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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, just a simple question for you.

First off; I knoooooow that Soprano is more difficult to play than other saxes,
I've read it's because it requires different...mouth stuff (I dont play sax at all ;D) and it's hard to get used to it when switching from other types of sax.

Therefore would it be a good idea for somebody to start sax with a soprano?
I'd get used to how to play one without getting confused between playing techniques etc..

I'm not sure, any feedback would be greatly appreciated :)
 

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I would actually say that it's not really harder than any other sax, especially if it's the one you like most and you are motivated to practice.
If you ever want to sound really good though, you have to pay a lot of attention to your intonation. Due to the smaller mouthpiece, the soprano is a little more sensitive to changes in your embouchure, plus it's high voice makes it more noticeable (and annoying) when you are playing out of tune.
However, in my opinion all saxes are quite easy to be played out of tune and in the end all that matters is your motivation, because developing a really good sound with good intonation is a lot of work on any horn.
bye.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Okay, that's good. I'm very picky when it comes to intonation/tuning and have about 12 of the same brand/model of tin whistle because I wasn't happy with the tuning haha :p

I'll wait for a couple more replies before making my mind up :) thanks!
 

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I would never start a beginner on soprano, unless that student had a fire in their belly to only play soprano.

The best to start on, IMO is alto.
 

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First, welcome to SOTW.

Now as to starting on the soprano, I'm sure it can be done. But a lot of the mastery of the sop seems to build upon your playing maturity. I have a strong feeling that many who started sax by learning to play on the soprano would sound a lot like an out-of-tune clarinet. To sound like a soprano should probably sound, a player may need to import techniques and styles that first develop more naturally on alto or tenor sax.

I known there's lots of exceptions to this. But as someone that plays soprano as their main instrument, I'd recommend a new adult learner spend at least a year on alto or tenor first.
 

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I started on soprano because I had the fire. I was 16 years old at the time (now 71) and over time added alto and clarinet. Oh how I wish the Internet and this forum existed when I started. I went through years of teaching myself about the intricacies of this horn . . . what works and what doesn't, mouthpieces, reeds, ligatures, vintage vs. modern, etc., etc. I am STILL working out issues. It has been a wonderful ride, though.

Should you do it? Why not? Just be sure you start on a good horn - nothing more discouraging than playing a horn inherently out of tune or filled with leaks and maladjustments.

Where to start? Plenty of postings on this site to lead you in the right direction (or astray, I suppose). Spend some time and review all of the pertinent threads. Then come back and ask more questions. A lot of players will be willing to help. The "mouth stuff" by the way is called "embouchure". And yes, the soprano requires some chops but that will come with time. DAVE
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks man, that's really encouraging because I'm actually 16 myself. I'll stay here for a while before deciding, it seems like a great site. :)
 

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The difficulties of the soprano aren't universal. I started on alto, then bought a soprano six months later. I initially had a problem finding the right mouthpiece/reed combo-I had to really squeeze hard with my mouth and blow hard. I tried a Yamaha 5C mouthpiece with a #2 reed, and it opened up and played like a dream. Everyone who has heard me on my different horns has said I play much better and smoother on my soprano than on alto or tenor. Everyone.
I have a devil of a time relaxing my mouth and throat to consistently hit the low end of a tenor sax. I think some people just naturally take to one voice over another.
If you have the soprano fire, go for it. Just get some lessons and monitoring to make sure you aren't sounding like a kazoo. Good luck!
 

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If that's what you want to play, go learn it. Maybe a tenor is easier to play, so what? It's irrelevant if it ain't what you wanna play.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Cheers guys, I'll probably just go for it. I've been listening to tenor/baritone/alto all night and they just don't hit it for me.
 

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Be sure and get a good teacher...:)
 
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