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Discussion Starter #1
I'm experimenting with different mouthpieces on my Buescher True Tone '29. Would like some input from fellow SOTW-ers.

I'm looking for something darker than the vintage Meyers. The closest sound to what I'm looking for is the Ted Klum Acoustimax. Here's a soundclip on Steve Neff's (aka known as fellow SOTW-er Nefertiti) blog.

Now, I would like something just a tad darker than the Acoustimax.
 

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Have you tried an Otto Link Tone Edge or Super Tone Master?
 

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I'm experimenting with different mouthpieces on my Buescher True Tone '29. Would like some input from fellow SOTW-ers.

I'm looking for something darker than the vintage Meyers. The closest sound to what I'm looking for is the Ted Klum Acoustimax. Here's a soundclip on Steve Neff's (aka known as fellow SOTW-er Nefertiti) blog.

Now, I would like something just a tad darker than the Acoustimax.
Majority of Vintage MeYers I have tried are darker than my AcoustiMax. but if you want something darker than the Acoustimax check out the Acoustimer.
 

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I am convinced that Ted is the best. If his piece isn't dark enough, maybe you can ask to have a darker one made? Or try a darker reed like a Vando blue box, hemke, etc.

Props to Aaron Drake, too: my other favorite. Ted's pieces are more in line with my concept, but I feel like Aaron can make anything if you can describe what you want accurately enough.
 

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As soon as I heard the soundclip you referred to, my mind went immediately to the Tone Edge 6 I play with my Barone vintage alto.
That's the sound I get with it.
 

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Runyon are decent mouthpieces, but none of them I would label as "dark". What is your budget? For $400 or so Aaron Drake can make you one from Ceramic that would more than do what you ask of it. I play on a Drake Custom prototype on my Alto when I need "dark", and his Drake Contemporary Hybrid for everything else.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Student budget I'm afraid. $200 is my absolute maximum.

So, the SR isn't even darker than a vintage Meyer? I would imagine that something suitable for big band, according to the website, should be relatively dark. I suppose there's a gap between marketing and reality.
 

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.... I would imagine that something suitable for big band, according to the website, should be relatively dark. ...
not really.... Check out Steve Wilson, Jerry Dodgion, Dick Oatts, and Bob Sheppard on alto, Charlie Mariano, Jackie McLean. i wouldn't consider those guys that dark.

and darker doesn't give us much to go on unless we know what mouthpiece YOU are currently playing on.We can say tons of things are darker than so to speak a Dukoff D.

And you mention playing in a big band but there are so many different tonal colors, and so many players with so many different sound concepts that it's nearly impossible for us to give you an idea of what you want because ultimately we are all different. What might be bright to me might be just right for you and what might be dark to you might be just right for me etc... it's probably the best to get a teacher and sit down with him/her and talk things out try to and figure something out.

sorry about the rant.
Jack
 

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For the sake of continuity on this thread, let's say this:

Caravan/Rascher = Dark
Florida Dukoff/Berg Larson/Jody Jazz DV = Bright

There are MANY mouthpieces, in many price ranges that fit in the middle, and some that break even both of the extreme boundries. For a lead Alto piece, dark is not what you want! For a 2nd Alto piece, dark, with some "punch" or "edge" is a good thing, so as to blend, but not be railroaded by the lead Alto, but still have enough "edge" to solo (2nd Altos get solos too!).

How big is this "big band". Are talking a full sax section (AATTB) or a reduced sax section (ATB)? Or somewhere in between? What styles are you mostly playing? Funk? Rock? 20s? 30s? 40s? 50s? Rock-a-billy? Sometimes that directors sound concept is more important than your own, for unit cohesion, in which case, ask him what he/she's after as far as overall tone. This is why I have 2 or 3 mouthpieces per sax. Yes, my style leans one direction, but a mouthpiece that leans in another, will mute the bright style, or brighten the dark style. Reed choice plays a roll as well.
 

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WC Sumners are also very good, and lean to the dark side. Used to have one on Tenor, now I wish I never got rid of it!
 

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Student budget I'm afraid. $200 is my absolute maximum.

So, the SR isn't even darker than a vintage Meyer? I would imagine that something suitable for big band, according to the website, should be relatively dark. I suppose there's a gap between marketing and reality.
Get a Vandoren V16 (an A5 or an A6). It's a great mouthpiece for a student and not bright at all.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
not really.... Check out Steve Wilson, Jerry Dodgion, Dick Oatts, and Bob Sheppard on alto, Charlie Mariano, Jackie McLean. i wouldn't consider those guys that dark.

and darker doesn't give us much to go on unless we know what mouthpiece YOU are currently playing on.We can say tons of things are darker than so to speak a Dukoff D.

And you mention playing in a big band but there are so many different tonal colors, and so many players with so many different sound concepts that it's nearly impossible for us to give you an idea of what you want because ultimately we are all different. What might be bright to me might be just right for you and what might be dark to you might be just right for me etc... it's probably the best to get a teacher and sit down with him/her and talk things out try to and figure something out.

sorry about the rant.
Jack
Don't worry Jack. Offense wasn't given nor was it taken. Thanks for the rant.

I'm currently playing classical mouthpieces - especially Rascher. I like the hollow part of the tone but it lacks on the expressive side.
I have a V16 A5. Nice, but too bright. I had a current Meyer 5M - way too bright.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
There are MANY mouthpieces, in many price ranges that fit in the middle, and some that break even both of the extreme boundries. For a lead Alto piece, dark is not what you want! For a 2nd Alto piece, dark, with some "punch" or "edge" is a good thing, so as to blend, but not be railroaded by the lead Alto, but still have enough "edge" to solo (2nd Altos get solos too!).

How big is this "big band". Are talking a full sax section (AATTB) or a reduced sax section (ATB)? Or somewhere in between? What styles are you mostly playing? Funk? Rock? 20s? 30s? 40s? 50s? Rock-a-billy? Sometimes that directors sound concept is more important than your own, for unit cohesion, in which case, ask him what he/she's after as far as overall tone. This is why I have 2 or 3 mouthpieces per sax. Yes, my style leans one direction, but a mouthpiece that leans in another, will mute the bright style, or brighten the dark style. Reed choice plays a roll as well.
I'm mostly playing classical at this stage. And the mouthpieces I have are more than sufficient for the classical genre. But I would like something a tad brighter when I have to play in other settings that's not classical. I do not need to get much volume. A loud honker isn't necessary. Then, to use your words, a mouthpiece for 2nd alto with some punch might be something I'd be interested in. And, yes, reeds can make a substantial difference. But the mouthpieces I currently have can't reach the tone I'm looking for by experimenting with reeds.
 
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