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Discussion Starter #1
The oddity is that before I had my Link refaced, my 404 Lig would seal the reed to the table so that moisture from the playing the piece wouldn't run down the butt of the reed. Leaving the brand name non-faded or wet. However, after the reface (flattening the table and fixing the curve) the ligature doesn't seal like it used to. Now, moisture somehow makes it back to the butt of the reed.
I was just wondering if this has happened to anyone else?
 

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When I had a Lawton piece refaced, the ligature stopped holding the reed so securely on the table. If you know the Lawton design of lig it, fits in machined grooves that are parallel to the table and then the ligature plate adjusts down with a single screw towards the reed.

What happened in my case is that the mouthpiece table was skimmed, so the ligature grooves effectively became closer to the table and the reed was slightly further away from the ligature plate. The ligature thumbscrew had been close to the limit of its travel to clamp down a reed, but after refacing it was just a fraction further away and wouldn't quite reach the thinest reeds.

That may or may not be what is happening on your Link. Try putting some padding material on the reed where your ligature holds it. I use a mouthpiece bite patch on my Lawton and that does the trick.

Rhys
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I will try that once I get my tenor back from the shop. I'm welcome to any suggestions that can help seal it back up. Do you put the material on the reed itself or do put it on the lig, where the reed contacts the lig?
 

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In my case I stuck it to the plate of the ligature using the self-adhesive properties of the mouthpiece patch. But for a ligature without a pressure plate I suppose you would stick it to the reed. Alternatively you could stick it to the top of the mouthpiece - just anything to add a little to the effective diameter that the lig grips on so that it grips firmly enough on the reed.

Rhys
 

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Your mouthpiece was originally made with an intentional concavity so that the reed made contact with the table in a different way. If you had the table 'flattened' then the concavity was removed and your reeds are conforming to the table totally differently than they were. Make sure of course to use new reeds because your old ones are used to a differently shaped table and curve.
 

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Your mouthpiece was originally made with an intentional concavity so that the reed made contact with the table in a different way. If you had the table 'flattened' then the concavity was removed and your reeds are conforming to the table totally differently than they were. Make sure of course to use new reeds because your old ones are used to a differently shaped table and curve.
I agree with this, try new reeds. OTOH, if you are having this problem with new reeds, it sounds like the table isn't flat, it's convexed. The merits of a concaved vs. flat table can be debated, but one of the best things about a concaved table IMO is that it's certain not to be convexed, which is a too-common characteristic of tables lapped "flat" by hand.
 

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I agree. Check your table flatness with a straight edge. If it is indeed flat and not convex, check the flatness of your wet cane reeds. Scrape or sand them flat if needed.
 

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If the table is flat and the mouthpiece is correct...

The problem may be with your ligature. Check to see whether the two sides of the lig are touching. If they are, you may be at the limit of the ligature regarding holding the reed sufficiently tight (and I am NOT an advocate of clamping the reed overtight).

The solution is to remove the ligature screws and lightly file material from each side until you can sufficiently tighten the ligature to hold the reed.
 

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I recently got a refaced Link that has a definitely flat table. It plays incredibly well (a function of more than just table for sure, but it's clearly a factor in a properly performing mpc).
My reeds are all discolored in the ligature plate area. The table is discolored there as well from moisture.
You do not present this as a problem, but as "just odd".
I would not even use the term odd; what's important is the response and sound.
I think moisture between the reed and table is often overlooked as (my opinion) a positive thing, regardless of the whole flat vs. concave, reed "warpage" debates, etc. To my mind, the reed is wood, and as such is somewhat porous, and will never be perfectly "flat". Thus regardless of mpc table features, moisture and its surface tension can enable an airtight seal.
Also, the dripping from the butt end, may not in fact be passing between the reed and mpc, but running along the sides of the reed.
During the best practice sessions (great sound, reed responding incredibly well throughout range of horn) I have had recently, I've noticed that I was salivating a lot for whatever reason. On one of these occasions I was outdoors in 90+ degree F weather with 90+% relative humidity. The other was in a basement, where I had saliva dripping off the reed. I am sure it was coming from the sides of my mouth where the side edges of the reed are. So I am finding moisture and humidity to be beneficial in several ways. A bit messy, but beneficial.
 

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Okay,

The reed is going to wick moisture. So after a while, all surfaces not covered in bark will likely be moist. What's new about that?

Next, once refaced, the table on the mouthpiece will have lost it's original plating finish. So the bare brass, copper or bronze is now going to corrode. This will cause some discoloration on the bottom of the reed. My experience is that this almost always happens. Again, nothing new. And all the mouthpieces I use are refaced.

Third. The the Selmer lig usually has to be stretched somewhat to fit many of the Link STM pieces. So it's going to be very form-fitting once stretched. After refacing, the table will be a little lower than before. The lig will no longer be form-fitting and may be a little too big.. I imagine a new Selmer lig would work just fine once stretched to fit the refaced Link.
 

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The OP is already using a 404 - and it doesn't work post-refacing.
 

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The OP is already using a 404 - and it doesn't work post-refacing.
Yep,

But it was probably stretched out before the refacing. That's my third point. :tsk:
 

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