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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I ask this before I take off a double post on a Vito alto so that I can drill out a stuck screw and tap for a new screw. Have any tips that I'm not thinking about?
 

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I ask this before I take off a double post on a Vito alto so that I can drill out a stuck screw and tap for a new screw. Have any tips that I'm not thinking about?
Your question raises more questions. What do you mean by a "stuck screw". Typically threaded steel rods (hinge rods) are screwed into posts. As such, one of these breaking off flush with the face of the post so that it would have to be drilled out would be extremely rare.

If you are referring to a frozen steel pivot screw in which the screwdriver slot has been destroyed by an inadequate screwdriver, there may be other ways to back out the screw short of drilling it out. More details will help techs on this forum to better diagnose the best course of action.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sorry, yes it is a very stuck pivot screw. I have tried all my known methods and am left with the post removal idea. Having never done that before, it is possible that there is a tip that might help me.
 

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Assuming the screwdriver slot is gone, it is sometimes possible to re-cut the slot using a tiny diamond burr in a dremel tool. Heat, PB Blaster penetrating oil, tapping the post with a plastic or rawhide mallet are all methods I have used. Sometimes it is possible to file a bit of the "slope" off the point of the screw and get a good grip on it with small vice-grip pliers to get it started. Drilling into a hard steel screw surrounded by soft brass is a tricky business---even using a drill press with the post off the sax. If you end up having to take the post off the sax you might be better off dissolving the screw using alum. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I apologize for not being more clear in the original post. My question concerns removing a post, possibly buying a replacement post and re-attaching a post. I am asking for tips or helpful suggestions.
 

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If you insist on going that route. :doubt: Remove nearby keys with pads, wire down adjacent posts, guard feet, etc. so they don't come unsoldered as well. Use a torch with a small pointed flame such as a Blazer ES1000 and direct the tip of the flame at the base of the post. You may want to gently tap the top with the handle of a small screwdriver as you heat to knock it loose as soon as the solder melts.

After you have had your way with the post and want to resolder it, direct your pin point flame to the area on the sax body with the old solder after adding a bit of flux and wipe the solder away leaving just a "tinned" surface. Do the same to the foot of the post. Position the post you are resoldering on the body with the new pivot screw and key attached to get the perfect alignment. Wire the post in place with a bit of flux under the foot. (good luck, this is the tricky part) A tip I learned is to position a small piece of curved solder against the foot of the post and heat the opposite side until the solder flows under the post toward the flame.

Tix solder is an excellent choice since it melts at a lower temperature and is stronger than other soft solder. If you ruin the post, your chances of finding another one are nil unless the Vito is identical to a YAS-23, in which case you can probably order a new one. Good luck.
 

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I apologize for not being more clear in the original post. My question concerns removing a post, possibly buying a replacement post and re-attaching a post. I am asking for tips or helpful suggestions.
It may seem like it should be a simple DIY procedure, but unfortunately it is quite complicated. Replacement parts like this are sometimes impossible to find. Removing the post would be relatively easy, but re-attaching it properly isn't. Saxoclese's replies are on point.

As far as drilling and tapping for a new screw, what screw would you use? You'd either need to silver solder a brass insert into the drilled out post then drill & tap to match a Vito screw, or fit a different pivot screw and then fit the receiving end of the key to whatever pivot screw you've made work.

Have you tried taking it to a repair tech for help with it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you for the info. I have the proper drill bits, taps and replacement screws and machinery to do the job. I just lacked the info. Thanks again.
 

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I have tried all my known methods and am left with the post removal idea. Having never done that before, it is possible that there is a tip that might help me.
I don't know what methods you've tried. Have you tried reslotting the screw (I use a dental micromotor with a reverse taper bit), to get excellent grip with a screwdriver, in addition to letting penetrating oil wick and using heat (preferably a few cycles of heat and oil)? This method works for me at least 99% of the time (I've only had to resort to anything else maybe a few times in the last decade).

All the info about resoldering is good assuming it's a single post and not on a rib... which from vague memory it should be on a Vito (were there any Vitos with ribs?).
 

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I use a dental micromotor with a reverse taper bit)....
Likewise. And likewise, it is very, very rare for me to have to resort to othis. What is your experience in this sort of thing, and do you have the specialised screw drivers?

http://landainternational.com/busch burs; inverted cone; fig.3

MrYikes are you aware that these are available down to 0.6mm diameter. Good for re-slotting. They work better than diamond (unless you have a 500,000 rpm dental drill with sprayed water for flushing.)
Of course you need something like a dental micromotor for sufficient speed and control/precision.
 

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It's not necessary to remove a post in order to drill a screw out. I'd say removing the post is far easier than removing a stuck screw so if you can't figure out how to remove a post then dealing with the stuck screw is probably going to be beyond you.
 

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Removing the post has its risks. Here is an example of a screw someone tried to remove then brought to me. Both head and point we’re gone. I started the centerpoint for drilling with a diamond tip Dremel bit. The drillbit was close but did not damage the threads.


137AE845-FAB5-4F5D-B045-FEC5E801067F.jpg 12F8332A-8E29-4869-B030-C5FE9AAC0978.jpg 2BE32DF3-EECC-4384-B9B6-6D73376D796C.jpg 93C9E582-2700-4DAF-BE51-3D39AAD109D3.jpg 64C5D6F7-B6B7-42F4-91F3-EF9416CC0D67.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thank you all the the help. It really is appreciated. I did not have to remove the post. I had to also remove a broken portion of the neck screw, solder on a key guard foot and replace a few pads, corks and felts. Now I have to search and find an octave mechanism. I had not realized that part of it was missing.
 

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Excellent work. In some cases, access is the biggest obstacle to overcome.
Thank you, The next obstacle is trying to explain $60 a hour shop time. You have to approach something like this with extreme caution as you only get one try. I did it for free. Took about a hour. Techs like yourself can’t afford to give work like this away and the risk is often greater than the return. Things people don’t understand about the repair business.
 
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