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looks like a great ,easy to use and inexpensive product..

anyone got any criticisms of it????
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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A very good friend of mine designed and makes this great tool. It levels the reed and can also be used to adjust almost every aspect of a reed. It's the best reed tool I've ever owned and its starting to get a lot of positive attention from many pros. I distribute them in NYC and have many friends who love them. It also doesn't get confiscated by the TSA when I'm traveling (unlike reed knives). They're a great investment to make every reed play better!
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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Why not just use a Stanley blade?
Having seen a reedgeek in action at Namm, I am happy to eat my hat in regard to the above statement. I am now the proud owner of a reedgeek.

The way it flattens the back makes the reed much smoother, better seal and easier to determine the right amount to take off.

So I am now officially a reedgeek convert.
 

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An amazing tool. I just got one and turned a ton of duds into awesome players. Mine more than paid for itself in a weekend. Most of the time simply ensuring the table of the reed is flat does wonders. Tiny adjustments are very easy and accurate. Highly recommended!
 

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I purchased one at the NAMM show a week or so ago. And I was really impressed with it's ease of use. I've had a reed knife for years but hardly used it as I couldn't take it with me on the road and I had a hard time getting any good results from it's use. The "geek" is the perfect size and I was impressed with not only how quickly and well it improves the table of the reed, but also how the end scraper blade can make small, fast and effective adjustments of the core of the reed. I've never been a reed working guy. If a reed didn't play, I'd toss it. Luckily I've saved a lot of the many rejects I found over the years. After trying it on 20 or so reeds that I had in the reject box, last week. I was able to make all but two work well enough to practice on and many that I'd use on a gig. I thought it would be a lot harder to get the hang of using it since I rarely worked on reeds before, but it was a short learning curve. If you factor in the cost of the average number of bum reeds in a box, it will pay for itself quickly.


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