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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, yet another recital program thread. :D

I'm doing my senior undergrad recital in April and have half my program about decided, but need to nail down what unaccompanied piece and what concerto (or concerto-like piece) will be part of the program.

So far:

Husa - Elegie et Rondeau
Bozza - Aria
Yoshimatsu - Fuzzy Bird (1st mvmt, may look at 2nd too)

That might be a nebulous order too.

The puzzle is: my teacher wants something traditional or French in there, possibly the concerto. Or the unaccompanied.

For example, if I did a Noda improvisation, I would need a very traditional rep (French) concerto.

If I did a transcription or other traditional unaccompanied, I wouldn't be as locked in on the concerto. It can't be too "new" though, as I have that base covered already.

Any suggestions for this puzzle? Concertos that are fun to play and fun for the listener?

Only caveat is it can't be too crazy hard as I already have a lot to be getting on with, and length is getting up there already, it looks like 45-50 min once the holes are plugged in. What's funny is, Music Ed is only required to do 30 min - but I'm doing a BA, and not even required to do a recital... :)
 

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Groove,
Looks like you will have a nice program for your recital. I'm not sure how everyone else feels about Fuzzy Bird, but I would hesitate to break the piece up. The first and second movement can stand alone pretty well, but the first alone does not work, in my opinion. It's very audience friendly, but ending on that V chord always strains my ear, especially when you dont resolve it with the opening of the second movement.

Just my thoughts.
Steve P
 

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I like the Claremont Concerto. It's not as famous as others like the Glazunov or Ibert, but just as good. Listening to it a couple times, it doesn't appear to be as hard as either one. It's also much more audience friendly then those two as well, imo. Gwozdz has a recording of it on his Concerto Tribute.
 

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For unaccompanied pieces you could look at Improvisation et Caprice by Bozza, Walter Hartley's Petite Suite, the Noda compositions are great. these are the ones that come to mind right away, but there are alot of pieces out there.

As far as French pieces go look at the Desenclos Prelude Cadence et Finale, the Maurice Tableaux de Provence they are really good.

If you havn't studied the Ibert or the Glazounov I would do one of those. Very standard you need to know them. The Larsson concerto is great as is the Martin Ballade but you need serious altissimo for these.

These are just a few that come to mind right now but there are so many pieces to do. I would suggest listening to some recordngs and pick pieces you like.

Chris

P.S. I agree with Steve P. Don't break up the Fuzzy Bird Sonata. I would try to do the entire piece. Things sound incomplete when the piece is broken up.
 

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you might also try doing a few of the massis (or is it masis) caprices or some of the karg elerts.
 

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I've always enjoyed playing Syrinx. Debussy? Unaccompanied. May not be as "challenging" as you "need" to play for the recital, but I really enjoyed it as an undergrad.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for all the suggestions! :D As far as the Fuzzy Bird, I agree about not breaking it up, but I'm really not sure about the 3rd mvmt., the improvisational jazz stuff, I'm afraid it starts to lose the listener there a little, at least our normal recital audience. But I do really want to do the 2nd mvmt. ;)

I have done Ibert and Glazunov, and the graduating guys before me always had one of them on their recitals, so I really want to "step out of the box" some, at least as far as traditional rep.

For the unaccompanied, I'm leaning toward a transcription, or a pretty French piece (though Noda is still a cool option)

The Desenclos Prelude, Cadence et Finale is a great piece, my teacher in high school (who my professor also taught) did that in a recital and I remember I was awed by it. Also the Boutry Divertimento is another piece I have long liked.

I would feel funny not doing a concerto though, since that's the norm and usually the "meat" in the recital.

One problem is there's just so much I haven't heard! But the Creston, Tomasi, and Dubois, those may be options, and my teacher mentioned Finney, any favorites among those?

~Greta
 

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Alec Wilder Saxophone Sonata is always nice. It's very audience friendly, but has some fun technique stuff. I know it's not a concerto, but it's a good solid work.

There's always Scaramouche - which I LOVE, both as a listener and a performer, but then again, prolly done to death in college.
 

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How about the Henk Badings Concerto?
 

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Erland von Koch Concerto? One of my absolute favorite among our concerti. Easily accessible by the audience, and as long as you have decent control over altissimo (you're doing the fuzzy bird, so this probably isn't too much of anissue) it's not incredibly difficult.
 

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mike_s said:
you might also try doing a few of the massis (or is it masis) caprices or some of the karg elerts.
Do you mean Gerard Massias?
(assuming so...)You might also want to look into his piece "Suite Monodique" my tenor friend here at NCSA played it, it's rock'n.

Also if you happen to have a Soprano try playing "Mysterious Morning III," I just melt whenever I hear this played (well).
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Lots of fun possibilities...will do some investigating!

I'm actually working on Scaramouche right now, but I don't know if I'll get to do the whole thing depending on time in studio recital..that piece is just so fun to practice. My favorite movement is the last one.

Henk Badings, I didn't realize he wrote a Concerto, I bet that's interesting! Any particular recordings? The von Koch I haven't heard. The altissimo in Fuzzy Bird is challenging certainly (which makes the 2nd mvmt soo hard), though working on a fun piece like that will be a huge help for becoming more fluent.

And I go to school at Lamar University in Beaumont, which is like east of Houston about 90 min, nice area, midsize school, smaller but very good music department. My teacher is Dr. Kim Ellis, she does clarinet and saxophone here. Since the late 90s some fine players have come out of her studio, one or two a year, though lately there aren't many sax majors. Her former students mostly teach band now in this general area.
 

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I second the suggestion of Caprice en Forme de Valse by Bonneau. Fantastic unaccompanied piece - I like it because it doesn't just sound like free rhythm all the time like some of the Nodas do.

Also worth looking into is the four-movement Sonata by Fernande Decruck. A very sonorous, well-crafted piece gaining some acclaim. Good program selection so far though!
 

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Well I disagree with the concerto being the "meat" of a recital. I guess it is all on different pedagogy across the board. Do you really HAVE to play a concerto for your recital? There are plenty of pieces out there that could be considered meaty without actually being a concerto.
 

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I think it's helpful to learn a few concerti to perform with piano in degree recitals. A perfect situation for a dry run before showtime.

Milhaud Scaramouche is a good choice. Also Dubois Concerto is straightforward enough and very accessible. If you play soprano, don't forget Villa-Lobos, or Nyman's "Shaping the Curve" which is a sketch for his ultra-fun concerto "Where the Bee Dances".

Don't rule out concertos with band, as many opportunities can come this way. Dry runs of Whitney's "Introduction and Samba", Alfred Reed "Ballade", etc, can get you ready for performances with professional or community bands somewhere down the line (or your own eventually, if you're an ed major!).

So many possibilities.

Angel
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Updated: I'm going to do the 1st and 2nd mvmts of Fuzzy Bird, we decided the Husa kind of counts as a concerto, and I'm thinking of doing a Noda piece for unaccompanied. (Maybe Phoenix.)

I would like to add a short transcription, with piano, and was curious what some favorites of yours are. :)

Has anyone done the Mahler Ruckert-Lieder by Hemke? Is that one song from the lieder? The Bach by Mule also looks interesting.

Two more questions:

Good recordings of Elegie et Rondeau with orchestra? Those seem to be hard to find. I'm trying to better understand the piano part and I would love to hear the original.

And what did anyone who has done Phoenix do with the Japanese poem? :D
 

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Last I played Noda's Phoenix (on my master's recital) I split the Japanese poem up to be spoken during the piece...meaning, I played a section of the work (by memory) and had my friend (She is Japanese) read the poem in between the sections...an unconventional way to perform the piece, but it went over very well. The lights were off, except for a small light so that my friend could read the poem.

As far as recordings with orchestra of the Husa, I believe that Gwozdz has recording of it. For a recording with piano check out K. Tse's.
 
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