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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sure, they are useful if you want to jam some with people you've never met before, but recently I wanted to play some tunes and there were some mistakes in them, or at least things that just didn't seem logical to me.

For example, "All the things you are": bar 7, the second measure is actually Db-6/C and the fourth measure is actually Cb° (both in concert), according to my piano teacher (who is a respected jazz player). I myself wouldn't have found the correct chord.
Of course, this can all be relative, but I must say that E7(#9) and Cb° are quite different. I played this with the Aebersold song and the first one sounded horrible, while the second one was fine.
I checked the chords of this song on songtrellis.com and these were also completely different.

Now I want to play "Miles Ahead", and again, some things just sound wrong, and the chord progression seems illogical to me (not that I know that much about music theory, but some chords just don't seem right, like in the seventh bar, BbMaj7 followed by GbMaj7 ?)
Or the last melody note, E, over an Abm6 chord? Would anyone care to confirm these chords, or give the correct ones?

Of course every jazz musician has his own interpretations of a song (if you say "let's play a blues", you can have quite some different progressions, but they are all logical, though).

I just don't trust realbooks anymore.
 

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remember, there are always different versions of standards, for instance, the in session with charlie parker book transcribes a section of yardbird suite 'wrongly' but it was performed like that once, and that recording was what they transcribed from, but you should normally get by at a session with real book stuff, don't lose faith!!
 

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I've been told that the New Real Books are the most accurate. Also recommended by Mark Levine in his Jazz Theory Book. Of course they share the same publisher - Sher.
 

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There's lots of good and bad things about the real book but don't take those changes as the 10 Commandments alot of the chords are optional as in one choice out of many some are just plain wrong. Working with it will make you a better player
 

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Hammertime said:
For example, "All the things you are": bar 7, the second measure is actually Db-6/C and the fourth measure is actually Cb° (both in concert), according to my piano teacher (who is a respected jazz player). I myself wouldn't have found the correct chord.
Of course, this can all be relative, but I must say that E7(#9) and Cb° are quite different.
E7(#9) and Cb (let's call it B) dim aren't all that different. The chords share three tones out of five and four, respectively. The third and seventh are the same, just swapped like when using a tri-tone sub. The major difference is the #9, which is simply a colorful extension. Change it to a b9 and you have all the same tones as Bdim, plus your E root.

Like other posters have said -- minor differences from chart to chart offer variety, harmonic progress, better or more interesting voice leading, etc. Most realbook transcriptions are based on definitive recordings of tunes, but books will differ in their use of recordings, which will result in a slightly different arrangement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Oh wait, now that you say it :D Indeed. *Blushes*
 
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