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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking for a new mouthpiece to replace my old one. I had a hard rubber mouthpiece that I accidently cracked, however it wasn't a very well known manufacturer and I cannot remember what I had.

I was suggested to try a Meyer and Eugene Rousseau. I play for both Pep Band and Concert Band so I'd ideally like a mouthpiece that will work for both however I'm willing to buy two if I get good suggestions.

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I play a Yamaha YAS-52, the intermediate model. I'd like something that would produce a nice solid and full sound. I need to be able to project my sound over the trumpets and trombones in pep band, and be able to blend for concert band.
 

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I was suggested to try a Meyer and Eugene Rousseau. I play for both Pep Band and Concert Band so I'd ideally like a mouthpiece that will work for both...
A Meyer type mouthpiece will work for both. Some folks will recommend a "classical" type mouthpiece such as the standard Selmer S-80 for concert band. But considering that concert band music isn't always strictly classical and can focus more on pop/contemporary music these days, a Meyer type mouthpiece should be fine for most concert band applications. I seriously doubt most high school band directors even care what mouthpieces are used, other than those prejudiced against metal mouthpieces, so long as everyone is in tune.
 

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There are all kinds of mouthpieces out there. Metal, plastic, rubber, resin, wood... There are expensive mouthpieces, handmade models, vintage models...

Here's the deal. If your a high school student, get a Brilhart 3* and a Rico 2½ reed and learn how to play. Seriously, I'm not saying this to be glib. Go learn how to play on basic equipment. It's cheaper that way. A new Brilhart alto mouthpiece only costs $30 or so.
 

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well the general consensus in concert bands i've seen is that they think that a metal mpc is automatically loud (not at all true) so if you want to repeat that a thousand times... The standard equipment for students in concert bands here (Netherlands) is mostly the selmer s80 with a 2/2.5 vandoren blue box.

If you are a bit further ahead you could try a soloist or maybe a meyer, I played like ¾ year on a Tone Edge but the soloist stole my heart, we play mostly light (you`re standard musical/film themes) and classical music (operettes (nabucco +1), chorals, and the occasional paso doble)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'm actually in College and have been playing on the basic equipment all throughout high school and college. I'm ready to upgrade and buy something of better quality. I bought a hard rubber mpc because it was recommended back in high school to replace the plastic one I had been using.
 

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Brilhart Ebolin 3*.
Yeach! I learned on one of those (no idea of it's age, but it was old in 1988 when my Mom bought my gold epoxy Bundy Alto). It was full of resistance, and does not speak overtones well.

If you are needing for the Jazz as well as concert band, you will need a piece that speaks the overtone series without fighting it!

My favorites are:

Selmer Soloist (to include the "Soloist style" pieces of the 1970 with the "D" shaped chamber)
WS Sumner (an Otto Link or Meyer like piece, depending on what run of Sumner you find)
any Drake, Phil-Tone, or "Doc" Tenney mouthpiece!

I prefer vintage Meyers to new ones, but to go vintage, you have to buy from someone that won't inflate the price!
 

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Claude Lakey, BAM!
Too bright and inconsistent! They're decent though if you can find a good one! But I would never play one in concert band! You'd stick out like a sore thumb! Great lead Alto jazz piece on the cheap though (again, if you can find a good one!)
 

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meyer, meyer, meyer. The last piece you'll ever need. Play smooth or unleash it. The choice is yours.
 

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Yeach! I learned on one of those (no idea of it's age, but it was old in 1988 when my Mom bought my gold epoxy Bundy Alto). It was full of resistance, and does not speak overtones well.

If you are needing for the Jazz as well as concert band, you will need a piece that speaks the overtone series without fighting it!

My favorites are:

Selmer Soloist (to include the "Soloist style" pieces of the 1970 with the "D" shaped chamber)
WS Sumner (an Otto Link or Meyer like piece, depending on what run of Sumner you find)
any Drake, Phil-Tone, or "Doc" Tenney mouthpiece!

I prefer vintage Meyers to new ones, but to go vintage, you have to buy from someone that won't inflate the price!
Yeah, like anything else, they're not all good ones. But a student should start on something cheap but functional. A Brilhart is both. Sure, some of them suck but the same is true about Meyers, Selmers and Vandorens.

I always tell students to start on Brilharts. Besides, they are versatile. You can play any style, loud or soft with these things.
 

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Concert and Pep Band huh? A lot depends upon the sax you play as a Selmer S80 C* won't sound or feel the same on your YAS-52 as it would on a Selmer sax! It's crazy but trying out different mouthpieces until you find one that "clicks" is the best way. Now, that being said, you need a mouthpiece that works for you in a concert setting. You want a mouthpiece that projects sound and works for you in a pep band setting. Preferably, you'd like a single mouthpiece for both situations. My suggestion would be to try a Meyer if you can find one. Selmer C*'s are a good middle-of-the-road mouthpiece but they are pricey and their quality has been somewhat inconsistent as of late. I have a Yamaha 4D which I use on my Selmer 162. It's not as rich as the C* but it has much less resistance when blowing and it allows for a louder "punch" when playing. Do you have to limit yourself to just one mouthpiece? Using a cheaper plastic one for pep band while saving the high-end rubber one for concert band might be the answer.
 
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