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probably this is the reason of such an alarm, like Dry Rot or Black Rot.

The same thing with things being green, they are different and not equally harmful but people get anxious all the same
 

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probably this is the reason of such an alarm, like Dry Rot or Black Rot.

The same thing with things being green, they are different and not equally harmful but people get anxious all the same
I have been experimenting with carnuba wax. It seems to yield great results and says it dosent hurt a clear coat. Here is a couple pics to share the results. Id love yalls I put to let me know if this was a good or bad idea.
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Looks very good!

Carnauba wax is one of the many waxes that is recommended to preserve Brass & Bronze ( for example the unlacquered horns) ,

wax it with 3M premium paste wax (carnauba, great because it keeps it preserved even from UV radiation) or meguiars liquid carnauba.

I think that the apparent cleaning of the red oxidation was caused more from the mechanical action of rubbing the wax onto the neck than from the wax itself as a cleaning agent
 
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Awesome news. I think that the guy I got it from was leaving a sweaty neck strap on top of it resulting in the lacquer wear and oxidation.. I treated the bell also and it looks so much better. I am still waiting for a couple parts to come in but I think things are going to work out great. This is my first tenor, first repair job,, and first Yamaha. It needed case repair and turned out to need a little work but I picked it up for only $200 so I'm pretty happy. :)
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Bb: great job! Here's another CLR job but with no polishing. I am crazy about that contrast between the clean, flat brass and the glossy lacquer.



Here is 'whole sax' hand polishing after CLR. Hard to spot the raw brass but its of course lighter than the lacquered areas. The raw brass will rather quickly get the 'flat' look but the lacquer stays 'bright'.



If you wanted to devote more time per year on maintenance, a totally de-lacquered or unlacquered sax can be maintained with Pledge. Its not a metal polish per se, but does remove and control tarnish with repeated use - the metal will still 'age' but it just won't be ugly. I think most players can get by with 3 times a year or less with less playing. My Selmer USA alto was starting to get red and green corrosion on it as well as the funk of many years on the floor on a stand in dance clubs, outdoor gigs, etc. and with basically no cleaning. I don't have pics on this but take my word, one cleaning with Pledge had astonishing results on it.
I was in a music store recently having some necks adjusted and mentioned the use of Pledge - only to find out the shop uses it all the time - really, the only thing they use for brass instruments.
 

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I鈥檓 curious to know how that Dolnet bari holds up after CLR and brasso. It looks awesome now! I have a H Couf bari that looked very similar and I have to polish it every few months to keep it up.
 

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I鈥檓 curious to know how that Dolnet bari holds up after CLR and brasso. It looks awesome now! I have a H Couf bari that looked very similar and I have to polish it every few months to keep it up.
I鈥檒l let you know in the coming months, but I鈥檓 hoping that the wax automotive coating keeps it maintained for longer.
 

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I鈥檒l let you know in the coming months, but I鈥檓 hoping that the wax automotive coating keeps it maintained for longer.
I can appreciate the patina a sax which makes them look older and vintage. I personally like shiny and think that it makes them look new. Man your Martin looks top notch and the polishing really helps feature the stenciling. You did a good job man and I also am looking forward to you reposting on this thread in 6 and 12 months from now to let us know how things are holding up.

I recently was at an auto parts store and I saw that the new generations of Auto Wax contain a "ceramic coating". It is a bit more expensive than the other options are. Have you or anyone else used any of those products or have any opinions on them?

I have been using this Mothers California Gold with Carnuba. It dosent require the CLR step which has an lactic and gluconic acid base that I "think" removed your lacquer. Mothers seems to leave the lacquer and says its safe for all clear coats. It might not work as fast as CLR but I believe that is is less abrasive if one wants to keep the lacquer.
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The CLR didn鈥檛 remove any lacquer, only helped to remove the red rot.
The dark areas on the horn are where the lacquer remains.
CLR is not really abrasive and it really had no affect on removing lacquer.
The brasso was more abrasive but still not enough to have any noticeable affect on the lacquer.
There was little lacquer remaining in the horn when I got it and it is still there now.
The shiny parts are the areas where there was red rot but no lacquer.
I鈥檝e never used the Mothers carnauba wax, but it looks like it would be a good protectant for bare brass.
 

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The car wax will help maintain the raw brass and protect any remaining lacquer but it is harder to use if you're doing the entire horn because it leaves a residue that must be wiped from every spot. That's just how it works - you apply it, wait for it to dry, then wipe it off which leaves the shine. With most 'cleaner-wax', it contains abrasives. If it leaves a powdery substance where it dries, that's the abrasive. Its not particularly bad for the metal or lacquer, but my concern is where it gets into the moving parts and combines with the oil to make a 'cutting oil'. I've used most every kind of product on saxes over the years but my search stopped when I tried Pledge. Simply the best maintenance treatment there is for brass instruments. You might initially need something stronger for tarnish/corrosion but after that, if you use it at least once a year, you should have no more problem.
 
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