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Discussion Starter #1
I noticed in a box of Alexander Superial alto reeds 4 out of 5 reed tip corners looked pretty fragile and brighter colour, almost like it's warped or dying, after a few times of playing just for few minutes in the breakin period. I keep them soaked in a sealed container with water alcohol mixture, so normally I don't see the usual moisture variation warping at all. I knew generally Superial tips are very fragile so I managed to return the reeds as defected because they were also chirping too.

I got a box of Rigotti Gold reeds and after a few times of playing in the breakin period I noticed the same situation for some of those reeds. Is it just the thin tip issue (Rigotti Gold Jazz 3M) or is there any systemic behaviour that you have seen before?

Could it be the mouthpiece? It is an alto Meyer between 5 and 6 tip opening (refaced). The affected corner area is as narrow as the side rail thickness so I'm wondering the high frequency of vibration and reed hitting the side rails cause this. But any mouthpiece rail has the same situation anyway so I don't know what could be different. Could it be the reed cases? I kept the Alexander reeds in the Vandoren individual plastic reed cases (pretty loose and non-invasive) and for Rigotti reeds inside the individual plastic reed cases that the Rigotti reeds come with. Those Rigotti reed cases seem to be pretty tight compared to other ones so I'm thinking that could be an issue. Anyone else has the same tendency with Rigotti reeds or any other reeds?

Could it be the alcohol water mixture? It is 30% almost pure ethanol alcohol and 70% water.

BTW, I don't put the cap on while the reed is on the mouthpiece. If I'm done playing for a while, I put the reed back in the case in the liquid to avoid moisture variation since Calgary is very dry.

I appreciate your comments.
 

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I, too, live in a dry climate (7000', high desert). I avoid warping by letting my reeds dry in a LaVoz reed case between uses.

FWIW, I use Rigotti and Alexander DC reeds.

 

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Discussion Starter #3
I, too, live in a dry climate (7000', high desert). I avoid warping by letting my reeds dry in a LaVoz reed case between uses.

FWIW, I use Rigotti and Alexander DC reeds.

Thanks for the tip. I'll resort back to this style of reed holder see if I can sort this out.
 

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+1 to what Dr G said.

I once tried the method of keeping the reeds soaked or moist and while they didn't warp, they ended up playing like a wet noodle.

Instead of keeping the reeds soaking, you might try simply rinsing the reed off after use, wiping off excess water, then placing it in a reed case like Dr G showed. Before playing, a 2 minute soak in water will get the reed ready to go.

I've been using the the D'addario cases, very similar to La Voz case. They allow the reeds to dry and also can be dissembled and cleaned:

https://www.amazon.com/DAddario-Woo...srs=12220024011&ie=UTF8&qid=1516823702&sr=8-8
 

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Discussion Starter #5
+1 to what Dr G said.

I once tried the method of keeping the reeds soaked or moist and while they didn't warp, they ended up playing like a wet noodle.

Instead of keeping the reeds soaking, you might try simply rinsing the reed off after use, wiping off excess water, then placing it in a reed case like Dr G showed. Before playing, a 2 minute soak in water will get the reed ready to go.

I've been using the the D'addario cases, very similar to La Voz case. They allow the reeds to dry and also can be dissembled and cleaned:

https://www.amazon.com/DAddario-Woo...srs=12220024011&ie=UTF8&qid=1516823702&sr=8-8
Thanks for the info.
 

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+1 to what Dr G said.

I once tried the method of keeping the reeds soaked or moist and while they didn't warp, they ended up playing like a wet noodle.

Instead of keeping the reeds soaking, you might try simply rinsing the reed off after use, wiping off excess water, then placing it in a reed case like Dr G showed. Before playing, a 2 minute soak in water will get the reed ready to go.

I've been using the the D'addario cases, very similar to La Voz case. They allow the reeds to dry and also can be dissembled and cleaned:

https://www.amazon.com/DAddario-Woo...srs=12220024011&ie=UTF8&qid=1516823702&sr=8-8
Agree with JL. I have tried all things regarding storage, including vodka, listerine etc. I always come back to 2-3 minutes in water before playing. After playing, lukewarm tap water and a gently rinsing with a soft toothbrush. Then either storage in a LaVoz holder in open air or just on a flat surface like a little glass plate... Gives me most mileage and most consistent reeds.
 

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Visibly defective Alexander reeds are nothing new. If they were playable, I wouldn't mind. But after some initial success with them some years ago, and then five tins of overpriced unplayable reeds after that, I never went back.
 

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Visibly defective Alexander reeds are nothing new. If they were playable, I wouldn't mind. But after some initial success with them some years ago, and then five tins of overpriced unplayable reeds after that, I never went back.
My experience was the same though I stopped at 3 tins purchased a year or two apart several years back. Mine played great during an quick initial 10-20 minute break-in and after that became unplayable in short order.
 

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I used to keep a bottle of reed soup going until I lived in a really low humidity area. It seemed like by the time I'd be done with a short session my reed would be a trainwreck. Practice, gig, lesson, all the same. Went to just water and it helped a little, but going back to more traditional reed storage solved the problem. Now I just use the provided holders. Side note: the first reed you pick in your first tin of Alexanders might be the best reed you've ever played. The rest, and every other tin will suck.
 

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My experience was the same though I stopped at 3 tins purchased a year or two apart several years back.
I'd have stopped at three as well, but bought five at once thinking I had finally found something to replace my beloved Rico Royals once my stash of old stock ran out.
 
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