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I always am very cautious with reviews. They simply can not deal with the variations you have on several different products of the same series. It is not only the problem with saxophones but also mpcs.
I tried several Series III tenor and alto saxophones and own a soprano one. The variation between between several SIII of the same size can be very high. It was the same with each Selmer Horn. Some play absolutely great, some not, some need some work from a Saxophone technician (repair tech) in order to play great and some will even not play great after some work on them. My soprano was one of the first SIII and i never had another horn that was so problematic regarding mechanics. I played it less than other horns, still it had to get work from a repair tech more often than other horns. It did sound great but the problems kept me from having fun with it. I played another one on a workshop i did and the soprano SIII from the participant played much better than mine but also was much later produced than mine. Before Corona i could try several SIII tenors and altos, some were fantastic, some i would not play even if they would pay me for it.
Also a review never will be able to say anything about whether the horn works for each player, very often different players prefer different horns. In the end everyone interested in a mpc or horn must try it for himself. More interesting is when somebody can give insight how good the mechanic is doing over the years. I had a friend with a Taiwan Soprano where the mechanic was getting problematic after two years and no repair tech wanted to work on it because the problems would resurface very fast. And would i have known the mechanic problems of my SIII soprano i would never have bought it (i was too young when i bought it).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
I always am very cautious with reviews. They simply can not deal with the variations you have on several different products of the same series. It is not only the problem with saxophones but also mpcs.
I tried several Series III tenor and alto saxophones and own a soprano one. The variation between between several SIII of the same size can be very high. It was the same with each Selmer Horn. Some play absolutely great, some not, some need some work from a Saxophone technician (repair tech) in order to play great and some will even not play great after some work on them. My soprano was one of the first SIII and i never had another horn that was so problematic regarding mechanics. I played it less than other horns, still it had to get work from a repair tech more often than other horns. It did sound great but the problems kept me from having fun with it. I played another one on a workshop i did and the soprano SIII from the participant played much better than mine but also was much later produced than mine. Before Corona i could try several SIII tenors and altos, some were fantastic, some i would not play even if they would pay me for it.
Also a review never will be able to say anything about whether the horn works for each player, very often different players prefer different horns. In the end everyone interested in a mpc or horn must try it for himself. More interesting is when somebody can give insight how good the mechanic is doing over the years. I had a friend with a Taiwan Soprano where the mechanic was getting problematic after two years and no repair tech wanted to work on it because the problems would resurface very fast. And would i have known the mechanic problems of my SIII soprano i would never have bought it (i was too young when i bought it).
Agreed. A review can only go so far. Still, there are lots reviews of the yanagisawa, yamaha, p. mauriat, series ii, reference, etc. It's rare to find one of the series iii. I have a 3 month old series iii alto that was ordered directly from the factory in france by my music store and went straight into my hands. It did require some setup from a tech to fix leaks and adjust keys. I would say the sound concept of my horn is very, very close to the reviewers horn in the video. But you're right, every horn can feel and play different. After all, these are hand made instruments.
 

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And that is the beauty of the variability found in hand-made saxophones - two saxes of the same model and serial number range - you might like one and somebody else like another. Something for everybody, so to speak. Manufacturers in industry typically strive to eliminate variability but in musical instruments its not a bad thing.
 

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And that is the beauty of the variability found in hand-made saxophones - two saxes of the same model and serial number range - you might like one and somebody else like another. Something for everybody, so to speak. Manufacturers in industry typically strive to eliminate variability but in musical instruments its not a bad thing.
+1 Agree completely.
 

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And that is the beauty of the variability found in hand-made saxophones - two saxes of the same model and serial number range - you might like one and somebody else like another. Something for everybody, so to speak. Manufacturers in industry typically strive to eliminate variability but in musical instruments its not a bad thing.
I also agree. In addition I reckon some of the said 'issues' come from a not properly setup sax, another factor in the manufacturing variability which fortunately can be corrected. Selmer has a reputation for not having had a consistent quality setup coming out of their factory, up to modern days.
 
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