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Are you looking for a thin reed knife like that? Are you doing mostly cutting of cane or scraping. It might be better to look for a scraping style knife if you are adjusting and not making reeds. I personally like http://www.wwbw.com/Vitri-Reed-Knife-471852-i1423080.wwbw for all around work. It can cut or scrape, but I really like the solid handle. I had a teacher who made all of his own single reeds that was giving a clinic and sliced deeply into his leg. I want all of the stability I can get.

If I were only scraping and adjusting I would look for a beveled blade like this one: http://www.wwbw.com/Rigotti-Reed-Knives-471853-i1423081.wwbw

Of the two you listed, the Pisoni says that the handle holds the blade open securely. The Fox doesn't say. I would be worried about that.
-anchorsax
 

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Any "better quality" pocket knife (Spyderco, Howard, Kershaw, Case $25. and up range) will usually have a double hollow ground blade(s) find one with the additional sheepsfoot blade (very common) and there you have a reed knife.
 

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Now this is a reed knife!

Rectangle Sleeve Beige Font Metal

I just spotted this at AGRussell.com.

And another..

Rectangle Wood Tool Font Knife
 

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Hmmm, I like this one (still less than $50)!

Automotive lighting Gesture Rectangle Wood Automotive exterior
 

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Though the copy accompanying these products don't specify it, reed knives are for scraping oboe reeds and and other reeds for other double reed instruments. They are ridiculously expensive. If you must have a reed knife look for a used one on ebay.

It seems that times have changed tremendously since I was a student musician. Younger musicians are willing to pay exorbitant prices for tools and gear that they probably don't need.

What worked for me for years when I was primarily a saxophonist was a technique taught by Alvin Battiste (Southern University, New Orleans Center for the Creative Arts, and University of New Orleans). It required a flat sheet of glass, a razor blade, a sheet of 0000 fine sand paper, and a reed clip. Using the razor blade, scrape the heart if you think that it needs to be adjusted, Pass the reed on the sandpaper that is placed on the flat piece of glass and pass the flat side of the reed across the sand paper a few times to flatten any warp, then adjust the tip by flipping it over and thinning the leading edge on the sandpaper (if it is needed), then finally clip the reed to adjust the reed's stiffness.

You can extend the life of a reed by making simple adjustments with simple and in expensive tools. The reed knives that I have seen look like knives for scraping reeds for making double reed instruments. If you really need an expensive knife, check out the Rigotti line. It'll put a serious dent in your pocket.

But you probably don't need a Rigotti.
 

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Yes, the OP has surely decided what to do; but the thread is still relevant.

Those straight-razor-looking knives are for double reed making. For single reed adjustment, what I've successfully used for the last 35 years or so is a plain small penknife. The curved cutting edge allows you to remove material from small exact places where a straight cutting edge would force you into scraping larger areas.

An added advantage is that a small penknife is so cheap you can put one into each case. Every couple of years, take them all out and sharpen them when you have Sharpening Sunday. Unfortunately, the reed clippers that you also need one in each case, are still expensive.
 

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Back in the early '70s Mike Rod said that if a reed, fresh out of the box didn't work, he'd crush the tip and throw it away.
I still have the reed knife my teacher gave me in '59 as a gift when I was 12.
 

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Back in the early '70s Mike Rod said that if a reed, fresh out of the box didn't work, he'd crush the tip and throw it away.
I still have the reed knife my teacher gave me in '59 as a gift when I was 12.
Well, I don't know who Mike Rod is/was, but I work for a living. At something like $7 a whack for baritone reeds, that's just plain silly. I hope Mike Rod had a pantload of money to waste on reeds since he was too precious to pull a penknife or clipper out of his pocket and adjust the thing.
 

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I made a very capable reed knife out of an old straight razor I picked up at a pawn shop for maybe $3. I just ground down the main thin part of the blade so the blade wasn't too flexible. It's easy to sharpen too, as the thick rib can rest on the stone, putting the blade at the correct angle. I cut some plexiglass (I was messing about with that stuff at the time) and layered 3 pieces to make a handle.

I made one for a friend/colleague at the time (1980s), he is a much better oboist than I was, and a few years ago he showed it to a friend of his that makes knives. He sent me another one with a beautiful Grenadilla wood handle with a silver band in the middle.

Of course, I never use it as I don't play oboe anymore - one of the benefits of not having to play for a living.
 

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Well, I don't know who Mike Rod is/was, but I work for a living. At something like $7 a whack for baritone reeds, that's just plain silly. I hope Mike Rod had a pantload of money to waste on reeds since he was too precious to pull a penknife or clipper out of his pocket and adjust the thing.
Mike graduated Juilliard as a saxophone student and demanded that his masters degree would be in saxophone as he was paying for that course of study.
First to get that sheepskin.
Lots of feathers in his cap.
Fun guy and died way too young.

My buddy was dating his younger sister so that's how we met for the second time.
 

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I have a Kalmen Opperman reed knife that I bought in the 70's. It's basically a straight razor with a handle. I never got the hang of adjusting reeds even though I took some lessons from Joe Allard. Joe was amazing with that reed knife.
 
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