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Should I stick with 2-21/2 Vandoren Javas for my metal Ottolink or go up to 3-31/2 and play the same size on Tenor as I play on my Alto?

I've heard you should stick with low numbers on metal mouthpieces.

any opinions, questions?
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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Should I stick with 2-21/2 Vandoren Javas for my metal Ottolink or go up to 3-31/2 and play the same size on Tenor as I play on my Alto?

I've heard you should stick with low numbers on metal mouthpieces.

any opinions, questions?
I find that for me, same size as tenor works for alto.

I have no idea what you mean by low numbers for metal mouthpieces, that makes no sense at all.

Ideally play as soft a reed as you can, that is my advice. That way you get the most versatility. Hard reeds are OK if you can't get those advantages any other way, but I would advise working on breath support and diaphragm instead of hard reeds.
 

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I've heard you should stick with low numbers on metal mouthpieces.

any opinions, questions?
That's nonsense. I play the same reed strength on metal and hard rubber, as long as the tip opening is identical or similar.
Regardless of alto or tenor, the goal is to find a reed that will allow you to play comfortably and clearly in all registers of the horn. Hard reeds may seem to give you a better high register, but your tone may sound constrained and the low register will become much harder to control.
 

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The only thing I would add to this is use Rico reeds not Vandorens. Maybe LaVoz...

I find that Vandorens are stuffy and dull compared to Ricos on this kind of piece.
 

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Should I stick with 2-21/2 Vandoren Javas for my metal Ottolink or go up to 3-31/2 and play the same size on Tenor as I play on my Alto?

I've heard you should stick with low numbers on metal mouthpieces.

any opinions, questions?
I find that for me, same size as tenor works for alto.

I have no idea what you mean by low numbers for metal mouthpieces, that makes no sense at all.

Ideally play as soft a reed as you can, that is my advice. That way you get the most versatility. Hard reeds are OK if you can't get those advantages any other way, but I would advise working on breath support and diaphragm instead of hard reeds.

Yep. I've found this to be true after much experimentation myself.
 

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...ideally play as hard a reed as possible on a tip opening that is comfortable for you. That way you get a much broader and richer tonal palette while developing strong, flexible and controlled embouchure and air support.
 

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...ideally play as hard a reed as possible on a tip opening that is comfortable for you. That way you get a much broader and richer tonal palette while developing strong, flexible and controlled embouchure and air support.
Agreed. This is the strategy my teacher recommends as well (who also plays a Link). Soft reeds can be wonderfully easy to play but if your chops are up to playing a harder reed, you'll soon discover new potential in your sound. And if you practice enough on the harder reed, it will be just as responsive as the softer reed you had before but will sound better.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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...ideally play as hard a reed as possible on a tip opening that is comfortable for you. That way you get a much broader and richer tonal palette while developing strong, flexible and controlled embouchure and air support.
Agreed. This is the strategy my teacher recommends as well (who also plays a Link). Soft reeds can be wonderfully easy to play but if your chops are up to playing a harder reed, you'll soon discover new potential in your sound. And if you practice enough on the harder reed, it will be just as responsive as the softer reed you had before but will sound better.
I don't get the bit about "if your chops are up to playing a harder reed,". I found that harder reeds are easier to play, but not easier to play with a good and versatile tone. To play softer reeds you need to really develop your chops, ie embouchure and breath support. It's hard to play soft reeds and get really loud, but it is possible if you work at it, and when you finally get the ability, then you have the added value of all the advantages that you get from softer reeds.

I think the whole hard reed thing is often down to machismo, let's forget that and just go for the sound and feel.
 

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I like medium reeds. You get the best of both worlds. The power of the hard reed, the versatility and ease of use of a softer one (without buzziness or blocking of the opening).
 

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I like medium reeds. You get the best of both worlds. The power of the hard reed, the versatility and ease of use of a softer one (without buzziness or blocking of the opening).
What you need is the right strength of reed for the combination of you, mouthpiece, style of music and the amount of versatility you require.
 

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Should I stick with 2-21/2 Vandoren Javas for my metal Ottolink or go up to 3-31/2 and play the same size on Tenor as I play on my Alto?

I've heard you should stick with low numbers on metal mouthpieces.

any opinions, questions?
As long as you are getting the sound!! you want, that really is all that matters, if you already sound good why change reed strengths?..also your mouthpiece factors,tip opening etc! would be a factor in determining which reed to use.
 

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I've heard you should stick with low numbers on metal mouthpieces.

any opinions, questions?
That's nonsense. I play the same reed strength on metal and hard rubber, as long as the tip opening is identical or similar.
Regardless of alto or tenor, the goal is to find a reed that will allow you to play comfortably and clearly in all registers of the horn. Hard reeds may seem to give you a better high register, but your tone may sound constrained and the low register will become much harder to control.
I think the same that Jlima. An intermediate reed is ideal to play well in all registers.
 
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