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I have an opportunity to purchase one at a 'decent' price.
I'm going military here, don't ask, don't tell.

To the R & C saxello players here, what made you decide on this horn instead of a 'normal' straight or curved sop??
 

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Augie- here's a clip of a very fine French player on an R&C saxello. He also told me that, after he had the neck angle lessened a slight bit, the sound really opened up for him.

 

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I've had one for about 10 years now and love it. What first attracted me to it was the semi-curved neck (for playing ergonomics), and the single body construction (never liked removable necks on soprano). But then came the sound. I had a Yamaha before and it's night and day. The R&C has a much warmer sound, almost like an extension of an Alto tone-wise.
 

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I have an opportunity to purchase one at a 'decent' price.
I'm going military here...
I thought the military option was "Buy first, ask questions later." :twisted:

Dave Dolson had one years ago - sold it to a friend of mine. Rack options are limited.
 

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It's a different instrument than a regular soprano... straight or just "standard bore".

As for altos, tenors and baritone... also the soprano (from R&C) have an extra large bore.

The curve of neck is very pronounced, more than a regular curved neck (in a generic "two pieces" soprano).

The instrument requires some adjustment on your playing style... I mean breathing and how to focus the sound into the instrument.

Here... some saxello stuff:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ija5C6W0UtI
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-34f68stk0
(the saxello used is solid silver, gold plated... very heavy instrument!)
 

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Tzadik;2422691 The curve of neck is very pronounced then a regular curved neck (in a generic "two pieces" soprano). The instrument requires some adjustment on your [I said:
playing style[/I]... I mean breathing and how to focus the sound into the instrument.
In case you didn't catch it, I had a client who had the neck angle just very slightly adjusted to lessen the bend and he said the horn just opened up with sound and response.
 

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(the saxello used is solid silver, gold plated... very heavy instrument!)
I guess "very heavy" is relative. I don't find mine heavy at all. Always played it without a neck-strap. I really like it in all aspects: sound, intonation dead-on, ergonomics, neck/body angle and looks. Mine has the so called heavy gold plating.
 

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I just came upon this thread - don't usually visit the R&C section. Congrats on your purchase.

Yes, I bought one of these new from WW&BW several years ago when they showed them in their catalogue. At the time, the advertised price was $1799 and, for a gold-plated horn of an unusual design, I decided to give it a go. I also bought an R&C sopranino from the same catalogue - and for the same price. And, I owned an R&C alto for a while. Nice instruments.

The tipped-bell R&C was a good soprano, but for me it didn't do anything any better than any of the fine sopranos I'd owned. The real problem was racking the thing while I played alto or clarinet. I finally made do with a baritone sax stand with two bell-hooks, then I hung the horn upside down from the bell. It was NOT a sturdy way to put the horn down, although I did not have any accidents with it. FWIW, my R&C tipped-bell sop was TONS better than an original King Saxello I owned at about the same time. I refuse to call the R&C (or any other tipped bell soprano) a SAXELLO, though. That name is for the King, in my view - a wholly different animal than the tipped-bells one sees.

As far as the bore size or the weight differences . . . I totally disagree with those assertions. The R&C is a soprano saxophone, that's all - soprano bore sizes and individual weight differences are negligible. DAVE
 

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Guto and I were posting at about the same time. I've been told that some straight soprano sax pegs would work for the tipped-bell sopranos but by the time I'd heard that, mine was gone. However, I wonder about that . . . seems to me that with the tipped-bell, the horn would still rest at an angle, putting the horn outside the plane of the stand. That may increase the horn's exposure to inadvertent bumps and I can just imagine that bulb on the end of a straight peg putting a dent in the tube from the inside. Maybe not, but . . . If I still had the horn, I'd probably give it a try. DAVE
 

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Dave, the sax does land at an angle on the stand but the bulb on the end of the peg is made of a semi-rigid foam. It pushes gently against the interior wall. I don't think it would damage the horn unless you bump it really hard. In that case I don't think a straight soprano would have any better luck anyway. Here is a picture of it.

My other stand I also like is the FF Fortissimo which happens to have just the exact angle to keep this sax perfectly straight up. I've mounted it to a larger wooden base to give it more stability. It's really stable like this. In case you are wondering, the steel rolls that hold the bell lips are wrapped by a soft transparent rubber that prevents any scratches. It really looks like it was made for this sax.

View attachment 68405 View attachment 68406 View attachment 68407
 

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I have a SaxRax peg that is specially designed for tipped-bell sopranos and it works well with my R&C saxello - it's a sort of rod, bent at the bottom and covered in non-marking black foam. I don't know whether SaxRax still offer that peg as I can't see it on their website.

Rhys
 

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Michael: I am not a repair-person so I really don't know about the little details that someone like Gordon or Matt would see. Mine was gorgeous and got a lot oohs and ahhs from fellow players and audiences. Of course, that look was fairly new on the scene (save for the original tip-bell Bueschers which very few see these days). The R&C felt good under my fingers and folks remarked about the sound of the thing. But honestly, I think all of us get the same thing from well maintained straight sopranos that we've owned - and played, especially when the soprano is featured.

I don't have mine any more but I do have (now) TWO Mark VI's and a Yanagisawa curvy, all of which I like better. No slam on the R&C, it just didn't trip MY trigger over the time I had it.

Thanks for the photos of the stands. DAVE
 

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I'm no repair person either but mine looks very well built. It does not have the pristine finish a mass produced Yamaha would have. You can see the little imperfections of a handmade instrument, but that only adds to its appeal in my opinion. It looks very well constructed to my eyes. I did take it to my favorite repairman when I first bought it to have it fine tuned. 10 years later it hasn't really bulged in my hands. Got a couple minor scratches on it but the mechanism is sound and it plays like it did on day 1 for me.
 
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