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Hi all, I recently acquired a used P.Mauriat System 76 Gold Lacquered from one of my friends for a really good price, While I am loving it, all of my other horns that I own are all a bare brass/unlacquered type finish and I would like the same for this horn if possible, while I know P.Mauriat does offer a unlacqured model, I don't think I have the time or money to go and resell this horn and spend more to get that model. My question is, do you think a tech could possibly remove the lacquer from this horn? I have another friend who did this with his SA80 because he believed it gave it more of a open and spread sound which i somewhat agree with it but I just mainly like the look, I also heard from somebody else that on some of the modern horns it is hard to remove the lacer because they use a really thick type of lacquer , I don’t really know if that is true or not. So do you guys think it is possible? Thanks!!
 

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Well relacquering this or any other horn would require a total disassembling and a lot of work which equals a LOT of money. Since you obviously want to remove lancquer on the keycups there are good chances that you will damage the pads and so , probably, you need to replace pads too.

VERY expensive and or time consuming. Anyone doing this for you will ask you a considerable amount of money. lacquer cannot do anything to the sound of the horn, if it would your horn should resonate as a bell, instead, you hit it with a mallet and you hear a THUD, because there is nothing to resonate.

But that aside, your project will cost a lot of money unless you do it yourself but the expertise needed would be above and beyond your capabilities or your would have done without asking any questions.

Modern horns use a different type of lacquer ( not necessarily thicker) and this is more difficult to remove then the old nitrocellulose, in fact it will also need a certain amount of buffing or abundant use of steel wool, which is also expensive to have it done and will remove some metal (let alone the possibility to break springs or unsolder posts which need being replaced or resolder)

I really think that you are better off leaving the horn like that, because chances are that you are going to spend WAY more money in having the work done that you would by selling this and buying an unlacquered horn.


There are many many threads on the unlacquering procedure and not so long ago there was someone whom wanted to give a Patina to a new P.Mauriat much like yours.

https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?232157-Lacquer-removal
https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?95624-Removing-Lacquer
https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?162639-Lacquer-stripping-process
https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?1715-removing-lacquer


AND many many more
 

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I de-lacquered a Mark VII years ago. I disassembled the horn, and wiped it down with lacquer thinner using a combination of rags, q-tips. Came right off. I would be worried that modern lacquers might be epoxy or some other modern equivilent which could be a nightmare to remove. Call and talk to Mauriat to see what they use.
 

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Acetone will strip it right off.
Please also include comments regarding the hazards of using acetone. I doubt that the OP even knows how to spell MSDS.
 

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Please also include comments regarding the hazards of using acetone. I doubt that the OP even knows how to spell MSDS.
Well, I think the side of the can has a bunch of information on safe use. You can buy acetone at any paint or hardware store, so it's not like we're talking about uranium hexafluoride here.

My main caution would be ventilation. Lots and lots of ventilation.
 

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Well, I think the side of the can has a bunch of information on safe use. You can buy acetone at any paint or hardware store, so it's not like we're talking about uranium hexafluoride here.

My main caution would be ventilation. Lots and lots of ventilation.
You can buy rat poison and chain saws, too. That doesn’t make them safe for everyone to use.
 

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You would use a non-aromatic stripper like 'Citri-Strip' rather than Acetone or MEK, etc. These are better for spot applications like removing Super Glue, etc. You should be able, as a sax player, to remove all the keys and put them back on without disturbing the 'set-up'. With all that, I have to say that simply asking the question indicates you will not be able to do this and consequently should not even start it, because you are going to get to a point where you want to put the parts in a bag and take it to the shop to finish. At that point its going to cost you more than if you had taken it to them in the first place.
Like already said, this kind of work typically requires at least a pad job if not an overhaul, although I have done it myself in the past without that. The fact is, not just anyone can undertake this job and have it come out to be presentable and not just a 'hot mess'.
In short, the job you want to do will most likely end up taking your nice horn and ruining it, so tread carefully.
 

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Feree’s Cold Strip but it probably won’t work on the newer lacquers.
The other option is play it a lot until it comes off. It doesn’t work with the instant gratification crowd
 

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I would just play it because first I dont think it makes one bit of difference. Second, as said above, you are likely to make a mess of a perfectly good horn.
 

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You would use a non-aromatic stripper like 'Citri-Strip' rather than Acetone or MEK, etc. These are better for spot applications like removing Super Glue, etc.
I doubt Cirti-strip would do the job on contemporary lacquer. It works OK on vintage lacqs, but even on them sometimes it takes repeated applications. It might ...but boy would it be very time consuming and probably quite frustrating...
Acetone will strip it right off.
Indeed it will do the job. As already suggested, a stripper which is not for the un-initiated or faint-of-heart....

With all that, I have to say that simply asking the question indicates you will not be able to do this and consequently should not even start it, because you are going to get to a point where you want to put the parts in a bag and take it to the shop to finish. At that point its going to cost you more than if you had taken it to them in the first place.
Like already said, this kind of work typically requires at least a pad job if not an overhaul, although I have done it myself in the past without that. The fact is, not just anyone can undertake this job and have it come out to be presentable and not just a 'hot mess'.
In short, the job you want to do will most likely end up taking your nice horn and ruining it, so tread carefully.
+1

Well relacquering this or any other horn would require a total disassembling and a lot of work which equals a LOT of money. Since you obviously want to remove lancquer on the keycups there are good chances that you will damage the pads and so , probably, you need to replace pads too.

VERY expensive and or time consuming. Anyone doing this for you will ask you a considerable amount of money. lacquer cannot do anything to the sound of the horn, if it would your horn should resonate as a bell, instead, you hit it with a mallet and you hear a THUD, because there is nothing to resonate.

But that aside, your project will cost a lot of money unless you do it yourself but the expertise needed would be above and beyond your capabilities or your would have done without asking any questions.

Modern horns use a different type of lacquer ( not necessarily thicker) and this is more difficult to remove then the old nitrocellulose, in fact it will also need a certain amount of buffing or abundant use of steel wool, which is also expensive to have it done and will remove some metal (let alone the possibility to break springs or unsolder posts which need being replaced or resolder)

I really think that you are better off leaving the horn like that, because chances are that you are going to spend WAY more money in having the work done that you would by selling this and buying an unlacquered horn.
Word.

Here's the thing...If done in a DIY manner it will come out terrible and be a very, very messy procedure. I have done this and can do this (I refurb for a living) but honestly I usually convince my clients to leave things be, just because even for me who has stripped around 20 horns down, it's just a royal pain.

If done professionally, it will cost a lotta $ because again, to do it right the pads need to be removed, really. Probably the regulating materials as well...

So either just adjust to the fact that one sax doesn't look like your others and enjoy the horn (perhaps THAT was the trade-off of getting this particular model for a really good price, eh ?)....

....or admit that a better path might have been not to purchase this horn but instead go look for the same model in the unlacquered finish ...
 

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Parsing to reveal the nuggets in the opening post:

Hi all, I recently acquired a used P.Mauriat System 76 Gold Lacquered from one of my friends for a really good price...
I don't think I have the time or money to go and resell this horn and spend more to get that model.
My question is, do you think a tech could possibly remove the lacquer from this horn?
Yes, a tech can do this job. As others have stated, it will include a full stripping of the horn, removal of pads, felts, and corks, chemical stripping, then repadding and assembly. All this will take a considerable amount of time and money.

I, too, suggest that you either accept it as-is, or sell the horn and wait until you find the one you want to look at, and hope that it plays as well (that cost you less money).
 

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I would just play it because first I dont think it makes one bit of difference. Second, as said above, you are likely to make a mess of a perfectly good horn.
Exactly. OP, you will kill any already-low resale value of that horn. Are you sure you like the right hand position on it? Play it for a while before doing any irreversible mods.
 

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Some good advice here already. I have removed the old spotty lacquer on several saxophones and given them a "brushed" finish. On older vintage instruments with nitrocellulose lacquer it is easily removed using hot water. It just peels off. The newer baked on epoxy lacquers are far more difficult to remove. I have had good success with brush on Aircraft Paint Remover, and also Ferree's Z21 lacquer remover. Yamaha lacquers are among the most difficult to remove using any method.

Looking at typical costs, to have a saxophone repadded including replacing materials, and removing and replacing springs can be $900 or more including the cost of pads. The cost to have a tech to completely remove the existing lacquer and redo the finish even at just $50/hr can be another $400 or more. Changing the finish on your saxophone can run $1300+.

I looked on Terapeak research and there were 9 P.Mauriat System 76 tenors both lacquered and unlacquered sold in the past 12 months. All were in excellent condition. The high was $2600 and the low $1950 with an average of $2266. If you were to list your saxophone and get the "average" price for it, the combined EBay and Pay Pal fees would cost you about $167. If you could get that price selling it locally you could avoid these costs and come close to an even trade of one finish for the other if you bought one with the finish you want at near the same price.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks for your advice guys I think I am just going to keep it the way it is never really realized it might ruin the horn.
 

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I think that was unnecessarily condescending to OP, besides being totally baseless. He could be a chemical engineer for all you know.
That would only reinforce my guess. Yes, I have worked with Ph.D. chemical engineers. :bluewink:

If he were a chemical engineer, why would he post such a question to a saxophone board? Wouldn't that be in the realm of chemical engineers?

Are YOU a Chem E??? :twisted:
 
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