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Just a guy who plays saxophone.
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4,468 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just a little quandry. My sound doesn't seem to be bothered, but you know how it is. I played a Link STM for my first six months, but don't remember if this was the case or not.

So, A little background: For the last six years I have played nothing but non-metal tenor mouthpieces. I have tried out the occasional metal link or whatever, but never played anything more than a few minutes. The other day I got a metal mouthpiece from a forum member, and I am liking it. A funny thing happens when I play it though:

When I remove the ligature to change reeds the end with the "bark" on it is bone dry. The vibrating/ cut end is wet like normal, just the butt of the reed is dry.

Is this just a metal mouthpiece thing?

Is it because the table is perfectly flat (yes, I had it checked)?

I have noticed when taking a look at the other mouthpieces I own (all non-metal), that the tables on all of them are ever-so slightly concave, and when I am done playing the whole reed is thoroughly soaked.

Perhaps this concavity is to accomodate some level of swelling of the reed?

I think that compared to most people I know, I stay well hydrated, and if the condensation in the neck is any measure: I have no shortage of hot air. :mrgreen:

Yes, I did a google search and I scanned the first 15-18 pages of the reeds sub-forum, so please don't make the usual "use the search function" comments...Steve

Oh, I do place my reeds in a flat holder to dry out while not playing...Mold is gross, and I haven't found any method that works better for me yet.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
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2,323 Posts
Perhaps the Lig you are using on the metal piece is giving you a tighter seal which results is less moisture traveling down there?
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member
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Situation normal. Your rubber pieces may have slightly warped tables, although there is a school of thought on 'dishing' the table. Either way, you have been losing air between the reed and mouthpiece which is how the moisture got there. Sounds like your metal piece is sealed up and working right. What is it, BTW? And, did Jon Van Wie ever work on your rubber pieces? He was a proponent of the dished table.
 

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Just a guy who plays saxophone.
Joined
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4,468 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Situation normal. Your rubber pieces may have slightly warped tables, although there is a school of thought on 'dishing' the table. Either way, you have been losing air between the reed and mouthpiece which is how the moisture got there. Sounds like your metal piece is sealed up and working right. What is it, BTW? And, did Jon Van Wie ever work on your rubber pieces? He was a proponent of the dished table.
The metal piece is a Barone Hollywood. The non-metal pieces are 3 Saxscape prototypes (really like them) with original facings, and two stock Cannonballs. Not so sure about the CBs, but the Saxscapes are identical in their 'dishing'. Probably done intentionally.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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Indistinguishable Resident Buescher Bigot and Foru
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8,588 Posts
Lamberson, too...
Just a guess (and a question), but the thought there was to allow for expansion of the center of the reed table rather than cut the reed flat after it warped?
 
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