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Discussion Starter #1
I purchased a saxophone that someone sprayed a sparkle glitter lacquer over its existing lacquer. It almost comes off by scraping it with your nail. I'm planning on taking apart the saxophone and removing the glitter lacquer. What is the best way to remove it and possibly keep the lacquer finish underneath?
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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Try washing in bathtub hot water...good luck

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Depending on the type of the original lacquer, that could either work as desired or strip all the lacquer. It is irresponsible to give such advice without more information.
 

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TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
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Something you should try on a small area first to see if it affects the original lacquer (which in my experience it will not) is the spray can of 'Goof-Off', 'Oops' or 'Goo-Gone', all basically the same thing. Spray it on a soft cloth and lightly rub. I think you will get the added coat right off without harming the original.
 

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Though my kneejerk reaction would be "why"... just to be funny... I am curious as to what brand/model of horn this is. Certain lacquers for certain horns are more durable than others.

It is a 80-90s Selmer USA Tenor. It's a nice playing tenor, similar to my SBA, but the sparkle glitter has to go.
 

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Goo Gone works well to remove glues and adhesives. Goof Off is designed to remove dried latex paint but one must be careful of the fumes. I have not tried either one to remove spray paint. The Krylon company which sells much of the aerosol spray paint in the US recommends removing its paint with lacquer thinner, letting it soak a bit before wiping. A saxophone that age should not have the old nitrocellulose lacquer so hot water or lacquer thinner should not affect it. Be aware that if you use some type of abrasive pad with a solvent while trying to remove the paint it will probably leave scratches in the lacquer. If you end up having to remove both layers Aircraft Paint Remover that is brushed on works well. It must be done out doors and is a tedious and messy job.
 

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I suggest using the neck for experiments after removing the octave lever. The neck is relatively easy to relacquer/plate etc if something goes wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Goo Gone works well to remove glues and adhesives. Goof Off is designed to remove dried latex paint but one must be careful of the fumes. I have not tried either one to remove spray paint. The Krylon company which sells much of the aerosol spray paint in the US recommends removing its paint with lacquer thinner, letting it soak a bit before wiping. A saxophone that age should not have the old nitrocellulose lacquer so hot water or lacquer thinner should not affect it. Be aware that if you use some type of abrasive pad with a solvent while trying to remove the paint it will probably leave scratches in the lacquer. If you end up having to remove both layers Aircraft Paint Remover that is brushed on works well. It must be done out doors and is a tedious and messy job.
Thank you
 
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