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(formerly borganiboy)
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Sounding nice here. As for all you asked your room can be a big factor in your sound. I've been recording a lot over a year now and I never stop messing about on my stuff. Can drive you mad.
 

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Self confessed GAS monster! Forum Contributor 2013
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sounds very nice, the playing is very sweet, laid back and the record quality is fine.
Some people use compression but i never use compression, i try to record as raw as possible, flat EQ, a touch of reverb and mic placement is important to find the "sweet spot" that you like and it is different for us all as we like different tones, you will find yours. I think your recording quality is good, no need to mess around too much with it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hi guys, thanks a lot for replying! Yeah I have used a touch of compression and eq on this to reduce slightly the nasal frequencies that I find pop out on my alto sound. Aiming not to use too much though. Also trying to deaden my room and experiment with mic placement. Any suggestions that you find work well in regards to mic placement? Or does it change from room to room?
 

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(formerly borganiboy)
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Every room is different so every mic placement is. As a rule I go about 2 to 3 feet away and aim the mic off to the right towards the low B key holes. I don't point the mic towards the bell. Just try lots of places in your room, its a case of keep looking till you find it.
 

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Self confessed GAS monster! Forum Contributor 2013
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i also do not point mic at the middle of the bell, more towards the top of the bell and left hand keys around 2 feet away, that seems to be my sweet spot at the moment on tenor but it could change with different saxes i play.
 

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Your recording sounded good in my ears, mabye missing a bit of the higher frequencies (difficult to judge, because I don't know your natural sound).

I make simple home recordings for TOTM threads here on SOTW since late 2010. Try to sound as natural as possible, only add some reverb to match the backing track (as if recorded in the same room). Also always listen on differenent equipement (headphone and boxes) and at different volumes to get the best ratio mixing with the backing track (you should be able to hear the backing at very low volumes, otherwise your sax track is too loud).

I always recorded playing standing up with the mic on a table in front of me on a distance of about 80 to 100 centimeter. My last two recordings (done this month) where played sitting down on a chair in front of the table, with the mic on the edge of the table pointing about 45 degrees downwards to the bell of the horn, on a distance of about 40 to 60 cm. I seems like the mic picked up some more mids and lows in that position. Like Davey and Ian mentioned, room and mic position play a big role in recording your sax. You just have to experiment to find your preferred recording position.
 

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First: that is really very nice. No need to change anything.
You could think of some more high frequencies, for the guitar especially, but this is taste.
I DO use compressor (not much), anyway the recorded sound is never the same than what is heard directly, so an absolute raw, unchanged recording is not necessarily natural. Compressing is justified also because of the changes in volume and tone by moving around with the sax (if you have no clip mic).

I am doing amateur recording for my bands and for the net in my bed room...
 

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I think you sound beautiful here. Not sure what you were going for soundwise, but I think there's a nice mystique to the sound and as I tend to like the dark round type tones (Seamus Blake, Charles McPherson) I wouldn't change a thing. Sure, you could move around a bit or whatever depending on what your tastes are...just saying your sound and recording quality are working great to my ears.

Fwiw, I never use eq ever anymore. The caveat with that is having a mic with a fairly flat and balanced (natural) sound. Guess I'd roll off the mids a touch if I was recording with an SM57 or something.

Funny, in a really "live" room (e.g. hardwood floors, etc) I kind of dig the totally dry sound with no effects from maybe 5 even 6 feet away. But, it has to be totally quiet for that to work (which is rarely the case for me).
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Great! Cheers for the comments guys! I have heard a couple of other people tell me that they tend to not use eq, I have used a little here to try and remove a little of the nasal frequencies that seem to pop out quite easily on alto. I also did use a little light compression but only a little.

I agree with you Mister Lyrical, think its part of the reason I spent along time not really liking much of what I had recorded.
 
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