Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Is expense the only real reason that beginners are often told
to not start off with a metal piece? I know that the tip opening
choice/reed strength would change with experience but if one
doesn't mind the expense of upgrading after a while anyway inspite
of cost, is there any other valid reasons here? I just bought an
Otto Link 6 STM and loving it and I am a beginner with Tenor, but
I am really tired of people telling me that "beginners shouldn't start
on a metal one". I think that a lot of this is hearsay and not backed
by much. Two people told me this at work the same day, and all I
could say was "you should have heard me last night!" I just
want to make sure that I am not missing some important key facts
about mouthpiece selection. Thanks for your input. Sorry if this
has been beaten to death on this forum, I haven't really had much success
for a lot of my questions on the searches as I seem to have to rummage
through so much to find what I am looking for.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
14,268 Posts
Committed: I'm with you. Play what you want to play - and don't let myths interfere with your enjoyment, especially if you can afford the extra bucks for a metal piece over what came with your horn.

There is very little difference, in my opinion between metal and HR pieces - it is the interior design that makes the difference. If the Link plays good for you, it will probably make learning that much easier. DAVE
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
355 Posts
Hi Committed,
I go with Dave!
For me, it's more important for begginners to start with a confortable mouthpiece... Maybe, several guys feel that hard rubber is more confortable, in a physic sense, and then that 'old advice" (or myth as Dave pointed) to start with HR.
Stay with your metal Link, you are not missing any key point, good luck and good sound!
 

·
SOTW Administrator
Joined
·
26,207 Posts
I think it's the expense of buying a metal is one reason. The other is that many metal mouthpieces have a narrow profile that beginners find it difficult to begin with. Also, many metal mouthpieces have high baffles that do not encourage beginners to play with the proper airflow.

Luckily, links have a wide profile compared to many metal mouthpieces, and have a rollover baffle that encourages proper airflow.

I see that you have chosen a modest (by today's standards) tip opening that will allow your embouchure to develop.

Keep practising.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Thanks you guys. I have to smile because I didn't admit that I
used to play Clarinet and that may be the reason that I wouldn't
mind playing on a smaller profile mouthpiece than someone who has
never played either instrument. Thank you for your unabashed insight
and knowledge. I have to laugh at how many people say things that
they have only heard but have no real personal rational for what they
are saying. One of the people who told me about the metal mouthpiece
issue is really a Trumpet player and has limited experience at best with
a Sax!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
metal vs hard rubber for sound quality

hi there,
i am looking at buying a new mouthpiece for alto sax to improve the loudness and sound quality of my playing. I play in big bands and jazz combo. Which would you suggest would be better - hard rubber or metal?
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
14,268 Posts
quitenice: Welcome to SOTW. Please read my post above.

In my opinion, the material from which a mouthpiece is made makes little, if any difference. The loudest mouthpiece in my drawer is hard rubber, but a metal Runyon (alto) I own is close. It is the interior design and the tip-opening (with an appropriate reed) that makes the difference. DAVE
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top