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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey would anyone mind posting a couple of sound files of you playing your Yanasigawa and Antigua soprano (if you happen to have both)? I'm trying to get an idea of what one sounds like as compared to the other.
 

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sinebar: I have both but not a clue as to how to create a sound file OR how to post it if I had one.

But let me offer a little advice - they would do you no good. Listening to such a thing is entertainment only - only mildly interesting.

Everyone plays differently and produces different sounds from each horn. Listening to a recording of someone else playing ANYTHING is probably the LEAST valid method to make a decision (or solve the dilemma you have going on right now) about which horn to buy.

Plus, a horn's tone is but one of many important facets of its playability. I've posted before that I prefer the sound of my Antigua over my Yanagisawa. But that doesn't tell the whole story and even if it did, the two horn's tone-differences are extremely subtle, so much so that I doubt if anyone listening would pick up on it.

Once I put the Antigua down and pick up the Yanagisawa, it takes about two measures to make me forget the Antigua. It is the feel and response more so than the sound - both sound good, I just prefer the Antigua's, but that is really splitting hairs. Overall, I'll take the Yanagisawa every time. DAVE
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Dave Dolson said:
sinebar: I have both but not a clue as to how to create a sound file OR how to post it if I had one.

But let me offer a little advice - they would do you no good. Listening to such a thing is entertainment only - only mildly interesting.

Everyone plays differently and produces different sounds from each horn. Listening to a recording of someone else playing ANYTHING is probably the LEAST valid method to make a decision (or solve the dilemma you have going on right now) about which horn to buy.

Plus, a horn's tone is but one of many important facets of its playability. I've posted before that I prefer the sound of my Antigua over my Yanagisawa. But that doesn't tell the whole story and even if it did, the two horn's tone-differences are extremely subtle, so much so that I doubt if anyone listening would pick up on it.

Once I put the Antigua down and pick up the Yanagisawa, it takes about two measures to make me forget the Antigua. It is the feel and response more so than the sound - both sound good, I just prefer the Antigua's, but that is really splitting hairs. Overall, I'll take the Yanagisawa every time. DAVE
Thanks Dave, The Antiqua I ordered didn't come saturday and I'm thinking seriously about ordering the Yana S901. I heard one on youtube that sounded great but have yet to hear a AW.
 

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Dave Dolson said:
That great soprano sound comes from the player. DAVE
Well, I was gonna volunteer to record my 586BC, but not after that comment! :shock:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
fballatore said:
Well, I was gonna volunteer to record my 586BC, but not after that comment! :shock:
Please don't let that stop you. I'm sure you will sound great.
 

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I have both sopranos, know how to record and post to the web and refuse to do it. Absolutely worthless. Both horns will sound stellar. If you have the money, the Yani's very nice. If not the AW is excellent too. Guess what, I sound like me on both instruments.

The difference between the two is so small as not to be even statistically interesting. But that's just my opinion. Try them both and find out which one floats your boat.
 

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Gandalfe said:
I have both sopranos, know how to record and post to the web and refuse to do it. Absolutely worthless. Both horns will sound stellar. If you have the money, the Yani's very nice. If not the AW is excellent too. Guess what, I sound like me on both instruments.

The difference between the two is so small as not to be even statistically interesting. But that's just my opinion. Try them both and find out which one floats your boat.
I played a Yani in a lesson with my teacher who played an Antigua the other day and I preferred the sound of me on my Yani, but that could be due to any number of factors, and is not a legitimate basis for selecting one over the other.

I owned a recent model Antigua (586?) and really liked the sound a lot, but sold it because I felt that the metal was too soft on it. You can tell because the longer rods have some give to them. You can also tell because it was almost impossible to remove the neck after putting it on because the metal had flexed into the screwed in position and had stayed there.

The sound difference may not be of any statistical interest, but the build quality of a Yanagisawa is very perceptibly different to me, but then of course that is why a Yana is going to cost more. If you are not so concerned about the build quality of an Antigua and are attracted by the cost savings, then the Antigua is the way to go.

If there is any way you can afford a Yana, I would highly recommend buying one. If not, you could be very very happy with the Antigua. If you do go with an Antigua, one thing you might want to do is get a Pro Tec case and just leave the neck on all the time. That would resolve the biggest issue I had with my Antigua.

I love my Yana SC901 now though and have no desire for any other soprano. Any difference in sound between a Yanagisawa and Antigua either real or imagined is not a good basis for a choice in my book.

Good luck with your decision!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Pigpen said:
I played a Yani in a lesson with my teacher who played an Antigua the other day and I preferred the sound of me on my Yani, but that could be due to any number of factors, and is not a legitimate basis for selecting one over the other.

I owned a recent model Antigua (586?) and really liked the sound a lot, but sold it because I felt that the metal was too soft on it. You can tell because the longer rods have some give to them. You can also tell because it was almost impossible to remove the neck after putting it on because the metal had flexed into the screwed in position and had stayed there.

The sound difference may not be of any statistical interest, but the build quality of a Yanagisawa is very perceptibly different to me, but then of course that is why a Yana is going to cost more. If you are not so concerned about the build quality of an Antigua and are attracted by the cost savings, then the Antigua is the way to go.

If there is any way you can afford a Yana, I would highly recommend buying one. If not, you could be very very happy with the Antigua. If you do go with an Antigua, one thing you might want to do is get a Pro Tec case and just leave the neck on all the time. That would resolve the biggest issue I had with my Antigua.

I love my Yana SC901 now though and have no desire for any other soprano. Any difference in sound between a Yanagisawa and Antigua either real or imagined is not a good basis for a choice in my book.

Good luck with your decision!
Yep that's the kind of thing I'm afraid of with cheaper horns and that's why I sent the Antiqua back. I realy like buying name brand stuff because then You are certain about the quality. In fact I just bought a YSS 475 II off ebay. The Antiqua seemed solid but I got the Yamaha slightly used for a little more than what would have paid for the AW.
 

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sinebar said:
Yep that's the kind of thing I'm afraid of with cheaper horns and that's why I sent the Antiqua back. I realy like buying name brand stuff because then You are certain about the quality. In fact I just bought a YSS 475 II off ebay. The Antiqua seemed solid but I got the Yamaha slightly used for a little more than what would have paid for the AW.
Congrats on the 475. If I were you I would just hang with that.

To follow up on what I said earlier, this week I only had my SML tenor with me at our weekly jam session and someone with an Antigua sop hanging around their neck and I got talking about horns. One thing this guy mentioned to me too was that he tried just leaving the neck on his Antigua, but then when he wanted to take it off, had to have it surgically (i.e. professionally) removed.

In a couple weeks I am going to sell my 1929 Buesher True Tone sop on ebay. I just don't play it anymore. It's a fine horn with outstanding intonation, I just like the comfort of the Yana curved sop more (probably partly due to my 3rd degree AC separation from a mountain biking fall) and don't need two sops. My point again is just that there is so much more than what can be learned from a sound clip of a horn.

I say that but then one reason I went with my Yana I got on ebay rather than a Rampone & Cassani sop was that I heard some sound clips I found off the R&C web page and couldn't figure out what all the fuss was about them. The Yana I got was half price of the new R&C I was looking at too.

One thing I've learned from buying and selling a lot of horns is that differences between horns are fairly subtle, but are there. Changing mouthpieces and reeds can have a much larger impact on your sound. If you are looking for a different sound, I would fool around with mpc & reed set ups.

Good luck with yours.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Pigpen said:
Congrats on the 475. If I were you I would just hang with that.

To follow up on what I said earlier, this week I only had my SML tenor with me at our weekly jam session and someone with an Antigua sop hanging around their neck and I got talking about horns. One thing this guy mentioned to me too was that he tried just leaving the neck on his Antigua, but then when he wanted to take it off, had to have it surgically (i.e. professionally) removed.

In a couple weeks I am going to sell my 1929 Buesher True Tone sop on ebay. I just don't play it anymore. It's a fine horn with outstanding intonation, I just like the comfort of the Yana curved sop more (probably partly due to my 3rd degree AC separation from a mountain biking fall) and don't need two sops. My point again is just that there is so much more than what can be learned from a sound clip of a horn.

I say that but then one reason I went with my Yana I got on ebay rather than a Rampone & Cassani sop was that I heard some sound clips I found off the R&C web page and couldn't figure out what all the fuss was about them. The Yana I got was half price of the new R&C I was looking at too.

One thing I've learned from buying and selling a lot of horns is that differences between horns are fairly subtle, but are there. Changing mouthpieces and reeds can have a much larger impact on your sound. If you are looking for a different sound, I would fool around with mpc & reed set ups.

Good luck with yours.
Your last statement makes sense because the Anitgua sounded a lot better when I replaced the rico reed and 4C mouth piece with better ones. I probably won't be able to tell any differance with the Yamaha but I just feel better more confident with a name brand.
 

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sinebar said:
Your last statement makes sense because the Anitgua sounded a lot better when I replaced the rico reed and 4C mouth piece with better ones. I probably won't be able to tell any differance with the Yamaha but I just feel better more confident with a name brand.
I haven't ever personally owned a Yamaha, but I do know people who have and have read a lot about them. The 486 will last a lifetime and have a much more trouble free existence than a horn of a less quality build. If you get tired of it's sound, fool around with mpcs and reeds. If that doesn't do it for you, try out some other horns down the road, and remember, actually differences in hornsare usually much less than the hype about them. That's what I've found anyway.

By the way, I just bought a Yanagisawas S901 on ebay this morning. As you may know, its a straight sop with no removable neck. What can I say, I thought the price was right and it may be more portable for me than my curved sop.

The last thing I want to say about Yamahas is that that is or was the soprano saxophone make that Wayne Shorter plays/played, and he's my favorite soprano sax player, so there you have it. Enjoy, and play with confidence!! All this talk has gotten me excited, I gotta pick up my horn now. Best wishes.
 
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