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I picked up a sax at a garage sale today. I dont play, but for some reason I had to have it. It has been completely disassembled for repadding, etc. Anyhow I did some research online and it turns out to be a 1925-26 Chu Berry. In the case there was a card for a local guy who repairs saxophones so i called him, explained what i had and its condition and asked him how much it would be to get it back in working condition. he said about $450 and that that was a good price. I know nothing about these horns, but this particular model seems to be well respected. Is it worth putting it back together for that price? Is that a fair price? If I decided to sell it later would I at least get my money back?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 

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I am assuming it is an alto. These are great horns and worth having put in working order. If it is a tenor, there are less of them. Silver? gold plate? Lacquer? A photo would help.
 

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I am assuming it is an alto. These are great horns and worth having put in working order. If it is a tenor, there are less of them.
Ie, they're more worth putting in order. And they're really great horns.

Silver? gold plate? Lacquer? A photo would help.
This.
 

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Is it worth putting it back together for that price?
Not if there's a letter H under the serial number (hopefully, it's a letter L). Tell us the number above the serial number as well to sort out whether or not it's an alto, tenor, soprano... or what have you. Also letting us know the serial number itself would confirm the year of manufacture.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I will take some photos when I get home. Im also considering repadding/reassembling it myself. Is there any kind of guide/diagram that can show me what order and where things go? Im assuming that the pads arent that expensive?
 

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Pads run about $50 but installing them is another $400 or so. It takes years to learn how to do this. If it is gold plated, it certainly would be worth a pro redo. Most are gold lacquered which was done years after they were made. The photos will tell the tale.
 

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You might want to make sure it is not a C-melody before you invest the $ 450.00 in it.

If there is a C above the serial number, it is the C melody. You can buy one in playing condition for $ 400-500.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Hey,
sorry this has been slow going, Im having problems getting the page here to load at home, so I only have a brief period at work where I can log in. It IS an alto. I have 2 roads I can take here. I can pay $450 to rebuild it and then sell it for a small profit (because I cant really afford to invest that much money in it and just hang on to it) OR, I can put it back together so that it looks right, and keep it a display piece/ piece of art. Perfect functionality wouldnt really be important. Either way, its gonna be better than it sitting in pieces in a musty garage under a pile of newspapers. and I really would like to keep it. So, how difficult is it to re-assemble? As I asked before are there diagrams or any walk through processes online to aid me? I imagine Id need the same type thing when I do the pads? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Very straight forward for putting it together but if you haven't done pads, just try to do the ones that really need relplacing. When you take it apart, you are going to knock corks and felts off and mess up the adjustment so tread lightly! BTW, I got a Chu silver alto today with a lot of dents and dings and I paid over $400 so even a cheapskate like me will keep buying these!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
As I said before, it was already completely disassembled when I purchased it. All, pad, felt, cork have been removed. So that part is already done. Do the pads come in kits? Is there a particular brand/make I should buy?
 

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If getting photos of this is going to take some time, you can help us help you by looking at the letters above and below the serial number. Above it, an "A" = Alto, "T" = Bd Tenor, "C"= C-Melody. The letters below will either be an "L" for Low Pitch (i.e. A=440) which is what you want, or an "H"= High Pitch, which is obsolete and definitely NOT what you want.

Until/unless good photos are provided, determining it's monetary value, and thus how much you can and should spend refurbishing it before you are upside down with the horn, will not be possible.
 

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It doesn't look gold plated to me. It looks like bare brass with some kind of lacquer over it. And the second picture I noticed what looked like a resolder
 

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^+1, Definitely not a gold plated Chu.

But I think what looks to be solder work is actually just dried up polish of some kind or another.

Just as a point of reference, here's a shot of my gold plated Chu: (note that it's a satin finish...a burnished finish was also available but is far less common and featured more elaborate engraving)

 

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Discussion Starter #20
Yeah, its polish. Having looked it over theres doesnt appear to be any resoldering. So where do i begin putting this guy back together?
 
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