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Remember those days? No SOTW, no internet.

All we had was our teachers and word of mouth. If you wanted a new mouthpiece you had to schlep it down to the local music store and try whatever they had in stock. No Googling what Dexter Gordon played on the album "Dexter Calling". No "Otto Link vs. Berg Larsen" thread to look up and see what everyone else thinks of the two.

You actually had to use your ears and the stuff between them to decide what was best for your playing.

I wonder if that's why all the greats in the past had their own sound that you could identify in two seconds, and why they each had their own vocabulary.

I'm not saying modern technology has made things better or worse. Just some thoughts rattling around my brain after a few homebrews.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Logician
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I'm not saying modern technology has made things better or worse. Just some thoughts rattling around my brain after a few homebrews.
No doubt for me that the internet has made things better. With what I do musically, I don't interact much with other saxophone players, and I've learned way more online about our craft in the last ten years than I learned in the ten years priorthereto. I also got to experiment with equipment that I never would have known about that is much better suited to what I used for previous decades. Information is good. Ready access to it is better. And being able to share ideas, concepts and styles of play with folks all over the globe? Simply priceless.
 

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I would have never had the pleasure of dealing with Aaron Drake, and falling in love with his fine mouthpieces had it not been for the web!
 

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Another thumbs up for the web: without it I'd still be playing inferior gear, rather than great stuff that has made me a much better player.
 

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In the end we still make our own decision. There is a lot more information out there now. For some it makes the journey longer, for some shorter. I think it is important to remember that everyone has an opinion and a voice but in the end you have to live life and make music in the way you see fit.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2007-
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That was the dark ages. That was the time when almost no body really understood much about saxophone and mouthpiece brands and models. And every shop told a different story. At least it was that way here. If Google was my generation's only gift to humanity, I would say it's enough.
 

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Forum Contributor 2016, Distinguished SOTW Member
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Remember those days? No SOTW, no internet.

All we had was our teachers and word of mouth. If you wanted a new mouthpiece you had to schlep it down to the local music store and try whatever they had in stock. No Googling what Dexter Gordon played on the album "Dexter Calling". No "Otto Link vs. Berg Larsen" thread to look up and see what everyone else thinks of the two.

You actually had to use your ears and the stuff between them to decide what was best for your playing.

I wonder if that's why all the greats in the past had their own sound that you could identify in two seconds, and why they each had their own vocabulary.

I'm not saying modern technology has made things better or worse. Just some thoughts rattling around my brain after a few homebrews.
Yeah, I remember that. It stunk. That's how I ended up playing a Caravan mouthpiece and trying to sound like Sanborn! What a waste! I also had a Brilhart Levelaire that was the lamest thing that I ever played on. I struggled with that mouthpiece for 3-4 years. I would take these days over those old days any day!
 

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Yeah I remember those days. But I don't necessarily agree with the implied nostalgia for making decisions for ourselves. At least that's the impression I get from the thread title.

Personally I've made a lot of uninformed decisions in my time - some good, some bad. But overall I prefer to get a lot of logical information before I go ahead and make an emotional decision based on prejudice and gut feeling. The web caters brilliantly for both needs!
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Bass Sax Boss
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I guess I'm the first one to disagree. I have never purchased a horn or mouthpiece because of information gleaned from the internet. I still do it the old way - I try them out live and side by side with my present setup, and if the new stuff doesn't make my own stuff play like a plugged nickel, I pass.
However, the internet has been a gold mine for finding performances by great players.
 

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Yes, back then, the only source of information was the library (or other musicians for music info) for those that chose to use it (or knew how). The internet has made information (good and bad) more available, but you still have to make your own decisions.
 

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I miss schlepping, although it has saved me a bit of cash over the years.
Once I touch a nice horn it's hard to "Just say NO" :)
 

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For years I had one horn, my Mark VI alto. Since the internet, I now have over 40 saxes. I need a twelve step program!!!
C, C#, D, Eb,......?
 

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The general consensus seems to be the students, aka members of the internet generation are sounding better than generations before them.

Although we have less opportunity to hone our chops on a real live bandstand, the availability of a seemingly infinite universe of killer info seems like a great thing for those who can glean what they can from tutorials, forums and killer YouTube videos - as long as we don't get diverted and find ourselves uploading pictures of what we had for dinner while our horns collect dust.

:)
 

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lots of folks idealise the past because they don't remember it well ....
 

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The internet makes it a lot easier to compare, research or look up any subject or object you are interested in. Lots of stores cater to online shopping also. Makes it a lot easier to purchase a mouthpiece, reeds, whatever. I don't miss the old days at all in this respect.
 

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I lived in NY, so it didn't matter. I could see and hear what guys were playing. Selmers were a lot cheaper without a bunch of internet horn flippers and you never saw any crappy saxophones from Taiwan. Yamahas were pretty much laughed at and the only thing that came from China was the food.
We all passed around mouthpieces like old girlfriends. Nobody really thought they would try to make a living off of selling **** to jazz musicians. Guardalas were probably the only $400 mouthpiece around and 90 percent of what are now called "Early Babbitt" Links sucked then too.
 

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If the Internet and SOTW available when I was a teenager, I probably would have found the info on long tone exercises, overtones, and opening my throat more, and become a better sounding player.

I probably still would have bought a Mark VI alto when it came time to buy my pro horn in 1975 - although it is possible I might have bought a used one if SOTW was around back then (you could still buy new Mark VI horns in 1975). I can tell you that already at that time there was the legend that older Mark VI horns were better, although no one could say why. When one of us said "The ones that say 'Elkhart' on them are better", the only response from the other teenagers was silence and nodding.
 

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Well, I live in Singapore. Have to get just about everything ordered in. Stores here have next to nothing, so SOTW is extremely good for me. That's just me though.
 

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Still do but then again I come from a pre-historic time of dial phones and cars without seat belts.

I cringe every time I see somebody ask advice about their future on here. What about asking your parents or a best friend for advice?

All that said, I think for people outside large metropolitan areas like NYC where I grew up their is no other option if you want to peruse what the world offers for musicians. I now live in Oklahoma City which is NOT a mecca for saxophonists.

Before the internet I played a crappy Brilhart Levelair on a Buffet S-1 alto and didn't know any better.:banghead:

The old adage applies "if I only knew then what I know now."

B
 
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