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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi folks, I know how to silver solder using oxy ect but is there actually a difference with soldering these back on. How do they do it at the factory, Im assuming they sweat it on or something along those lines.
 

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posts are soft soldered in position, make sure that both surfaces are clean and de greased, apply flux and clamp/wire the post into position using the key it holds in place as a jig so that it is in the correct position, cut a tiny piece of solder and place at the foot of the post where it touches the body. apply heat using a hand held butane/gas torch. be prepared for the lacquer to scorch - if it doesnt its a bonus. clean area thoroughly with mild soapy water and rinse. remove any excess solder.

some people have different methods of soldering

eg - "tinning" applying solder to the base of the post - letting it go cold and then positioning the post as described above and then applying heat.

some prefer to use thin ribbon solder and placing it under the post and then heating.

I use "stay - brite" lead and cadmium free solder kit which comes with a 1 foot roll of solder and a flux dispenser. this stuff takes a very slightly higher temp to melt but it does not tarnish and stays bright - ideal for silver instruments.

hope this is of some help
 

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you're welcome mate, no problems, you will need to use a flame though to heat the post , a soldering iron will melt the solder but ill not get the post or the body hot enought for the solder to bond, and yes the solder is roughly the same as plumbers solder.

please make sure that you use the key as a jig to get the post in position and use the pivot screw or key rod in the post. also make sure that any keys with pads, cork or felt that are near the area that you want to solder are removed otherwise they will get burnt.

If you need any more advice just holler.
 

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simso said:
... I genuinly wouldnt have thought solder which is the same as used from soldering irons ect would have been strong enough to hold a post, ...
That's why the post's mounting rib has a large surface area. The post itself is often (usually?) silver-soldered to the mounting rib.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks guys worked a treat. I actually have a heat gun which goes up to 600 deg c, and it worked perfect. Appreciated.
One more question if I may, when you put a new pad on, how do you guys test if its sealing/seated properly, do you just do a light test. I changed a couple of pads about 9 on the wifes alto clarinet, and they all appear to seat neatly but she now reckons its hard to blow G1 I hope thats the right ref point its the g at the top of the bass clef. Any recommendations on how to ensure they have seated correctly
Thanks
Steve
 

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good link from clarnibass that gives a better description than I ever could.

as far as clarinets go - and the larger the clarinet the harder this becomes - I use rubber bungs and bung the bottom of each joint closed.
then take each joint at a time and finger the keys so that all the pads are shut - then I blow down the open end - this is a great indicator if any pads are leaking or if any springs are weak.

you can use your hand to seal the bottom of each joint but I prefer the bung as it then leaves the other hand free to press on any pads in order to find the leak.

I always follow up blowing or leak lights with the good old feeler gauge - cigarrette paper - to make sure that I havent missed anything.

It is not always the pad that causes the leak , it could be a compressed cork/hycotex/felt/ whatever linkage material thats too thin or thick or it could be a regulation screw under or over regulated, a weak spring, amongst other things.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Thankyou, I found the light test showed no problem, but I just went and did the rolly paper test and found that the rear lower stack key was closing on three of the four sides and not the inner edge, which also masked the light shine.
 

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as well as replacing a pad - if you have a pad that, like the one you removed, isnt sealing alll the way round or is not sealing with equal pressure all the way round you can place something in between the pad and the tonehole - (i use a tool that I made from a butter knife -you could even used a reed as its tapered ) - place it on the opposite side of the leak or where the pressure is stronger and then bend the key down over the leak or the weaker side. test with the paper/ feeler material until equal pressure all round the pad is achieved - IMHO it is very important, when checking for leaks, that minimum pressure is applied and the correct fingering is used ie when checking pads for leaks use the finger buttons/touchpieces to press down the keys and not press the key cup down with your fingers.


I like Gordon tend to bend a little further and then bend back.
 

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simso said:
... I found the light test showed no problem, but...
We are talking about an alto clarinet here. I trust a leak light only for saxes, and metal instruments with non-translucent pads, that do not have a very deep seat, i.e rarely on other woodwinds. IMO the black timber of most clarinets absorbs too much light to leave enough for a reliable test.

"...When I tested with the rolly paper it just slid straight out on that one side.."

If it just slid out, then that constitutes a large leak. When we use a feeler to test, we are working to a precision that compares drag, while there is very little closing pressure exerted on the key. I.e we are finding leaks that are quite a lot thinner than the thickness of the feeler. A typical feeler is 0.02 mm (less than 1 'thou') but sometimes down to half that.

"... but the corner of a card from a deck of cards shimmed just nice"

And a playing card is about 15 times thicker than a typical feeler.

Different people work to different degrees of precision. :shock: :) :!:

I'm glad your wife is happy.
 
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