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Hello repair techs,
I am interested in a change of career to repair tech, and I am looking for information like career outlook, earning potential(realistic), and a general job review. I have done a few repads and just wanted to see if this is a career option to pursue or just for fun. Any info good or bad would be great. Thank you.
 

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Great question. First go to the NABIRT Website. Click "Resources" then read "Repair Schools", "For Employers", "For Repair School Graduates", and then take a look at "Sample Bench Test". This should give you some background information. The consensus among techs seems to be that the best scenario is to take one of the repair courses offered at the various repair schools and then try to get a job where you can apprentice with a highly skilled tech with years of experience to fill in the gaps of your classroom training.

NAPBIRT is an excellent resource for ongoing education and support for those in band instrument repair. I joined NAPBIRT when I started doing repairs for a living, and as a member I continue to learn new skills from their conferences, clinics, and literature. I would strongly encourage anyone going into band instrument repair to become a part of this great organization.
 

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YUP! What he ^ said. :)
 

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I am looking for information like career outlook, earning potential(realistic), and a general job review. I have done a few repads and just wanted to see if this is a career option to pursue or just for fun. Any info good or bad would be great. Thank you.
First of all the joys of being self employed are no different to any other trade. Your rewards (income) is based around your reputation / your overheads / your willingness to work. If you have no rep overheads and are lazy expect not to make a living, If you work from home, work hard do a good job chances are if your local economy can support you, you will do well. But it is no different to any other trade or industry.
 

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Don't underestimate how much you will have to spend on stock and equipment, in order to do the work well and efficiently. For the first decade, it just goes on and on.

Be aware that you will have all the compliance frustrations and pressures of running a small business, and need the personality, as Simso suggests, to attend to all of this.

The following may be of interest. It is an extract from an advertisement I put in a local school to recruit an assistant to train. It successfully weeded out unsuitable applicants!

Further Requirements:

It must be emphasised that this is not a ‘craft’ type job. It could be better described as intricate mechanical engineering, and needs specific aptitudes:

Interested in mechanisms and how they work, and how different materials behave.
Interested in technology in its broad sense (i.e. apart from electronics).
Analytical, observant of detail – detective mentality. Logical in a practical sense.
Persevering, methodical, thorough, not easily flustered.
Perfectionist. Also able to make compromise, fully understanding the parameters involved.
Remaining cool under pressure.
Good communication skills. Courteous. Complete willingness to communicate about all aspects of the work, especially when difficulties arise.
Uncompromising honesty
Complete willingness to learn – in an ongoing fashion.
Excellent finger dexterity.
Above average arm and finger strength.
Note that it is not necessary to be able to play any of the instruments involved. The job is engineering and has little to do with music. However, the job would be more interesting to somebody who does play.​

Be assured that if this prescription seems intimidating, confidence is not a requirement. That grows along with skill in the job.​
 
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