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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an older Couf Tenor sax, treats me pretty well for the most part. I was planing on replacing all the pads and getting it fixed up this summer, but recently it went ahead of my thinking. One of the pads (Middle B key) fell off. Its old, so its not exactly in perfect condition. Unfortunatly i NEED to have it playable for a little bit longer, and don't have the time, or money to wait for the nearly month return time at my local music store to get it fixed. Is there anything i can do to temporarly stick it on there, just for a couple more weeks? Ive heard, melt wax on the back, then melt it again once its in the slot, elemers glue, even gum tokeep it in there for a quick fix, but i dont want to hurt it, its a nice horn. Any help?
 

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Take some neats foot oil and massage the pad like its good friend and until the tonehole crease is eliminated. If you don't do this the crease may not fit the tonehole and make a leak.

Get a hot glue gun melt some glue on back of pad ..stick into keycup ... try the horn... or look to see if it is fitting or use cigarette paper to check the sealing ... heat the back of the keycup .. then press the keycup into the tonehole without too much pressure until the keycup is cool again

I have used this method with some success altho I use shellac not glue

..goodluck
frz
 

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Do not use hardware store hot glue! All you'll end up with is a bigger head ache.:shock: :?

Why not just get a local tech to replace the one pad.

The neats foot oil and hot glue gun will probably cost you just about as much as replacing a single pad.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I would just have the guys replace the one pad, but their only deal is, 3-4 pads for around 115 plus 30% because i need it rushed to use next weekend. that puts it up to near half the cost of a all pad replacement.
 

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If it's an emergency for just one pad, use a VERY SMALL amount of chewing gum, bubble gum, Blue-tac, thin double sided sellotape, or pretty well anything else. Just make sure the sealing line of the pad lines up correctly with the tonehole. If anything, put more at the front of the pad than at the back. Too much at the back, and the front of the pad won't close.

If you are not experienced, you will probably come to more grief if you try to use hot melt glue, use heat for adjustment, etc.

Neatsfoot oil may give the impression that the sealing line depression in the pad has been raised, but IMO it will do nothing to the bulk of the depression, which is in the felt beneath the leather. Better to still see the depression in the leather so you know what you are dealing with in the underlying felt. IMHO. I don't believe there is any quick (or slow) fix to restore old pads.
 

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Mandelbr0t said:
I would just have the guys replace the one pad, but their only deal is, 3-4 pads for around 115 plus 30% because i need it rushed to use next weekend. that puts it up to near half the cost of a all pad replacement.
Sounds like that shop is a "chain" store shop. I'd shop around. That's a bunch of crap, as it sounds like they have not even seen the instrument yet. We can't fix instruments over the phone, so why quote $ over the phone? Geezz. Shops like that keep shops like ours in business.
 

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Just as a side note;

My friend Tenorman Bob Amram let me on to a trick to rejuvenate old pads by applying a coat of Campho Phenique lip balm to them, clamping them shut, and letting the whole affair sit for a few days.

It works wonders on old pads that are a bit stiff, but otherwise serviceable. At least until one can get around to re-padding with fresh pads.

If your pads are old enough to be falling out from weakened shellac, this tip will likly come in handy as well.

Cheers.
 

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Also, for a temporary fix, the liquid shellac that comes in those (Valentino?) repair kits works fine if you let it "set" overnight. The repairmen will tell you it's inferior (plus I think it's harder for them to clean out), but it has worked for me numerous times in a pinch....
 

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JerryJamz2 said:
That's a bunch of crap, as it sounds like they have not even seen the We can't fix instruments over the phone, so why quote $ over the phone? Geezz. Shops like that keep shops like ours in business.
Our shop manager when asked by a caller to give an estimate on a repair politely tells the customer that it is impossible to give an accurate estimate without seeing the instrument first, and that we give free estimates at the counter. For those obstinant people who insist on a quote, he says "ok we'll make an exception in your case---I'll wait for you to go get the instrument" and when they return he says "good, now hold it up close to the phone". ;)
 

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I did have one instance where a customer called wondering how much it might cost to repair a smashed bell on his Bach trumpet. I had him email me some digital pics he took and I was then able to give him a "rough" estimate via the internet. :cool:
 

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Quick Fix

Okay,

First, I am not a tech. I am a player who had this happen once to me.
Second, I am not a tech. I don't know if this will work on your horn.

I had a student-model Yamaha tenor sax. I left it out in the trunk overnight in the middle of a Vermont winter (yes, I now realize that I should have been shot and my saxophone taken away from me - I have since turned away from my negligent ways). I brought it in and found a pad laying in the case.

Here's what I did:
A lot of times the "glue" used on saxophone pads is heat-activated. I laid the saxophone on its side with the empty tonehole up. I laid the pad in the tonehole using the existing crease as a guide. I then attempted to close the keycup over the pad. I rotated the pad until the keycup would close evenly over the pad. I played with this rotation until I thought I had the pad as close to its original orientation with the keycup as possible.

Next, I plugged in my iron. Why? Because I'm not a technician and did not want to overheat and burn the finish on my saxophone. I set the iron for no steam and Cotton ... because that sax had a soft, airy tone :D

With the pad in-place and iron hot, I closed the key over the pad and pressed with a hot iron for about a minute. I removed the iron while continuing to hold the key down (you probably want to have an insulated glove to do this so you don't burn your fingers). I held it down for about two minutes allowing the key to cool. Viola! The old pad held in place and did not leak!

My idea was to heat the glue enough to be tacky again but not to melt it completely and re-float the pad. I may have done that to some extent anyway. I very well may have just been lucky with this repair. You truly are better off having a qualified technician replace the pad. I just figured I'd offer a cheap alternative that probably won't hurt anything if it doesn't work. Good luck!
 
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