
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What kind of Resonators do you have in your horn/horns....?

Plastic or Metal (or just rivets) and why your choice of either....

Domed or flat and why ??

Me ...Baritone Conn 1920- flat metal as Conn often are and to increase projection.Roo's for quieter action.

47' The Martin Tenor-Flat Metal to be original.

35-39'? La Fleur Alto Domed Metal with Rivets-my first overhaul had no idea what to use....

Thought of this poll because of a aversion to plastic resonators ,well plastic in general...and it is everywhere.
All of it -- type, size, distribution of sizes -- depends on the horn and the goal for that horn.

And the same set-up that does one thing for one player can sometimes do the opposite for another.

There is really a lot to this question/topic, and it's not only a lot that applies in general terms but also that varies a great deal, within those more general patterns, on a personal level.

That said, the bottom line is that -- maybe with the exception of "Hollywood"/"Noyek" -- as long as the installation overall is done well and the horn is regulated well, most people will be happy with whatever they get, even hard modern pads with no resonator. It's just that they may be a little more happy if the resonator set-up matches that horn in a way that brings out what they want to experience from it personally.

Overall, this is my experience, but what is best again varies according to the make/model and the player and the desired musical goal: larger resonators give a quicker response. Brown nylon have a little less sustain; domed nickel plated metal have a little more sustain; bare brass, handmade on a lathe, are not necessarily "brighter" than brown nylon; flat are a little more "locked-in" intonationally than domed on Conn, but you will notice this difference more on some makes (e.g. Conn) than on others, and overall it's a very slight difference, slighter than difference in the edges of the sound that will register as a difference in "resonance," but again even that is very slight; the skin of the pad matters, too (Bueschers with snap-ins that pull the skin very tight seem to play like horns with larger resonators, even though the snaps themselves have smaller surface area than most modern set-ups will employ). On some horns where the core of the sound, and less the extreme high or low partials, are what the owner will want, I'll recommend brown nylon (often the case for Selmer, Martin Committee, Buffet SDA, Yana, etc., where the player is looking for the center of the sound to be the primary experience), whereas for players who want more "resonance" (which partly means more "sustain") I may recommend domed nickel-plated Pisoni, unless they don't want a flexible pitch center, in which case it may be safer to go with flat metal.

Many will note the use of the words "seems," "may," etc. This is really just opinion, based on repeated experience, and one thing that experience doesn't include is many overhauls I did completely without resonators, because, in short, only one or two people have ever asked for that in 20 years.
 

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To reinforce your assessment, there was a study done at McGill Univerdity in Montreal. Net-net is blind perceptional study is that horns with resonators esker to play and brighter. No one could tell the difference between the same horn with metal and plastic resonators.

Well, yeah, but without reading that study in detail yet, that type of study tends to point out the limits of the way it's possible to study this type of question, though always with also useful things about ways one might go about it. They point out both.

Just on the first page, the graph presented kind of underlines how really UN-scientific that study is. How was A/B (before/after repadding calibrated and measured to assure that the necessity of "other things being equal" actually does present an "equality"? It's unlike that "other things" are in fact equal.

Not saying the studies aren't useful. They are. They're just not really decisive about anything. Until you get a bunch of artists who are also scientists, and legit at both, you're just going to have the same round-robin repetitive yay/nay stuff that has dominated this site, and that's really about larger personality types in conflict, as ever.

Doing an A/B with "before/after" around a pad change, without pretty stringent calibration of what the content of "other things being equal" means, is a joke. I think any competent tech would recognize this.

For the time being, IMO, we're kind of limited in answering questions like this for ourselves to exactly what you're seeing on this thread (statements of experience, not fact), including the citing of that link, which is probably why this discussion tends to take the same course over and over, even after 20 years of them doing that, and doing it specifically here (i.e. SOTW, where it's been recycled going back to the days when SOTW was mounted on Swirve).
 

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I own six horns and only two have plastic brown dome resos and i say they have a different color to it's tone so i guess i don't prefer one over the other.
my other four horns have metal domed resos and just sound closer to the sound i hear and want.
Selmer brown plastic tone booster resonators are by far the best sounding pads. There is a difference and metal ain't good for a sax; it has enough on it to add to the pads some more....
 

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Selmer brown plastic tone booster resonators are by far the best sounding pads. There is a difference and metal ain't good for a sax; it has enough on it to add to the pads some more....
What the ???
 
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I don't know much about pads. I have done a re-pad using cheap Chinese pads on one of my tenors. Sounds OK.
As a special Birthday present, I'm having Pisoni pads installed on another of my tenors. These are supposed to be good. Can anyone explain why?
 

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Hahaha; come on, can't I stir the pot a little on this?
Of course, that's what we do at SotW. Why do you say that Selmer resonators are the best pads? Resos and pads are two different objects. Do you have anything new to add to the topic?
 

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I don't know much about pads. I have done a re-pad using cheap Chinese pads on one of my tenors. Sounds OK.
As a special Birthday present, I'm having Pisoni pads installed on another of my tenors. These are supposed to be good. Can anyone explain why?
Good leather, good felt, good attention paid to making a consistent product. I have them in several of my horns and they hold up well to years of playing.

Happy birthday!
 
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