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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone here made their own repair stand? If so, would you be willing to give suggestions on materials and design?

Thanks for input!
 

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JS Crescent, JS NOS, Selmer SBA, Couf Superba I, Conn, Buescher, King
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To this day, for most rack uses, I still use a table leg, in a vise, wrapped with padding and cotton cloth for altos and tenors, and a different diameter table leg for sopranos. I guess I'm a caveman.
 

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To this day, for most rack uses, I still use a table leg, in a vise, wrapped with padding and cotton cloth for altos and tenors, and a different diameter table leg for sopranos. I guess I'm a caveman.
I guess that makes me a lapman. I re-orient a sax dozens of times during servicing, and find it far quicker to do this with it sitting on my lap. I sit down of course!
 

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I built my bench so that I can work standing or sitting (I use a tall chair with wheels). I'd be a "lap man" but, because I stand most of the time, I never need to put it in my lap. The Work Stations take too long to adjust and it's hard to get some of the fine angles I need to do the work.
 

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FWIW, I've found that while working on a sax I move and turn it in many different ways, sometimes very small angle changes, etc. that a stand like that would significantly slow down or even prevent me from doing. So I prefer not to use a stand.
 
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Yeah I find the best results are achieved when the sax is carefully placed on the ground and I stand on the table. Then once I've lept off the table and both of my boots have landed forcefully on top of the sax, then and only then is the job completely finished. This is often followed by a great sigh of relief! :->
 

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FWIW, I've found that while working on a sax I move and turn it in many different ways, sometimes very small angle changes, etc. that a stand like that would significantly slow down or even prevent me from doing. So I prefer not to use a stand.
You will note, I only use my stands nowadays for final adjustments and regulations. Stripping cleaning are all done on the bench
 

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JS Crescent, JS NOS, Selmer SBA, Couf Superba I, Conn, Buescher, King
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I guess that makes me a lapman. I re-orient a sax dozens of times during servicing, and find it far quicker to do this with it sitting on my lap. I sit down of course!
Same, back before I went the route Les describes & made myself a good sturdy table at the right height to stand while I work (or sit on a barstool type of chair)!

I have to say, one major advantage of working with the horn flat on a table these days (over a towel, usually) is no more horns hanging off my thigh by a spring! One of the perks of lapmanhood I can do without for the foreseeable future....
 

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Careless! :)

My back does not allow me to stand relatively motionless for long periods, like 20 minutes. I suppose that's what I get for trying to do gymnastics without expert guidance as a kid.
 

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The stand works for me when i am leveling the tone holes, and not much more than that.

I am adapting my stand (just for the fun) to have more support on the body and bell, so i can stop thinking about the pressure (not much) i am making on the body of the sax when leveling.
 

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When levelling I support the body from behind each relevant tone hole. If I used a stand for this I would expect the sax body to flex a little during the operation, distorting the tone hole more than necessary.
 
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