Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Here’s a web-based practice tool that I made a while back. It’s based on random root progressions, a concept I learned from Professor Mike Steinel while at UNT. I think it's a super cool and useful tool for practicing.

Unfortunately it basically only works on desktop-sized browsers, though. Try it out if you're near one. Thanks!

http://www.ramseycastaneda.com/projects/random-chord-progressions.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
Discussion Starter #3

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
That progression generator looks great! I'll definitely be using it in my practice sessions. Thanks for posting!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
Discussion Starter #6

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,554 Posts
Looks interesting for composition-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
735 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I love it!
Looks interesting for composition-
Great! Thanks.
Thanks, all!

Does this program have audio? I can't HEAR the randomly generated chords - which I would think is essential if attempting to improve my improvising by ear. Cheers...
No audio, unfortunately... beyond my skill set at the moment. My objective wasn't for it to help improve ear-based improvising, but instead to lead the user into unexpected harmonic territory. I mostly use random progressions to work on scales, patterns, etc.
 

·
SOTW Columnist, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
23,138 Posts
I mostly use random progressions to work on scales, patterns, etc.
I think that's a great way to use a resource like this, and I do think it's an excellent exercise. Your scale/chord degree game sounds really valuable. I do that sort of thing in my mind when I wake up at night.

Not to bring up any criticism, but one thing I would keep in mind is that most progressions are not random, so this should be balanced out with a lot of practice over standard chord progressions, chromatic movement, whole step movement, and, especially important, around the circle of fourths, which is what most chord progressions are based on. (maybe that all goes without saying...)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Not to bring up any criticism, but one thing I would keep in mind is that most progressions are not random, so this should be balanced out with a lot of practice over standard chord progressions, chromatic movement, whole step movement, and, especially important, around the circle of fourths, which is what most chord progressions are based on. (maybe that all goes without saying...)
Absolutely! I'll update the text within the next couple days to make sure this is clear. Thanks, JL.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
610 Posts
Great stuff. Set a metronome and sight read changes... in concert. haha

So many ways to organize your thoughts. I'm really interested in giving my lines shape. One thing I trip on is sequencing all kinds of short motifs and patterns through changes... trying to start/stop the ideas on sevenths and thirds so you hear the key signatures change on the beat.

Another idea I'm trying pull off is to play lines through two octaves... then turn them back on themselves. I went through a long period where I concentrated on weaving lines over the break on the horn. Like try to keep within about a tenth. I thought of it as my Chet Baker Phase. You don't really need to have a huge range to mow over changes. So, I will take the first two chords and play the first on in the bottom octave and the next one in the top octave. The idea works in reverse, top to bottom. If I play sequenced patterns like this, the motifs can stretch the time spent in a tonality... and still have a chord melody moving.

So many ways to make time and rhythm games to work through these chord ideas. You can spend two, four or eight beats... or bars... on each chord or tonality. There is a chunk of work in all that... never have to wonder what to shed. kool stuf thanx for posting this up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Question about Steinel's Inversions

Question moved to new thread.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Great stuff. Set a metronome and sight read changes... in concert. haha

So many ways to organize your thoughts. I'm really interested in giving my lines shape. One thing I trip on is sequencing all kinds of short motifs and patterns through changes... trying to start/stop the ideas on sevenths and thirds so you hear the key signatures change on the beat.

Another idea I'm trying pull off is to play lines through two octaves... then turn them back on themselves. I went through a long period where I concentrated on weaving lines over the break on the horn. Like try to keep within about a tenth. I thought of it as my Chet Baker Phase. You don't really need to have a huge range to mow over changes. So, I will take the first two chords and play the first on in the bottom octave and the next one in the top octave. The idea works in reverse, top to bottom. If I play sequenced patterns like this, the motifs can stretch the time spent in a tonality... and still have a chord melody moving.

So many ways to make time and rhythm games to work through these chord ideas. You can spend two, four or eight beats... or bars... on each chord or tonality. There is a chunk of work in all that... never have to wonder what to shed. kool stuf thanx for posting this up.
Great ideas, tenorcat! Thanks for your comments and for checking it out!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
something really useful! great
I will use it during my warm up! definitely!

do you mind to produce something like a streaming video with a metronome in which only current and next chord are visible?
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top