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Hi all, I recently acquired a Jody Jazz Jet mouthpiece and have been playing it a lot, while i do wipe it down every time I finish playing I noticed today that there is like some white calcium deposit on the inside that is literally impossible for me to take off, I have tried many things. soaking it with water, dipping a q tip in water and scrubbing that part of the piece, gently trying to scrape it off with a toothpick. but it seems to be stuck on there. I know white vinegar works on my hard rubber pieces because I have left it soaking in there for around 10 minutes and it usually discolors it a little and gives off that burnt rubber scent. Should i just dip it in vinegar maybe or do you have any other suggestions of taking it off? I will provide a picture below. Thanks!

the picture: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1l2D4zi0J-VEYEYMk23kb3DrzEVuOd_PQ/view?usp=sharing
 

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I don't know what effect vinegar might have on your plating but I know that CLR won't harm it and is suitable for cleaning/de-liming metal and composite mouthpieces. CLR (calcium, lime, rust) is available at the grocery and home center. I use this as well as 'Lime-Away' for mouthpieces and for tarnish removal on metals including saxes. It also is harmless to plating and lacquer.
 

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Hi all, I recently acquired a Jody Jazz Jet mouthpiece and have been playing it a lot, while i do wipe it down every time I finish playing I noticed today that there is like some white calcium deposit on the inside that is literally impossible for me to take off, I have tried many things. soaking it with water, dipping a q tip in water and scrubbing that part of the piece, gently trying to scrape it off with a toothpick. but it seems to be stuck on there. I know white vinegar works on my hard rubber pieces because I have left it soaking in there for around 10 minutes and it usually discolors it a little and gives off that burnt rubber scent. Should i just dip it in vinegar maybe or do you have any other suggestions of taking it off? I will provide a picture below. Thanks!
Absolute best and safest method is a lukewarm solution of 3-5% citric acid, which is a common food additive and is available from a variety of sources including candy supply companies.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Absolute best and safest method is a lukewarm solution of 3-5% citric acid, which is a common food additive and is available from a variety of sources including candy supply companies.
Do you know if I can get this at a grocery store? And what brand do you usually use of it? Thanks for the suggestion.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I don't know what effect vinegar might have on your plating but I know that CLR won't harm it and is suitable for cleaning/de-liming metal and composite mouthpieces. CLR (calcium, lime, rust) is available at the grocery and home center. I use this as well as 'Lime-Away' for mouthpieces and for tarnish removal on metals including saxes. It also is harmless to plating and lacquer.
is this only for metal mouthpieces or does this apply to hard rubber and other materials, the Jet I have is not hard rubber or metal but another material. Thanks for the suggestion!
 

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You don't drink it, dude. You rinse it off. It is safe for cooking utensils, glassware, plastics, etc.
 

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White vinegar.
Soak a cotton ball with it and push it through a few times.
Repeat with a fresh soaked cotton ball if needed.
Or... dip a soft toothbrush in the vinegar and scrub inside.
Rinse in cool water after you've finished.
 

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How about an enzymatic denture cleaner like Polident? It would cut through any protein deposits which I suspect is the real problem more than calcium.
 

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You don't drink it, dude. You rinse it off. It is safe for cooking utensils, glassware, plastics, etc.
Yes absolutely fine to use.
I use it regularly on mouthpieces and to de scale my coffee machine.
All that’s required is a rinse afterwards.
I’ve never had much success with vinegar on mouthpieces.
For a quick general clean I use a denture cleaning tablet in a cup of water.
Warm to hot for metal pieces and cool for the others.
 

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well, vinegar is absolutely fine.

There are many threads prior than this where to get information

I get 305 hits by searching for cleaning mouthpiece vinegar

of course there is the great article witten by Stephen Howard.

http://www.shwoodwind.co.uk/Testing/Cleaning_mouthpieces.htm

I would certainly encourage any “ new” question for old and very well known problems to be addressed within old threads or to simply read the information offered there.
 

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Using white malt vinegar or white wine vinegar is brilliant! I probably wouldn’t soak it for a hell of a long time, but softening the deposits then gently removing them with an ear bud is the way. Hard rubber pieces are a lot easier to clean off deposits. I’ve been using vinegar for years and it’s always been great


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The Stephen Howard article ( link above, really worth reading) offers another and very good alternative to soaking and that is to fill the mouthpiece with absorbing material and pour the vinegar in it.

Leaving the absorbing material soaked with vinegar will descale the deposits but won’t do anything wrong to the outside of the mouthpiece.
 

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The Stephen Howard article ( link above, really worth reading) offers another and very good alternative to soaking and that is to fill the mouthpiece with absorbing material and pour the vinegar in it.

Leaving the absorbing material soaked with vinegar will descale the deposits but won’t do anything wrong to the outside of the mouthpiece.
Yes 100%! I completely forgot to mention I use cotton wool to fill the inside of the mouthpiece before soaking it as to not disturb the outside.


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Discussion Starter #16
White vinegar.
Soak a cotton ball with it and push it through a few times.
Repeat with a fresh soaked cotton ball if needed.
Or... dip a soft toothbrush in the vinegar and scrub inside.
Rinse in cool water after you've finished.
No luck with the toothbrush or cotton ball unfortunately, thanks for the suggestion though!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Using white malt vinegar or white wine vinegar is brilliant! I probably wouldn’t soak it for a hell of a long time, but softening the deposits then gently removing them with an ear bud is the way. Hard rubber pieces are a lot easier to clean off deposits. I’ve been using vinegar for years and it’s always been great


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Is usually around 5 minutes okay?
 

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You can soak the cottonwool or paper overnight if necessary. 5 minutes won’t do., maybe a couple of hours. Much depends on the strength of the vinegar.

Scales can be tough and set hard. Read Stephen Howard’s article.
 

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At least for metal mouthpieces I soak it in Coke for a couple hours and the deposits go away. Assume you can do the same for HR. Jam cotton balls soaked with Coke inside and it should clean it out. Not sure if the acid in Coke eats away at hard rubber though.
 
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