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Karsten Gloger has collected measurements of many original necks, and , contrary to what other brands do, makes different necks that are all as close a reproduction to the original as possible.

http://www.gloger-handkraft.com

" Karsten GlogerGloger-Handkraft necks are made by a process making it possible to make
an original curve. (99 % accuracy) So you can have your favorite model made in silver, copper or maybe even in gold."


After having started this way, to reproduce original neck the market demanded something different , neck alterations, therefore:

" The necks are available in different measurements. So you can have the neck of your choice, fitted to your existing instrument and create your own unique sound. You have the flexibility to fit a neck for example, with an "American Curve" on a Selmer sax or another make still play on your familiar mechanism. The result is better intonation throughout the instrument."


When I had my neck made for the Super 20 the only thing that was different was the silver that was 999/1000 while King necks were at best sterling (or coin later on).
 

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I took it to mean an alteration of the tenon to make the aftermarket neck actually fit.

If you buy an aftermarket neck and do any adjustment like that, bang goes your return policy or warranty. Just don't do it unless you get something from a company such as as Gloger that is deigned for your actual instrument.
At 99% accuracy ( his words) Karsten Gloger are the closest thing to original that you are ever going to get.

As for differences in manufacture it is obvious by the famous Selmer video that bending a neck (containing some form of semi soft melting material to prevent creasing) , manually, with a lever, around a mould, cannot achieve a degree of precision to insure that all the necks will be exactly the same.

Hydro-forming has more chances to achieve a higher degree of precision.

However, about precision, after I watched the video by Bob Magnusson I am absolutely baffled.

 

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Well, I think that that may be true of the baritones based on Selmer design but I am sure that things get a lot more complex when considering the replacement of the baritones of different design with an octave key on the neck.

The variation of factors (volume, length, position of the octave pip, opening of this) is too great a factor. But again, if one can cobble a neck made of copper tubing and make it work...
 

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Well, if one buys it very cheap it may be an option provided that they are instruments that have had at least some popularity in the past.

Gloger has measured hundreds of neck and has probably the most complete data bank on this matter in the world.

We have seen people buying obscure baritones (for some reason I have the impression that more baritones are missing their necks than any other horn) like Santoni made baritones, and then finding it near impossible to find an exact match.

I know of someone whom found a Couesnon baritone on the highway without a neck. He had been looking for a replacement for years (and wasn鈥檛 willing to buy an expensive neck from Gloger). When we spoke about this he had been looking for years and I have no reason to think that he ever found a replacement.

On a sideline. The last few years lots of so called Bundy Buescher replacement necks have appeared on ebay. I am not at all convinced that there was a pile of these 鈥 original鈥 necks waiting somewhere. Some are sold from the US but notably others are sold from China.
 

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if I were a Chinese maker and would have noticed the high prices for this (against the relative ease to make a neck) I would have been tempted to make 鈥 original鈥 parts.

If a neck sells for $200 which is often the cost of an entire Chinese made alto (where they come from) and you can sell a neck for the same price... what do you think that such an entrepreneur would think?
 

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Gone are the days of limited choices and thrifty attitude, it is precisely to offer a degree of variation in his sales ( and generate a lot more of those, methinks) that Gloger took to offer next to exact copies alternative designs to the original.

I think and thought at the time that this also opened up a different market to him.

There are many players (good or bad) out there whom are forever looking for the " je ne sais quoi " ( quite literally " I don't know what " ) by forever changing reeds, mouthpieces and, why not, I hear neck makers think, necks.

If you build...they will come ( and they do!). Those who seek will find what those who sell have made for them.

 

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Gloger tenor necks are 500Euros from what I saw on their website.
Yes, indeed, depending on size material and position of the octave key.

They can be bought directly from him, the wait is long. (click on the pic to expand)

Font Screenshot Software Display device Technology
 

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Not only. Any of these vendors whom aren鈥檛 makers may have sourced one day somewhere and then moved somewhere else.

I don鈥檛 know about Peter Ponzol鈥檚 necks, but he has certainly had production agreements with at least 3 different factories when it came to saxophones bearing his name.
 

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something tells me that enforcement wouldn鈥檛 be a priority
I bet that it is sufficient to identify the origin on the barcode of a product (which most people don鈥檛 even realize is there on the box)
 

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Paraschos is pretty much 鈥 sui generis鈥 and if you buy their product you are buying into the idea that ia paraschos neck produces a sound of its own (whether because it is made of wood or, as I believe, because it has a geometry dictated by the fact that it is wooden made). Wether this is an improvement over the standard neck remains to be seen , case by case.

The Paraschos family has to be one of the nicest group of people in the musical instruments business. I absolutely respect their ethos and way of working. They provide you with something of the outmost quality but you have to like the product and the concept.
 

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I don鈥檛 think they make specific necks for specific horns (aside their first target horn, the Yanagisawas). At least that wasn鈥檛 the case back then, when I met them in Frankfurt.

They have their own concept which was originally, I believe , developed with and for Yanagisawa. Paraschos was and still is their importer in Greece and they were asked by Yanagisawa to make wooden necks , which they did, then they took it from there when people asked then to fit these necks onto other saxophones.
 

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Collecting saxophones is a very different predicament than using a saxophone for what its intended use really is.

So if the collector cares about "originality" tout court of course none of the things that didn't come with the saxophone when new belong with it. Paradoxically not even an identical replacement. Still all major companies do sell replacement parts, including necks.

Anyway the discussion on whether something like a new, aftermarket neck, could improve the saxophone performance is a rather academic one because we all agree that different mouthpieces are important for all manner of reasons and attribute tonal and intonational qualities to the sound and yet there is no one whom really thinks that there is a " proper" mouthpiece to play with any given horn or an " improper" one.

I think that if we accept that different people may want to change to an alternative mouthpiece compared to what the company may have considered to be the standard with which they adjusted the sound of the entire system, then anyone may similarly change a neck too.

The proof of this kind of pudding is in the eating. If it works and you are happy with it, so be it.
 

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Never understood those.

They are not an exact copy but they offer the plus of fitting mouthpieces on multiple horns with the same, non original, neck. Very expensive.

Profitability in these things much depends on how efficient is the manufacture process used.
 

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another possibility is (but it would change completely the sax) to get a matching set of tenon receiver as sold by some shops ( Ferree鈥檚?) and replace the double socket receiver and then put the matching tenon on a neck of your choice.

A shop did this for me some time ago on a different sax than yours. They had the tenon receiver sets, perfectly matching.
 
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