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My old Zephyr has many spots of greenish corrosion (oxidation? not sure) on the body. How do I remove it without damage? How do I keep it from returning or spreading? Thanks.
 

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I personally dig the look of oxidation. It's terrible on my horn, but the horn looks like it has a story to tell.

Oxidation is a chemical reaction between the metal and oxygen. I don't think it's possible to remove unless you just plate over it.
 

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I agree with hornfixer. And if Brasso is not aggressive enough, start with fine sand paper, say 800 - 1200 grit.
 

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My old Zephyr has many spots of greenish corrosion (oxidation? not sure) on the body. How do I remove it without damage? How do I keep it from returning or spreading? Thanks.
If there are green spots all over the place, honestly.....have a tech chem-bathe the body. This will likely cost between $50-100, since it requires all keys to be removed, then later reassembled. Yes, you could chase it with Brasso if you want, but it won't get anything INSIDE the body tube or bow, where there probably is something.

Regarding another comment on this thread...although it may look cool...GREEN is bad news to leave on a horn...anywhere....
 

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I got a zephyr and an unlaquered Yamaha. On both I use a dremel on slow speed with a brass brush. It won't dig into the body since it's not any harder than the brass of the horn. It will only remove the green. On the zephyr I've covered the bare spots with lacquer finger nail polish. The brush is small enough for detail work. I must clarify that ove only used the polish on the back side of the horn where I grab it and at the thumb rest. I haven't had a need to remove green from the front of the horn.
 

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Sorry to hijack but I tried ketchup on the neck of my unlacquered Yani. It did an amazing job in a few minutes. Can I do the entire horn or will it mess up the pads and lubrication? is it ok to rinse the horn in water?
 

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To put a sax in water you would have to remove all the keys then dry it very well before you reassemble. I did it with an old Yanagisawa T 4. Not as difficult as you may think. I kind of like the idea of the horn being that clean once.
 

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Hell, I thought everybody was paying extra for a horn that looks like that nowadays.
 

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For small areas, I've simply used a damp cloth and the greenish corrosion wipes right off, no problem.
 

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verdigris can happen very quickly and be quite light when caused by just a tiny bit of moisture left on bare brass. However it can sooner or later eat into the metal if left there for long. So best to remove it as soon as it appears.

if it has been there long enough to corrode, then wire wool or wet and dry etc. will get it off, then finish off with a very fine grit or brasso.
 

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Hell, I thought everybody was paying extra for a horn that looks like that nowadays.
Too funny! Seriously though, if the horn hasn't been disassembled in a long time the chem bath is the way to go. That way the tech can clean and oil the rods and adjust the regulation at the same time.
 

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I went read more about verdigris and it is indeed nasty and destructive. I always thought oxidation needed oxygen, and as long as the brass was not exposed to air it would stop corroding. Apparently not with verdigris. Here's in one article: http://www.wire-sculpture.com/jewelry-making-blog/5388/prevent-remove-verdigris/

I played my vintage Mark VI tenor for about 10 years (bought it with 60% lacquer remaining about 15 years ago). Then I started playing more and more soprano, to the point that I ended up leaving the tenor in the case for close to a year without touching. When I re-opened it, it was full of oxidation, red spots, vedigris, you name it. That pushed me to a long due overhaul, including a chemical bath. Now it's all clean of oxidation again. Every time I play it, I now leave it drying for a couple hours before closing the case and storing it, whether coming back from a gig or just practicing at home. I hope that ugly stuff never comes back. Learned the hard way.
 

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Does barbeque sauce work as well?
Habenero based sauces will work better. Brass polish will still probably do a better job.
 
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