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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I just recently purchased a 1961 Conn 10M from a member on SOTW. I had the horn shipped directly to my tech in Wisconsin, and will be picking up the horn (after some minor work) on Saturday. I called to ask for first impressions, and overall, mechanically she was fairly sound, just needing some adjustment and a couple new pads. Most of the small conn adjustment screws were missing, however, making the action a bit off.

The main issue with the horn is the neck. Neither my tech or I have played the horn yet, so it may not be an issue at all, but my tech described the neck as "a bit bumpy" and possibly the victim of some pulldown or other damage. Quite possibly, this might not be an issue and the horn will sound great. Equally as possible, it may be a major issue. So, what are my options?

Even after a $100 or so of repair work, I can still get my money out of the horn, so I plan on replacing mechanically what needs to be done.

What would a replacement neck cost? Will only a neck off of a 10M work? Am I better off with an original or new neck? (ie. gloger or something). Must be double-socket. Would a Pan-American neck work?
 

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Does your horn take the double socket neck? That would be hard to find.

Otherwise, a neck off a cheap Conn 16M or even another American horn might work.

Vintage tenor necks are rare and therefore expensive.

It would save you a lot of trouble if you can repair the neck you have. Pull down can be fixed. The 10M is a great horn -- even the later ones like yours. Check some prices online to get an idea. I don't think spending a couple of hundred is bad to keep up a vintage horn of such value.


You can message me if you like. I may be slow in getting back to you, but I am struggling with the same problem myself. So I'll be interesting in exchanging ideas.


Crescent.
 

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In my experience, any Conn neck will work, and many others, also. Measure the tenon and search places like eBay. It takes time and money to find good necks. Not all necks are created equal - two that look identical can have very different intonation. Ugly ones can sometimes sound great. I have spare necks that will fit dimensionally. PM me, if you wish.

What matters is the intonation, not the appearance. Play the neck with a good tuner and take notes. Play it, record it and see if you like the sound. If you like the sound, there's nothing to do.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I like the sound! I was worried at first when I heard the initial report about the neck, but I've been very pleased with how it plays. The neck does have some very interesting Martin-esque modifications, but plays great!
 

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When you get the horn in hand, warm it up, tune it to your liking, then play in the neighborhood around low D... nice and soft... ppp... and hold the notes for a while. If this is no problem, kiss the neck and cherish it.
 
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