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Forum Contributor 2010-2017
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Discussion Starter #1
I have slightly mashed the head of the B, C# adjustment screw on my sax (as in a previous post) does anyone know where I can buy this replacement screw for a Yani A991, just in so I have one to replace before the top gets too damaged?
 

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Forum Contributor 2007-2012, Distinguished SOTW Te
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Any Conn-Selmer dealer can order it for you. Expect a wait of a few weeks at least, and might as well order two while you are it it because the shipping costs will remain the same for two and then you'll have an extra (these are the same adjustment screw that does the G#/bis adjustment arm, right?). Shoot, might as well get a neck screw at the same time.


PS: As a Yanagisawa owner, you might be interested to see the Yanagisawa factory tour photos on my website below. I also did a writeup here on SOTW that ended up being posted on Yanagisawa's English-language homepage.
 

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You might also try the repair department of the music store where you bought the sax (if that's where you got it). They will often have a stock of the most needed parts for the brands the store sells and they service on a regular basis.
 

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Maybe you're already set on getting a new screw but FWIW: If there's no real problem with the screw itself and only the head/slot is a bit messed up, it is probably possible to just re-slot it. Very fast and easy. Cheaper too unless replacement is for free under warrenty. Much faster too if screw is not in stock.
 

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Mount the screw in a drill chuck and recut the slot with a junior hacksaw while stationary, then while it's spinning you can file the head to tidy it up, then smooth it down with emery and polish to a bright shine. You can then degrease it and paint the head with clear nail varnish to stop it tarnishing if you like.

Older student/intermediate model Yanagisawa saxes had black plastic adjusting screws for the long Bb, F#-G# and low B-C# linkages and the heads on these are delicate to say the least.
 

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Forum Contributor 2010-2017
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Discussion Starter #6
You might also try the repair department of the music store where you bought the sax (if that's where you got it). They will often have a stock of the most needed parts for the brands the store sells and they service on a regular basis.
Good suggestion!
 

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Forum Contributor 2007-2012, Distinguished SOTW Te
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Oh, and I just noticed you are in the UK. Not sure who the Yanagisawa distributor is there, but if you decide you want OEM parts (although just reslotting is much easier and all you really need, as Nitai says above) just replace Conn-Selmer with Your-Distributor.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I don't understand, wouldn't reslotting make it 'shorter'?

Also was just looking at the screw, how would you get it off? Looks like it has a lip to keep it on?

Thanks
 

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I don't understand, wouldn't reslotting make it 'shorter'?

Also was just looking at the screw, how would you get it off? Looks like it has a lip to keep it on?

Thanks
It can tolerate being a little shorter. Once it's adjusted correctly it will never have to move that much.

If it has a plate fitted to the bottom of the adjuster you'll have to screw it down and out.

Regards,
 

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Discussion Starter #10
That makes sense, and do they come with the cork (it looks like cork anyway) bit already on or is that cut out and glued on later? Sorry, just curious now!

Screw is probably fine for now, I'll just change it if it becomes really problematic.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
So you'd cut out the cork and glue it on like described in your book? (sounds waay too fiddly, might try some recording on my student sax sometime as practice tho)
 

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So you'd cut out the cork and glue it on like described in your book? (sounds waay too fiddly, might try some recording on my student sax sometime as practice tho)
Yep. It's not too fiddly - though the job is a little easier if you have one of those multi-headed hole punch thingies, which would allow you to cut out a neat disc of cork or felt.
Otherwise you'll have to glue a piece of cork on and cut it round once fitted.

Regards,
 

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As a side note boehm make a really really nice hole punch set for cutting felt caps for trumpets, the inner and outer hole punches can be switched or used individually, makes cutting felts for sax's a breeze, dont buy discs just buy sheet and cut what you need out of it as you go, same applies for corks and cork pads

For info the girls at the local schools love personalising there trumpets, they have them servced and ask for specific colours on the caps, hot pink is a favorite, I also get similiar requests on silver plated sax's ""hot pink""
 

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To speed up work, and keep work tidy, I have collected quite an array of different types of punches to make small circles of felt, cork, etc. 52 diameters between 2 and 20 mm.

These have a limited size range, but are fantastic! The punch part is a very thin walled stainless steel tube. I believe they are used to take tissue samples in medical laboratories.
Go to http://www.emsdiasum.com/microscopy/products/preparation/slice.aspx#69036 and scroll down to the bottom of the page, where there is a photo of colour-coded punches called "Harris Unicore 69036"

There is a huge range of useful stuff outside what is available from our conventional suppliers.
 

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Thanks for that link Gordon. This "misinformation site" sure has some good information.:mrgreen:

I have also made up a few oval punches by turning a piece of brass tubing to a sharp cutting edge and then hammering the sides to an oval shape. I find these useful to cut very thin felt or teflon to glue to the saddles that support the long rods of keys to quiet the action and remove any friction. Having the right size oval to begin with eliminates the need to trim the edges when installed.

Lately I've been using the JLSmith thin synthetic felt with a dab of teflon powder for this purpose. It has proven to be quieter than the teflon sheet, and it looks nice as well. In fact I may have learned this from you, I don't remember.
 

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Yes, you may well have learnt that from me. Piano technicians use it a lot, for their felt bearings.

Great idea for making an oval punch. So simple! I intend to use it for cutting ovals of Music Center's "microfiber", synthetic sax pad leather for silencers between throat G & G# keys on clarinet, on models where there is not enough flat surface to glue a strip or trapezium of the material. An oval flows over the sides without lifting, better than does a rectangle, which tends to lift at the corners.

Ovals could be good for clarinet linkage silencer skins too.

"This "misinformation site" sure has some good information." :)
 

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Piano technicians use it a lot, for their felt bearings.
It may be terminology but what is a felt bearing, Ive repaired / tuned many a piano and never heard that phrase before.. are we talking front and balance rail felts (punchings)
 

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I made a few cutters out of steel rod drilled with 2 different diameters (one at each end) then tapered the ends with a file on the lathe - I periodically pop them back on the lathe for a quick sharpen when necessary.

I have also got a set similar to this but metric. http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/12PC-STEEL-HO...UK_Crafts_Leathercraft_LE&hash=item3a5bcc4f68
they can also be sharpened on the lathe with a file.

I like the oval cuter idea and will be making one this week cheers for the tip jbtsax !
 

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JBT, If you're going to go to the effort of making your own cutter, why brass??? Way too soft to bother with IMO. The edge will just keep turning over. It would have been a lot easier to,

A: Cut an oval one half at a time using a wood/lino cutter like these

http://www.lawrence.co.uk/acatalog/Individual_Tools.html

or, If you can't find the size or shape you want, grab a piece of steel and use your torch to forge your own cutter as required.

It's fun, not too difficult, and at least you've got a tool that will hold an edge and last.

As an added benefit, you get to check out all the info on forging and tempering in that other spring thread. :)

As an afterthought, it's worth adding that if you want to go ahead and use the brass punch, the old adage "punch on pine, set on steel" applies. A soft pine board will keep your punch in better shape than a rubber mat or a hardwood workbench.
 
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