Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Forum Contributor 2016, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
12,793 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone salvage reeds that won't seal on a mouthpiece? What is your technique? Is it just a matter of running the flat part over sandpaper on a flat surface? I ask because I have a shoebox with well over a thousand reeds that wouldn't seal . This usually happens because I am using it on a mouthpiece that I am reviewing and then try to use it on a mouthpiece with a different facing curve. Are there any hope for these? thanks, Steve
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
12,710 Posts
Steve, I would try the light sand paper routine.

Then perhaps take a batch and soak them for a good bit. Let them dry on a sheet of glass or a lavoz reed holder. Something to let them regain their shape.

If you played them a lot they will probably retain their memory of a different curve. However, you may save a percentage. Also be a little patient when trying them again. I would not use them for another review but for your own practice instead. With a little patience and re-break in playing it may learn the new curve and be decent.

Then again maybe not...but its worth trying.
 

·
Forum Contributor 2016, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
12,793 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Steve, I would try the light sand paper routine.

Then perhaps take a batch and soak them for a good bit. Let them dry on a sheet of glass or a lavoz reed holder. Something to let them regain their shape.

If you played them a lot they will probably retain their memory of a different curve. However, you may save a percentage. Also be a little patient when trying them again. I would not use them for another review but for your own practice instead. With a little patience and re-break in playing it may learn the new curve and be decent.

Then again maybe not...but its worth trying.
Thanks. I ask because i have been playing on a metal piece and it stopped sealing on that piece after a few days for whatever reason. I then tried it on a new HR piece I just got and it played great and sealed and then 10 minutes later it started not playing great and of course it is not sealing again. I was about to chuck it in my shoebox but then thought maybe I can resurrect some of these.........
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
12,710 Posts
maybe since you play so many pieces get smaller shoe boxes.

You dont know the facing length but you know the tip size

In the future separate the big tips from the moderate ones. Also you can bet that high baffle pieces are long facings so put those separate from others.

I think this will increase your chances of finding use for them.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/ Forum Contributor 2011
Joined
·
2,574 Posts
Although I have pretty much gone the Legere Signature route, immediately before that, I was having great success with the Reed Geek (though a decent razor blade or reed knife could certainly work as well) on the portion of the reed that makes contact with the table.

For me, when a reed stopped sealing it was almost invariably a convex area in the center of the reed table starting just beyond the area where the mouthpiece window ended. Flattening that area (sometimes every few practices) fixed a great many reeds. To flatten, I ran the blade, scraping with the blade fully across the reed's underside, from the area where the window ends to the butt. In my situation, it was very obvious that material was being removed from the center of the reed, both by accumulated "sawdust" and by the shiny area on the reed table where the scrape had removed the material.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,870 Posts
Although I have pretty much gone the Legere Signature route, immediately before that, I was having great success with the Reed Geek (though a decent razor blade or reed knife could certainly work as well) on the portion of the reed that makes contact with the table.

For me, when a reed stopped sealing it was almost invariably a convex area in the center of the reed table starting just beyond the area where the mouthpiece window ended. Flattening that area (sometimes every few practices) fixed a great many reeds. To flatten, I ran the blade, scraping with the blade fully across the reed's underside, from the area where the window ends to the butt. In my situation, it was very obvious that material was being removed from the center of the reed, both by accumulated "sawdust" and by the shiny area on the reed table where the scrape had removed the material.
I've had the same experience with my reed geek. After you play a reed for about 20 minutes, the center of the flat side begins bulge. The geek flattens it all. You can even tell it's flatter because reed the doesn't slide around on the table when you put it on the mpc. Also, if you take the newly flattened reed off after playing it, there is no moisture under the reed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
840 Posts
I use the reed geek for a few passes lightly on the back of the reed as I sometimes have issues with reeds that initially play great and then after 10-15 minutes of playing them, they go south on me. Works really well for me. I only use it on the back of the reed and not on any other areas. Perfect seal after I am finished. I know some say the suction test or sealing test does not matter or make a difference. My old clarinet teacher who also was an excellent mouthpiece refacer could not stress enough the importance of a reed that seals perfectly. This advice has stayed with me throughout the years and I am a firm believer in it
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
566 Posts
Thanks. I ask because i have been playing on a metal piece and it stopped sealing on that piece after a few days for whatever reason. I then tried it on a new HR piece I just got and it played great and sealed and then 10 minutes later it started not playing great and of course it is not sealing again. I was about to chuck it in my shoebox but then thought maybe I can resurrect some of these.........
don't use a shoe box,use a rubbish bin.
problem solved.
now if you had very little money,then its time to work the reed which you probably know about.
goodluck.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,248 Posts
you soak them for a few hours or more then put them in plastic reed guards like vandoren or daddario stock clear plastic ones, put them in a ziploc bag and let them
Dry very slowly over course of a day or two. After first 24 hours you ca. Slightly open bag to allow some more air in and prevent mold. After a couple days the reeds should
Be returned to a flat state.

I’ve had immediate success with scraping with a knife the back middle portion like others have mentioned BUT your taking material
Off the reed and thus it’s a thinner reed. There is a trade-off.

Once it dries then you will be dealing with same issue all over again.

If you can prevent them from ever drying past 60-70% humidity they will not warp and be
Be more stable too.

Ahhh reeds!! :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
976 Posts
I find most reed bottoms are like ice skating blades, high on the outside edges. 600 grit on a glass piece over a couple days usually does it. don't fix it all at once. I never try the sealing test , so,,,,,,
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
Joined
·
7,420 Posts
I don't either - I've seen guys take the mouthpiece off and suck the air out so the reed stuck shut - my reaction was 'So, what happens now?'. I don't waste time messing with reeds - I tried it a few times over the years but always go back to buying by the box and using most of them. I like the 'core' of a new, unmodified reed and I like how the reeds change over time in rotation.
One thing about this thread is it illustrates two concepts; one is to leave the reed on the mouthpiece because you believe there is some benefit to it taking a set curve.
The other concept is to keep the reed straight, like a new reed, so it plays more like new every time. I do this by using Reed Guards - take the reed off after playing and put it in the RG wet. Next time you want to play that reed, take it out, wet it and put it back in for at least 30 minutes but up to several hours depending on humidity. The reed is straight and flat and plays like new. Besides, you must take reeds off a metal mouthpiece if you care about the mouthpiece.
A part of this regimen is regular cleaning of the reeds. Typically I'll do this before going to a practice or a gig; Take the reeds out of the RG, put them in a flat-bottomed plate/saucer and pour on some Hydrogen Peroxide. Wash the reeds in it scrubbing with a toothbrush, both sides. Shake off excess liquid and put them back in the RG. They'll be ready to play when you are ready for them.
This is how you keep reeds like new longer but I guess it doesn't work for the guys who want to use a harder reed that plays softer because it is allowed to stay bent, reducing the effective tip opening by 50% or more. Presumably this is done to promote 'reed sealing'. Hmmm...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,814 Posts
If the reed stops sealing after 10 or 15 minutes, it's warping due to absorbing moisture. Matt Stohrer did a video showing this, and showing the solution - scrape the back of the reed, and it will seal again.

FWIW he used a 3-sided scraper (Music Medic sells these for less than $15). They are a lot easier to use than a Reed Geek, but you can't take them on a plane :)
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top