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Discussion Starter #1
I usually play a Yamaha 62 with an Otto Link STM 7* with V16 3 reeds.
Due to school issues I was forced to play a Buescher Aristocrat 200.
The upper register, starting from G and up, begin getting really sharp. The high C gets to be a good 20 cents sharp.
Knowing that I do not change embouchure while going higher up on the register, what can be causing this?
 

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Well, either your mouthpiece is "in" too much (on what note do you tune?), or your instrument is badly set up (keys too open) or it just s***s, don't you think?
 

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Just the opposite. Push the piece all the way in. Play low B, then add the octave key to make the B go up an octave. Tune that 'long' B with the regular B.

My guess is your embouchure will have to relax to do this. Now play with that feeling, and see if your intonation improves.

If that's not it, it's the horn, and you'll have to change your embouchure as you play to adjust.
 

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Hakunani,

Why should Alex "push" his pmc "all the way in", thereby creating a situation where the neck of the sax will reach into the chamber of the mpc? I don't think anyone would be able to play in tune that way?
 

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Hak may be referring to this concept, articulated beautifully by Stephen Duke. Even without changing embouchure at all, if it is too tight, the saxophone will not play in tune with itself, as the excessive pressure will have an increasingly sharpening effect on short-tube notes. The article has an elegant graph that clarifies this--it's well worth a read.
 

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Well, there's all the way, then there's all the way. I don't mean force the piece until it can't go any more. I've found that most folks play with the piece out too far. The problem is usually not that the upper octave is sharp, but that the lower octave is flat, from players exerting too much jaw pressure. The procedure I outlined above helps to find the right spot on the mouthpiece to play in tune in both octaves.

There is a wonderful article published by yamaha on this, but I can't seem to find it right now...

edit: Thanks, Jim. I need to bookmark that pesky thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Tuning on a concert Bb, normal and lower octaves are in tune.
On my 62 there is no problem, and I sound essentially the same on any mouthpiece I play, without any tuning issues.
But, along with the Bundy II that I tried, the Buescher seemed to give me many tuning issues.
I'll test when I get to school tomorrow.
 

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Sounds like it may be that the horn is out of adjustment...or wonky on intonation. Even bueschers have less than stellar individual horns. I remember a 10M that I had to fight through a gig to get to play. Pretty, silver plated horn, that was a dog...
 

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A mouthpiece mismatch is also possible--but seems unlikely with a Link STM. It may be that the scale of this horn simply demands a more relaxed embouchure than you are accustomed to.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Going to go complain about it. Or try a couple other mouthpieces on it. Metalite m7 and Link Tone Edge 6. Maybe the Tone Edge can fix it...?
I don't want to bring my 62 to school in fear of random kids messing around with it. The people at our school can be jerks sometimes. And considering my 62 is quite a good horn I don't want to put it at risk.
 

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this concept--it's well worth a read.
So it is! And I did Drakesax, thanks. Before Alex decides it is him, he'd better make sure it's not his instrument, or mpc or the combination though.
I wonder if the flexibility in embouchure that I think Stephen Duke is aiming for could not also be accomplished by playing (songs and scales) on the mpc alone; apart from a flexible embouchure the students also learns the concept of air support in this way.
 

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maybe part of the issue is your yami is out of tune, and you're instinctively lipping??? The results seem a little extreme but still...worth a shot(?)
 

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One exercise I really like for getting a feel of just how flexible the tuning of the sax really is:

Play one note that feels sharp to you along with a piano or some other tuning note--B3 is good--for several long tones to really get the sound "in your ear," then do the same with the next half tone down. Then, go back to B3, but try to play that Bb tone again. This will feel weird. However, when you go back to playing the original B3 normally, you'll be suprised how easy it is to play it in tune or even flat.

R.
 
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