Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey friends... I'm a teacher and a gigging clarinetist and saxophonist -- in my late 50s. When the decades-old dental bridgework on my upper front teeth failed (teeth 8, 9 and 10 for you who know the system,) the dentist told me the only good option was two implants plus a new crown.

Took a year and $12+ grand, but when the work was finally complete I couldn't wait to play my horns with the new teeth. Was immediately very disappointed however. The implants are "numb" (of course) and there is literally no feeling there, no feedback in terms of bite pressure, and a decidedly uncomfortable feeling when playing. No pain, just numbness and an uncomfortable sensation of pressure in the bone.

The dentist says the "feeling" will improve, although physiologically I can't see how this is possible since there are screws where live teeth used to be. (The dentist is an accordionist, BTW!) Now I realize how important live teeth are -- even just the live root with a crown or onlay -- in terms of bite feedback and transmission of vibrations into your skull. The live tooth, with its ligament foundation and a nerve connection, is very different from the 100 percent rigid, dead implant.

Might any of you who have been through this share your experience, post-implant? I'm hoping for improvement because practice and playing is really uncomfortable now. During the year of implant work I had two "vacancies" where my teeth were missing, but at least I could play comfortably with the temporary "Exeter bridge" in place. Had I known the outcome in terms of the uncomfortable bite sensation, I might even have opted for a denture or some other type of bridge. For now I'm practicing trombone (!!) and thinking about buying an EWI...

Thanks so much in advance for your time reading and any insight or advice you might offer.... And if you're gonna play hockey, definitely wear a face mask! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
cmackail,

My two front teeth are implants, and the two on either side are crowns. I too played on a bridge for years, then had the implants put in when the bridge finally failed due to bone loss. You're right in that the implants are SOLID. No movement at all. It did take a little getting used to, but I had no problems with feel or playability so to speak.

I'm sorry to hear that it's an issue for you, but I would suggest to not give up. Keep playing. I'm guessing that your mouth, and especially your brain will adapt. I'm thinking, (of course I'm no expert and could be wrong) that the largest hurdle for you is mental. The brain is very powerful, and I have confidence that you can overcome the challenge.

I wish you the best of success!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks, Wheels. Appreciated....

GT and JG, thanks for the heads-up on Ronnie Scott.... I didn't know the story of his passing. I thought the recurring post-traumatic memories of the Ted Heath band had killed him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
My two front teeth are also moving and my gum is swelling. Is it possible to still save my front teeth?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Thanks.

Damn, I'm still afraid to go to the dentist :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
226 Posts
I broke my front two top teeth and knocked out a lower one when I was 10. For the next 7 years I played with front teeth that were an upside down v shape. At 17, I got crowns (the day after senior pictures, no less). At that time 1 tooth was dead. I had some fairly major jaw surgery due to an undiagnosed abscess, too. Sometime over the next few years, the other one died. I've had no problems playing once I got used to full front teeth again. I broke quite a few reeds for a bit by smacking them into those new front teeth. I also had to get used to half of my jaw being numb due to nerve damage from the surgery. I am so used to it now that it seems normal and I'm sure yours will, too. I will just take time.

I do live in fear of getting implants to replace my crowns. They are 31 years old now. I am terrified of dentists! (Wonder why?) I am also vain enough to worry about how I'll look with no front teeth.
 

·
Indistinguishable Resident Buescher Bigot and Foru
Joined
·
8,588 Posts
You ever hear the story of how Ronnie Scott died?
Moral of the story, don't take pain killers after dental implant surgery?
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
Joined
·
7,393 Posts
In this respect I've been lucky. While I have a couple of implants, they're not near the front. I didn't take good care of my teeth when I was younger and finally started with a great dentist in 1990. She literally saved my smile and my playing career. Now I go twice a year for cleaning/exam and don't hesitate to go if anything crops up in-between. I believe you can get used to playing with 'dead' implants for front teeth but you'll have to give it some time.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2014
Joined
·
26,274 Posts
Post is in, still need to wait for a few months before the Crown goes on. Unfortunately, I broke another crown on the other side of my a few days ago due to avoiding chewing on the implant side while it heals, etc. Aargh.
I broke my crown the same way I broke the original tooth by chomping on hard candy. The metal under the crown is still intact and is working wonderfully tho. So, you really don't need a/the crown on a molar. :)
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
823 Posts
I broke my crown the same way I broke the original tooth by chomping on hard candy. The metal under the crown is still intact and is working wonderfully tho. So, you really don't need a/the crown on a molar. :)
I got my first crown a few weeks ago. After some research, and after going to two dentists, I settled on a gold crown. It's silver colored as it is an alloy of different metals. Since it is a back tooth (#18 next to my wisdom tooth) It's not that noticeable - looks like a big silver filling. The remains of my old tooth will crack before this crown will crack. It's pretty much feeling like a regular tooth after a few weeks ~after the initial trauma is over.

Another benefit of gold crowns is that they are easier on the opposing tooth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,357 Posts
Implants can be done entirely pain free as my just completed work was. But make sure you go to a really good place, particularly one that does 3D imaging of your mouth and no guess work or eyeballing as to placement, that is usually the source of horror stories about them.

I recommend BIDC in Bangkok. I got state of the art work by a USA trained dentist who lectures worldwide at dental colleges. The price including three trips here and wonderful vacations was still less than in the states and it went fantastically well.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top