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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Everyone,

I had a spring break on the post which holds the E key on my Buescher alto yesterday. I thought it would be no big deal to replace the spring since I have several replacement norton springs from Ferrees and I've replaced one before. The problem I have run into is that the new spring can not be screwed in far enough to be flush with the post. That's critical on this post because the F linkage key must be flush with this post and the spring is preventing that. Any ideas? I looked at the old spring and compared it to the new spring and the old spring is tapered at the end like a bullet. I'm guessing that's the difference.

Thanks
 

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Of course you may want use something like a thread locker if you do either of these mods, since there needs to be a locked in position given to the spring to keep it from rotating. maybe only running the threads partially , but stop just short of bringing the threaded portion down to size, leaving it a bit thicker at the end, giving enough resistance in the last turn or so to help the screw portion to lock in place?
 

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Saxdaddy said:
Of course you may want use something like a thread locker if you do either of these mods, since there needs to be a locked in position given to the spring to keep it from rotating. maybe only running the threads partially , but stop just short of bringing the threaded portion down to size, leaving it a bit thicker at the end, giving enough resistance in the last turn or so to help the screw portion to lock in place?

I agree. It's also possible to spread the die a little to offer resistance. The originals have a very small non-threaded part that is just a bit smaller then the replacements.
 

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Maybe the original spring threads in the post were not tapped all the way through, or there are some burrs or plating build up in the far end causing the spring to not install fully? :?
 

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I think its just the difference between the real Nortons and Ferree's replacements for them. The Ferree's ones stick out farther on the butt end because of how they are built, which isn't too big of a deal except in a case like this poster where there isn't any clearance.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks

Thanks to everyone for your helpful info. I decided on trying the option of cutting the extra length from the screw and creating a new slot. I was able to cut the screw to the right size and to create a new slot. I didn't want to try modifying the post at all because I figured if I messed up I could always get another screw but not another post. So just about the point where the screw was in far enough one side of the new screw slot broke off. It turned out OK because the screw doesn't stick out far enough anymore to cause problems and I can reassemble the instrument. However, the person who has to replace that screw after me isn't going to be very happy because without a screw slot I don't see how they are going to be able to get the screw out of that post.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks

Thanks to everyone for your helpful info. I decided on trying the option of cutting the extra length from the screw and creating a new slot. I was able to cut the screw to the right size and to create a new slot. I didn't want to try modifying the post at all because I figured if I messed up I could always get another screw but not another post. So just about the point where the screw was in far enough one side of the new screw slot broke off. It turned out OK because the screw doesn't stick out far enough anymore to cause problems and I can reassemble the instrument. However, the person who has to replace that screw after me isn't going to be very happy because without a screw slot I don't see how they are going to be able to get the screw out of that post.
 

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Possibly grab the spring with suitable pliers and unscrew.
Possibly cut a new slot using a very small burr in a dental handpiece, carefully so as not to damage the post.
Some technicians saw across the end of the post until they have also sawed a slot in the screw. !!!!!!!!

I suspect you compromised the strength of the head by cutting a slot that was a fraction unnecessarily wide.

A cheap coping saw with the waviness ground off the blade where the teeth are, is ideal.
 
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