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I've been playing around with the coolest new DAW software, called "Reaper." I think although I'm still learning some of the ins and outs I will not be upgrading to Cubase 6 and instead going with this, at 1/5 the price!

www.reaper.fm/

Also, check these videos:





 

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Have I not been preaching the Gospel of Reaper as the low cost alternatice to full fledge DAW systems like Protools?

It's a great piece of software at a great price for the entry level non professional user. It wont replace Protools in my tool kit, but as a quick down and dirty recording platform it cant be beat.
 

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Have I not been preaching the Gospel of Reaper as the low cost alternatice to full fledge DAW systems like Protools?

It's a great piece of software at a great price for the entry level non professional user. It wont replace Protools in my tool kit, but as a quick down and dirty recording platform it cant be beat.
I find the way it does routing makes it awesome for mixing. I can chain any plugin I want into any plugin I want and buss things anywhere.
 

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I've been using it for the last couple months and couldn't agree more - perfect for the home recordist. I can see why you would want Pro Tools in a studio, but I don't see why for a single person operation you couldn't do everything you want using Reaper. I too will not be upgrading Cubase, and using the money I save by doing that to buy that nice NI Komplete kit.

As an ex-MIDI programmer, I find the inclusion of the JS scripting engine wonderful. I created this nice plugin called CC-MultiT which allows me to split and scale multiple CC streams from a single controller. Great for controlling VSTi's using my WX5...
 

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I'm a newbie and just getting used to Cubase LE1 which came bundled with the interface I bought around a year ago when I set up up my recording den. I've recently seen lots of references to Reaper and noticed that it's getting some pretty high praise from some pretty experienced people, so I downloaded the demo version which surprisingly is not restricted in any way and had a play.

It looks neat and I managed to get a recording down by just being intuitive and without looking at the manual, but I hit the brick wall when I wanted to do some other stuff. I spent 5 minutes, for instance, trying to find out how to link channels until I realised that just highlighting them linked them automatically. When I downloaded the manual, 400 pages, my heart sank at the thought of ditching over a year's worth of getting to know Cubase LE and starting all over again with Reaper.

So the basic question is should I stick with Cubase LE1 or bite the bullet and get to grips with Reaper - what say you all?
 

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You can't beat the Reaper! I recommend it to all of my students, and used it in class to introduce DAWs to them.
 

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After just a couple of hours with Reaper and its brilliant, excellent user manual I'm doing things that I wouldn't even have contemplated trying to do with Cubase LE. There's now no question that I'm changing to Reaper, it's a no brainer.

I have to say though that 'All Through The Night' around which the user manual's fx examples are built is very rapidly changing from a song I've always loved, (especially Sammy Nestico's concert band arrangement), to one I'm beginning to hate!!!!
 

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Seems to depend on how the brain is wired as to wether or not Reaper, Cubase, audacity, or others fit best with a given user. They all seem to get the job done. Sony has some great audio tools out there too.
 

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Seems to depend on how the brain is wired as to wether or not Reaper, Cubase, audacity, or others fit best with a given user. They all seem to get the job done. Sony has some great audio tools out there too.
Definitely. Whenever I'm asked which video editor is best, I tell them to download the trial versions, give them a run and see which one works closest to the way they think. There is no "Best" only the Best for YOU.

In fact, while I edit on Avid, Vegas, VIdeo ProX, I just downloaded Lightworks and haven't had a real chance to play with it yet, but it shows real promise, especially for the price. (It was used to cut "The King's Speech", and the plan is to port it to Linux 4qtr 2011)
 

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Tired it a couple of times, but found it uncomfortable to work with. (and awful to look at all day) I have to say it works nicer on my PC than on the Mac, which is what I use for everything. Also, I miss some kind of notation. So, I'll stick to Digital Performer, PT, and Ableton Live.
 
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